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Thread: Any other women who put on muscle ridiculously easily? page 9

  1. #81
    eKatherine's Avatar
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    I am an easygainer. If I eat too many calories, I put on fat quickly. If I do strength exercise, I build muscle quickly. I don't even have to do all that much strength exercise to gain muscle. My biceps and triceps right now are much bigger than my boyfriend's. Of course, he has those Asian calf muscles, and he has done zero exercise to get them. Genes.

    I am currently leaner than I have ever been. I have been more muscular, especially in my thighs, back during my speedskating days. At that point my bodyfat level made me appear "bulky". I think that is key to whether a woman looks bulky or not, how thick the layer of fat padding her muscles is.

    Now I look angular. I have no doubt I could be as muscular as Stacy Tovar merely by tweaking my workout, and as lean by losing another 15 or 20 pounds.

    I attribute this to my Neanderthal genes.

    But I'm not interested in pushing myself to the limit to satisfy other people's goals and expectations. I'm interested in being healthy and staying that way. I go out of my way to avoid injuring myself. Thus I can continue to make unimpeded progress.

    I find guys who find women unimpressive to be unimpressive.
    Last edited by eKatherine; 02-14-2013 at 02:31 PM.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    Question: Someone like Christmas is narrow, but has amazing muscles, yet they probably aren't very heavy, right? Some people on this forum (ie. Kharnath) only seem to view muscle in terms of its weight. SO where does that leave Christmas? (my new role model )
    Great question.

    The answer is mostly in how you train. A lb of muscle is different in terms of strength depending on how you train it. Think about that - it's important.

    For instance: Body builders (whose entire sport is predicated on big, huge muscles) have muscles that are adapted to be large (not explosive like weightlifters or powerlifters).
    Weightlifters (readne word, not weight lifters) have nurologically adapted their muscle fibers so that more more fibers are recruited (and faster) when exerting force. What this means is that their muscles and more efficient once for ounce for the sake of strength/force/power than a body builder's yet typically there is not as much actual muscle mass - which is why they don't seem to look as strong as bodybuilders (probably).

    68B35691629732B27D823143BE1259.jpg

    article-2181557-144B7157000005DC-218_634x590.jpg

    SMITHTHTHTT.jpg


    Unlike weightlifters though, powerlifters are training their systems non-explosively. They aren't doing the olympic lifts (clean, jerk, snatch) which are explosive and fast. They are benching, squatting and deadlifting - these are STRENGTH movements, and not power movements (the name is misleading...).

    Could go on for months about this; the takeaway is that if you want to be strong but also slim(mer) - you want to train the explosive, olympic lifts. These lifts inact less of a strain on the central nervous system than strenth lifts which allows for less need of recovery time. On a daily basis in terms of practical application I would argue that being powerful is more useful than being strong. Read more about as well as the training methodologies therein here.
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  3. #83
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    I had to look those two women up. Yeah, for sure, if I could get as muscular as that first one that's what I would look like. Not like the skinnier one. Here's a picture of my sister and me. You can see from this picture that we have two completely different body types. My sister could probably obtain the dancer's body. But me? No way. I don't even think our bones are the same size.

    I don't even want a dancer's body. I would be miserable trying to obtain it.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 195 x 3

  4. #84
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    SB my two younger daughters are like that. chalk and cheese.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFastCat View Post
    Could go on for months about this; the takeaway is that if you want to be strong but also slim(mer) - you want to train the explosive, olympic lifts. These lifts inact less of a strain on the central nervous system than strenth lifts which allows for less need of recovery time. [/URL].
    Thankyou, this is very concise and helpful. I will look up your links.

  6. #86
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    That's really interesting, FastCat. I never learned how to do the olympic lifts well, and they are harder to do without a gym, which I really don't have time for at this point. Would adding plyo exercises carry some of the same benefit as doing these kinds of lifts? I'm completely willing to admit that I am a lifting novice as far as techniques go.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFastCat View Post
    For instance: Body builders (whose entire sport is predicated on big, huge muscles) have muscles that are adapted to be large (not explosive like weightlifters or powerlifters).
    Weightlifters (readne word, not weight lifters) have nurologically adapted their muscle fibers so that more more fibers are recruited (and faster) when exerting force. What this means is that their muscles and more efficient once for ounce for the sake of strength/force/power than a body builder's yet typically there is not as much actual muscle mass - which is why they don't seem to look as strong as bodybuilders (probably).


