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Thread: Kids and gluten, where to draw the line? page 4

  1. #31
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    yup. that's why the teachers ask us to go with the bakery. it's owned by a local family, and nothing cross contaminates in their bakery. It's also affordable, to be honest. We spent $12 on a cake for DS which was delightful and flavorful.

    We now get all of our birthday cakes there, unless our friend makes it (she has gluten in her kitchen, so cross contamination is possible, but since we are not gluten sensitive, it's not that big of a deal).

    When I first came to NZ, I didn't even know what "GF" meant on the menus. People told me, and I was like "wow, they take this really seriously here." That was in 2007. And it was obviously in place before then. It totally is just the way it is here.

  2. #32
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    I hate to pull the "CO is everything" card, but have you tried coconut oil on the rash?
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    I hate to pull the "CO is everything" card, but have you tried coconut oil on the rash?
    I haven't, but it's definitely worth a try! Thanks.

  4. #34
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    Just curious, do schools in the US actually check lunches?!
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  5. #35
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    Are food allergies as rampant as they seem?

    I wonder how society is going to change if we cater to every allergy at schools? Is our military going to have to serve gluten/egg/dairy free meals? Will college cafeterias have to do the same, and ban pizza in dorms? Will corporations have to eliminate birthday cakes?

    If we have a generation of kids really reactive, even without ingesting the food, that's just not good. Do the allergies get better over time?

    It's strange that on one hand, we have schools banning peanuts, gluten, eggs, sugar and dairy, and on the other hand we have schools serving coke and McDonalds for lunch.

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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadsie View Post
    Just curious, do schools in the US actually check lunches?!
    I know I have to label it if I send an almond butter & jelly sandwich just so that they don't think it's peanut butter.

    Edited to add that the sandwich is on gluten-free bread.
    Last edited by meeshar; 02-19-2013 at 07:51 PM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by notlupus View Post
    Sounds like she needs a gluten trial then, ASAP. Even if you home school her you will end up sending her to high school and hopefully college so she WILL need the diagnosis at some point. The gluten trial will be so much easier now when she's younger and will heal from it more quickly.

    If you plan to home school high school then please PM me and I can give you the details of why it's not a good idea (I tutor and have a lot of experience with home schoolers, since I was home schooled myself).

    I couldn't even finish the thread without feeling the need to respond. Sorry, you had a bad experience homeschooling but you are not everyone else. Wow, I am not even sure what else to say but please don't give people such broad advice. Wow. I hope none of my clients never ends up with you as a tutor.

    To the original poster. Since your daughter has been exposed recently I'd insist on a blood test so she doesn't have to keep being exposed if it is the gluten. however, the test has false negatives so even with a negative test she still may need to refrain from gluten. I'd also be talking with the teachers and tell them she is showing signs. The reaction after eating school lunch is highly suspicious and also loose stools would be enough for me to ban all gluten. Actually, it was enough for me to ban all processed crap. no one deserves to feel sick just because they ate something they should not have eaten. Good luck.
    Last edited by Primal123; 02-19-2013 at 01:17 PM.

  8. #38
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    Some allergies do get better over time. A lot of children outgrow them by age 5/6 -- which is why the kindy is pretty strict, but the upper grades are less so *unless* there is a known situation like celiacs or severe nut allergies.

    Military already makes provisions, as do prisons and universities. Those provisions may not be perfect, but they are already there. it's similar to providing kosher options (and vegetarian ones as well). For these institutions, it's not THAT big of a deal, and the main thing is labeling ingredients and labeling things kosher, gluten free, etc.

    I dont' think it's that big of a deal, honestly. I don't know why people feel that it's this horrible deal and a terrible slippery slope.

    And yes, some schools do check lunches (particularly of younger children because they have a tendency to share "unconsciously"), whereas with older children, they are less likely to check because at that age the children are self-regulating (ie, children with issues are less likely to just randomly accept food from their friend).

    Most schools simply send a letter home asserting that there are children in the school with X allergies -- and a description of the reactions that these children will have such as going into anaphylactic shock -- and to please omit this from the child's lunches, snacks, etc.

    And most parents -- like myself -- find it easy enough to comply with those needs.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by meeshar View Post
    ....... and am gluten intolerant myself so we eat gluten-free at home, ......(
    Not challenging, just clarifying, have you been tested for antibodies or is it a self diagnosis through symptoms?

    Is there anyone else in your extended family on either side that has gluten issues or any chronic conditions?

    There are a number of pointers that she may have intollerence, and antibody testing may confirm that, though it must be remembered that some individuals are intollerent even though they are AB negative and simply diagnosed on the basis that their symptoms clear when gluten is removed from their diet.

    Gluten is becoming a much bigger issue than just Coeliac, the icberg they call it, 90% of the problems are below the surface, so I am getting to the position of less gluten is better for anyone, but within the constraints around you, so understand your dilema with the school thing not causing a fuss.

    Can you try run an informal symptoms check, during term holidays, keep strictly gluten free, then add gluten and see if there is a reaction, know it's hard putting your child through the pain, but you may need to do it.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    Not challenging, just clarifying, have you been tested for antibodies or is it a self diagnosis through symptoms?

    Is there anyone else in your extended family on either side that has gluten issues or any chronic conditions?

    There are a number of pointers that she may have intollerence, and antibody testing may confirm that, though it must be remembered that some individuals are intollerent even though they are AB negative and simply diagnosed on the basis that their symptoms clear when gluten is removed from their diet.

    Gluten is becoming a much bigger issue than just Coeliac, the icberg they call it, 90% of the problems are below the surface, so I am getting to the position of less gluten is better for anyone, but within the constraints around you, so understand your dilema with the school thing not causing a fuss.

    Can you try run an informal symptoms check, during term holidays, keep strictly gluten free, then add gluten and see if there is a reaction, know it's hard putting your child through the pain, but you may need to do it.
    I have not been tested myself and I really don't want to be tested at this point because even just a small amount of gluten causes joint pain, digestive issues, and skin rashes.

    There is family history of gluten and lactose intolerance (though not officially diagnosed as Celiac that I know of) and definitely chronic conditions. Oddly enough, the Native American heritage is on that same side of my family.

    I am already conducting a pseudo test, she is eating cafeteria food this week (and not being restricted if/when we eat out). I'd like to see if the rash continues or clears up. She did say that coconut oil helped it not itch so much, so that's a plus, thank you namelesswonder!! If it gets worse, I'm taking her back to the doctor and pushing for testing.
    Last edited by meeshar; 02-19-2013 at 08:32 PM.

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