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Thread: Potato question - sweet vs white page 2

  1. #11
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kochin View Post
    I view them as interchangeable, but subtle differences make white potatoes preferable for weight gain (fat OR muscle) and sweet potatoes better if you limit your carbs (as they have more micro-nutrients, so you get more micro-bang for your macro-buck, if you get what I mean).

    I use sweet-taters when not very hungry and white ones when starving.
    How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

    Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.

  2. #12
    WeldingHank's Avatar
    WeldingHank is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

    Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.
    Like plantains, check out mofongo. Huge Hispanic population around here, so lots of restaurants around here serve it. I usually get it with chiccarones. Drool....

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    How do you cook sweet potatoes? I have been wrapping them whole in tin foil and baking, but they come out really mushy. They are edible, but no where near the fluffy texture of a white potato.

    Also, do they have plantains where you are? Those are excellent! I just started eating them this year and wish I knew about them years ago.
    Fried:
    Slice VERY thinly and fry in lard or tallow.

    Boiled in stews:
    Use to replace carrots or other sweet root veg/tubers.

    Baked:
    Bake in their skin, no foil. That way the skin is firm and the flesh is nicer. Take them out when ALMOST done, cut open and mush up. If you want them fluffy it's best to microwave-finish after that. Add butter and either sardines of fried bacon bits.

    Mashed:
    With butter and seasoning.

    Grilled:
    Slice thinly (not as thin as for fried) and grill, maybe with some salt.

    Frittata:
    Grate raw sweet tater and mix with egg, ground meat and seasoning. Make a patty and fry.

    Oven chips:
    Slice to chip size (along with other veg, usually). Soak in water for about an hour, maybe more. Place in a pan with lard and roast. Be sure to turn them over, to coat them in lard!

    They have plantains at the local Asian stores, but I've not yet bought any. They're a bit pricey so far. Not quite the season for them, it seems, but they will apparently be cheaper in Summer. I've had taro and yam from them, though. Those are damn nice starches.
    Sweet taters, bananas and taro probably account for every "high carb" day I've had.
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  4. #14
    Ouis's Avatar
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    if you have a crockpot, that seems like the best way to cook both whites and sweets. By the way, I MUCH prefer the japanese sweet potatoes that are purplish on the outside and white on the inside. Anyhow, I put a bunch of regular and sweets together in the crockpot with about an inch of water in the bottom and let them cook on high for 4 hours. They do not shrivel up like they do in the oven or get grainy like they do when you boil them. I think they are steaming in the crockpot, so they are moist and plump. Really great way to cook taters.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Timber View Post
    Some info I found , copy and paste:

    Sweet potatoes are actually a completely different vegetable than regular potatoes. They are not even in the same botanical family. While each is an important vegetable, deserving of a place in a healthy diet, these two foods feature different tastes and unique nutritional benefits. Sweet potatoes offer a host of nutrients and an impressive array of antioxidants. They taste delicious, are easy to prepare and can be used in a variety of dishes, even in some that call for white potatoes.

    Sweet potatoes are not "potatoes"

    While there are over 100 varieties of edible potatoes that range in size, shape, color, starch content and flavor, the sweet potato is not one of them. These two root vegetables are in fact from two completely different families. The potato's scientific name, Solanum tuberosum reflects that it belongs to the Solanaceae family whose other members include tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, and tomatillos.

    The sweet potato, on the other hand, belongs to the Convolvulaceae plant family and is known by the scientific name of Ipomoea batatas. The well-known flower called "Morning Glory" belongs to the same botanical family as the sweet potato.
    Thanks, I find it interesting that it isn't a potato at all.

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