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Thread: Ladies who lift

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  1. #1
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    Ladies who lift

    Much to my past self's surprise, I've decided to start lifting. I've reached a plateau in Yoga and want to mix things up a bit. I did some reading about deadlifting and it sounds like an amazing way to build strength. But mainly, I want the bum

    So today I joined the gym! Other than that, I have no idea where to start. What weight free weights should I use initially? What are the best free weight exercises to do (links with pictures)? Are the resistance machines a waste of time? How do I deadlift without killing myself?

    I would also really appreciate if the ladies who lift could share their experiences. What were your goals at the outset? How did you begin and progress? What effect did lifting have on your body composition?

    No bitchy comments please from those who have no tolerance for newbies (you know who you are ).

    ----------

    Btw, just had to share my gym instructor's helpful comment during the compulsory induction when I asked him what the point of the arm bicycle was... "It's cardio... for your arms." LOL.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  2. #2
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    Fitness level: I do about 4 hours of Yoga a week, cycle / walk for an hour a day, sprint once a week. I can hold a plank for 3 minutes, can do infinite numbers of squats (strong thighs) but can't do a pull up to save my life.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  3. #3
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    Jan 2013
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    I'll have to pay attention to this thread! Most specifically I want to start getting into squating/dead lifting with a barbell, as well as benching. The problem that I run into though is that I'm a little hesitant to start embarking into all of that without having a spotter.

  4. #4
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    if you want to lift weights, i think a progressive barbell program is the best way to go regardless of sex. take a look at starting strength stronglifts. they both focus on big movements, starting light to focus on form, adding weight each workout, and physical strength rather than body building.

  5. #5
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    It might seem expensive, but you might invest in a trainer at your new gym, if only to learn the correct techniques for lifting whatever. It's not as easy as it sounds (!) and you can injure your joints with bad technique...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by drjoyous View Post
    It might seem expensive, but you might invest in a trainer at your new gym, if only to learn the correct techniques for lifting whatever. It's not as easy as it sounds (!) and you can injure your joints with bad technique...
    I'd advise against this, especially at large commercial gyms. The trainers usually know a smidge more than nothing.

    I would second the suggestion to read Starting Strength by Rippetoe. I wouldn't bother with Stronglifts.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    I'd advise against this, especially at large commercial gyms. The trainers usually know a smidge more than nothing.
    I do not agree with your statement. Certainly there are poor trainers that lack certification and/or a clue, but they can be found anywhere. And the same thing can be said about many industries - there are lawyers and doctors out there without a clue too. If you do the proper research, then you can find a decent trainer. If you know what questions to ask you can certainly find out whether you are speaking with someone who knows what they are talking about.

    I belong to a commercial gym and have a trainer who is a former power lifter with all the right credentials, education and background. We focus on form and quality - not quantity. I've been with him for over a year now - lost over 40 pounds and have increased my lifts into the advanced/elite categories, never injured - not once. And I come from a background of being chronically overweight and was never an athlete and had never lifted a weight in my entire life.

    OP: If you are interested in learning how to lift, I would suggest speaking with your gym and finding out whether the trainers there have the proper credentials. Ask about education, certifications (look up which ones are legitimate and which ones are online certifications and learn the difference), ask for testimonials from former/current clients, etc. If you are not impressed, don't hire them. I can tell you from experience that as a woman interested in learning how to weight lift properly -- that hiring a trainer was the best thing I could have done. It helped to boost my confidence in the weight room (a struggling point for most beginning female lifters) and I picked up everything must more quickly than if I had tried to teach myself.

    If you are more interested in self-teaching (which is also great! Just something I could not have done myself over a year ago) - check out this site: stumptuous.com
    Lots of great articles, videos and tips can be found there! It's just one of many many resources out there - but this one is specifically written for the ladies.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purple Leather Couch View Post
    I do not agree with your statement. Certainly there are poor trainers that lack certification and/or a clue, but they can be found anywhere. And the same thing can be said about many industries - there are lawyers and doctors out there without a clue too. If you do the proper research, then you can find a decent trainer. If you know what questions to ask you can certainly find out whether you are speaking with someone who knows what they are talking about.
    Most trainers do not have a clue when it comes to strength training. Finding one that's knowledgeable is hard for anyone, much less for someone who is brand new to lifting. How is the OP supposed to determine who is a good trainer vs who is bad? What exactly would the "proper" search be if the person does not know what constitutes accurate information on the subject of lifting? Doctors and lawyers vary in quality, but their credentials mean a lot more in their respective fields than most personal training certificates. You won't find a heart surgeon who does not know how to properly perform heart surgery. However, you will find plenty of personal trainers that do not know how to squat correctly.

    If you get the knowledge yourself (hence my recommendation to read Starting Strength), you, if you still choose to do so, can at least have some idea about who is a bad trainer.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Oct 2011
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    Australia
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    I agree with barbells machines are just not needed

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