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Thread: New To Paleo - 2 Questions page

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    s-piper's Avatar
    s-piper is offline Senior Member
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    New To Paleo - 2 Questions

    1. What if I hate fatty meat? I made a dish with vegetables, seasonings, and beef stew meat which I simmered until tender in water. The beef was tender, but the patches that were fat were so chewy and disgusting. I tried to just not think about it and swallow them, but some I had to spit out. Basically, I've always hated the gristly parts of meat and am used to trimming all I possibly can off.
    The beef was organic, free range, and hormone/antibiotic free. It did not say grassfed, which leds me to believe it probably was not purely grassfed. However, it's the best I could do on my budget.
    I guess what I'm asking is this the kind of thing you just have to push through until you get used to it, or is there a way to help?

    2. About cocanut milk. Most recommendations say get the ones in cans. Well I'm not too keen on canned foods because of BPA and BPS (both hormone mimickers) in the linings. Not that paper cartons are that much better because they also have BPA in the lining, but I don't know of any cocanut milk in glass containers. Anyone have a solution or is there just not one?

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    magicmerl's Avatar
    magicmerl is offline Senior Member
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    1. Use a slowcooker. It is the *best* way to cook the cheaper fattier cuts of meat. Well cooked (> 8 hours) fat is not gristly at all.

    2. You can get coconut 'oil' in glass jars....
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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    Native Forest has BPA free cans but I do not know if their cans contain BPS. I have been wondering about it as I have a case of them in my kitchen. Maybe make your own from dried coconut. It's possible I have done it but I don't really like it and it was messy. However, I know people do make it regularly and love it so it's a personal taste thing.

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    s-piper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Primal123 View Post
    Native Forest has BPA free cans but I do not know if their cans contain BPS. I have been wondering about it as I have a case of them in my kitchen. Maybe make your own from dried coconut. It's possible I have done it but I don't really like it and it was messy. However, I know people do make it regularly and love it so it's a personal taste thing.
    '

    Yeah that's a good question, and one of the problems with the fact that though the package must say what's in the food it doesn't have to say what's in the packaging.
    The problem, though, is that there isn't a good replacement for BPA or BPS in can linings and, especially for acidic foods, a lining is very important or it'll eat away at the can.

    Maybe I will try making my own cocanut milk.

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    LauraSB's Avatar
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    You can ease into fatty cuts of meat if you prefer. I am super picky about pork shoulder, for example. I have actually made carnitas using pork loin and then fried up the meat in coconut oil to get a fattier taste because I was squicked out by the amount of visible fat on the shoulders available at the time. I have a chuck roast in the frig that will get a big vein of hard fat removed before it goes into the crock pot. I feel like that a huge step for me because at one time I wouldn't even have used such a fatty cut for pot roast. The smaller veins of fat don't faze me anymore.
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    No requirement to eat fatty cuts of meat. But I would just make sure you were getting enough fat from other sources.

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    peril's Avatar
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    If the fat is chewy then you haven't cooked it right. I cook my cheap cuts of meat on the lowest heat on the stove for 3-4 hours. Don't put in too much water - just enough to cover. Check every 30min or so. If it starts to stick to the bottom or the gravy is too thick, add some more water. The idea is to get a thick gravy that includes the fat rendered in the cooking along with gelatin. No way can I enjoy a casserole made from trimmed meat
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    Ayla2010's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    If the fat is chewy then you haven't cooked it right. I cook my cheap cuts of meat on the lowest heat on the stove for 3-4 hours. Don't put in too much water - just enough to cover. Check every 30min or so. If it starts to stick to the bottom or the gravy is too thick, add some more water. The idea is to get a thick gravy that includes the fat rendered in the cooking along with gelatin. No way can I enjoy a casserole made from trimmed meat
    mmm damn I am looking forward to winter now, and making some slow cooked casseroles

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