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Thread: Kids and gluten, where to draw the line? page 2

  1. #11
    Ayla2010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notlupus View Post
    You clearly have never had to live with a celiac. Anytime I am forced to eat food others have prepared I have a 50/50 chance of getting sick. Cross contamination is a huge problem and the only way to get the college dining staff to let you out of the meal plan is with a diagnosis.

    My SO is in deep, deep trouble right now because he was too lazy to put a pizza pan in the sink and flipped it over on the counter. I moved it, prepped my food in that general area, and am now having a reaction to it (I thought the pan was clean and face down to avoid dust so I didn't clean off the counter because I was using a plate). There were no visible crumbs on the counter, and my food never directly touched it but now I'm having massive heartburn and bloating that will last for days. It's not as simple to deal with celiac as you think.
    With a celiac diagnosis, will the school ban all gluten? Like with nut allergies and banning nuts? Cos somehow I doubt that.
    So even a diagnosis won't prevent accidental contamination.
    As it is, with the nuts, even though there are foods prepared that could have touched nuts, like the packaged foods, those are not banned because its so minimal, but that isn't going to matter to the child with the nut allergy.
    So all these same things may have been in contact with wheat, so all I am saying is how will the diagnosis change much? Something to think about.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayla2010 View Post
    With a celiac diagnosis, will the school ban all gluten? Like with nut allergies and banning nuts? Cos somehow I doubt that.
    So even a diagnosis won't prevent accidental contamination.
    As it is, with the nuts, even though there are foods prepared that could have touched nuts, like the packaged foods, those are not banned because its so minimal, but that isn't going to matter to the child with the nut allergy.
    So all these same things may have been in contact with wheat, so all I am saying is how will the diagnosis change much? Something to think about.
    The diagnosis means she gets an IEP and all sorts of essential accommodations that would not be available otherwise. Tables where playdoh (wheat based) will not be used, no snacks in the classroom, etc. It all depends on the school and the individual child's sensitivity level, but without a doctor saying she needs it she gets NOTHING. Play doh really is the devil for celiac kids. Many of my students have had 504 and IEPs and they really are essential for getting fair treatment and a chance to learn without fear of illness.

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    So no other kids get to use it either? Or does your daughter get kept separate?
    IEP?

    Its a good thing of course, I am not saying its not, but there is a lot the school will have to stop at least in a celiacs class, and I just can't imagine it here at least.
    So what about packaged foods? Would that not affect your daughter or you if you came in contact even a little of it? Id love to see them banned in schools personally but I know it will never happen. What about if her friends have sandwiches for lunch?

  4. #14
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    Thanks, notlupus, I think that public high school with a basis of either homeschooling or Montessori is a good thing. It's hard to be a high achiever in a field of mediocrity and social hierarchy. She is only almost 5 and yes, I think this has to happen now. Her previous doctor in NC (a family practice doc, not a pediatrician) was awesome. To this day I rue his retirement because when I told him that we didn't feed her jarred mush (she got what we ate and could handle, aka baby led weaning) he was ecstatic because we did what he did with his 8 kids. I miss him.

    I hate the idea that we have to fit AROUND modern medicine. That's why I am both for and against feeding my child poison (i.e. bread, McNuggets, Little Debbies, etc.) in order to not get flack from the ignorant doctors that we've seen so far. I'm sorry, but when I took her in for her physical to be eligible for pre-K, I saw an obese toddler drinking orange soda out of a bottle, yet the doctor was visibly shocked that she had never had any visits to the doctor that weren't well visits, therefore she's never had antibiotics. (I'd like to keep it that way as long as possible)

    Sadly, I think that she has to go through this. Her school is already a peanut-free zone, as well as a latex-free zone, but gluten free might break them. I'm not really a fan of the whole "x-free zone" crap, I'd just rather send her with her own food, and be notified if there were a birthday/holiday/etc. where the other kids get treats and she'd feel left out. I just noticed this today, and don't have any diagnoses yet.

  5. #15
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    Meeshar that sounds like the best thing.
    The point I was trying to make, but not sure if I explained well, was that IF the diagnosis would completely protect her from all (But I guess making everyone else miss out, if it would even happen that way), then it would be worth going through. I just can't see how without removing everything packaged as well, that nut allergies and celiac's would be completely protected.

    W

  6. #16
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    Good luck with the gluten trial. I wish my family had been aware enough to have me diagnosed early on instead of having to endure years worth of heartburn meds and ridicule from doctors (school wasn't too stressful for me, I just couldn't eat the crap they were forcing into me). It was shockingly normal for students to need rx heartburn medication once they started eating the dining hall crap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by notlupus View Post
    Good luck with the gluten trial. I wish my family had been aware enough to have me diagnosed early on instead of having to endure years worth of heartburn meds and ridicule from doctors (school wasn't too stressful for me, I just couldn't eat the crap they were forcing into me). It was shockingly normal for students to need rx heartburn medication once they started eating the dining hall crap.
    That is really crappy

  8. #18
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    I think the test for celiac involves a biopsy from the colon. Not exactly an easy test. If it were me I would do a simple elimination/stress test for my own knowledge (or just forget it and know that it should be avoided anyway, as you know since your at this site) and find a good Dr. or ND who will write the school note you need without the biopsy test.

    FWIW I homeschool my kids and can't imagine sending them to school if for no reason other than food. The only private school around us is a Waldorf school where preparing bread and other grains is a part of the daily class routine. That's all nice and sweet if you think whole grains are good for you, but rather horrid if you're not allowed to eat them, yet have to prepare them for your classmates and watch them eat it everyday!

  9. #19
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    I have had this discussion about doing a challenge test on my 2yo with her dr on numerous occasions. An official diagnosis would be useful but it would be quite torturous for her. He believes the benefits of a label don't warrant the pain. I tend to agree.

    So we just say no gluten, no arguments.
    Became Primal August 2011

    SW - 84kg / 185lb
    CW - 60kg / 132lb
    GW - 60kg / 132lb

  10. #20
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    I think it's fair enough to start by telling teachers that you suspect a gluten allergy (celiac) and provide them with the most *basic* information about that. And, make sure she gets her special food (and/or enough to share).

    Our school is sugar, gluten, nut, latex, dairy, and egg free. Then, allergies outside of this are accommodated as well. Parents only provide food (shared) at their child's birthday, and we are given a letter ahead of time describing any other allergies outside of these (ie, the one kid's strawberry allergy), and then we are given recipes as well as a recommendation to a local bakery that specializes in vegan, gluten free (etc) cakes and cookies. We, btw, purchase instead of making our own just because of time/equipment/etc.

    It isn't the end of the world; everyone does adapt.

    In terms of the diagnosis -- it's worth having a look and see what is what. This will help get speciality elements going forward from educators, etc. Once you have the diagnosis, you can follow up with the teachers saying "yes, this is the diagnosis."

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