    Unlike weightlifters though, powerlifters are training their systems non-explosively. They aren't doing the olympic lifts (clean, jerk, snatch) which are explosive and fast. They are benching, squatting and deadlifting - these are STRENGTH movements, and not power movements (the name is misleading...).

    Could go on for months about this; the takeaway is that if you want to be strong but also slim(mer) - you want to train the explosive, olympic lifts. These lifts inact less of a strain on the central nervous system than strenth lifts which allows for less need of recovery time. On a daily basis in terms of practical application I would argue that being powerful is more useful than being strong. Read more about as well as the training methodologies therein here.
    This is brilliant Fast Cat - thanks!

    Have I got this right:

    Powerlifters - train non-explosively, look bigger.
    Weightlifters - train explosively, are more powerful?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFastCat View Post
    A lb of muscle is different in terms of strength depending on how you train it. Think about that - it's important.
    That makes perfect sense. So someone who is doing a martial art for eg. might have smaller muscles to look at than a boydbuilder, but due to the explosive style of the training the muscles may be more fibrous, and therefore potentially heavier, and more powerful?

    Someone doing a martial art would put their body through a greater range of motion than someone doing weights, thereby creating more muscle fibres?
    Last edited by YogaBare; 02-15-2013 at 01:46 AM.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  8. #88
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    Thank you everyone for the kind words about my straying thoughts - I am working on my body-mind stuff, so I think about it a lot. So, I am thinking, maybe my inner self is designed to be comforting and enduring, rather than lean and aggressive which was always the ideal that my mom instilled in me, and that's what my body is trying to show.... anyway.

    Martial arts are great, particularly if you train against the resistance of a bag (I loved it, but have no opportunity to do it, and love other things more). Martial artists will benefit greatly from dynamic/explosive training - one of my most beloved books was Kettlebell Training for Athletes, and it had a lot of great ideas on improving the athletic performance with the weight training. I am a HUGE fan of finding these synergies.

    My ideal training is a combination of power-lifting and swimming. I had a break in swimming, and then I have read 4-Hour Body that had an article on the immersion method, so I went into the pool, and tried my laps, and holly-smokes, I couldn't believe how much better my stroke was after I lifted for a few years, even though muscle mass improved insignificantly. On the other hand, I can feel how swimming is soooo much better as a recovery particularly for the LB than the elliptical or running or even walking. I only wish I could do better scheduling. I still end up with too much land cardio.

    I have always loved kettlebells for dynamic training (that's so liberating to have this huge motions rather than limited ranges of the traditional training - in the rack, on the machine, in the lane, on the track... almost comparable to the outdoors x-country training), but only now dare to get into the explosive lifting, when I can get a PT to train me. Most of the explosive lifts are much harder to get right. Even the push-press took me a long time to 'get', and I am still thinking the PT won't be happy once I get back with him in March. The explosive lifts is my next training goal.
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
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  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I can feel how swimming is soooo much better as a recovery particularly for the LB than the elliptical or running or even walking. I only wish I could do better scheduling. I still end up with too much land cardio.
    I agree... I adore swimming. The lack of impact and gravity feels so liberating. I've only just joined the gym again but have done "sprints" in the pool for the last three days. Rip up and down the pool six times - feel totally exhilarated and free.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by happybunny View Post
    That's really interesting, FastCat. I never learned how to do the olympic lifts well, and they are harder to do without a gym, which I really don't have time for at this point. Would adding plyo exercises carry some of the same benefit as doing these kinds of lifts?
    most definitely; here are some gotos

    - airsquats
    - box jumps
    - plyo push ups

    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    This is brilliant Fast Cat - thanks!

    Have I got this right:

    Powerlifters - train non-explosively, look bigger, do not have fast twitch adaptions.
    Weightlifters - train explosively, are more powerful
    generally - yeah. I want to emphasize that powerlifters also have 'efficient' muscles - in that they are recruiting a high % of their muscle fibers and that they are strong as hell. They would probably have advantages over weightlifters in the realm of strongman style movements as these require massive strength ; the best strongmen will also be the most powerful (because they will be able to perform their tasks, event objectives the fastest).

    The weightlifter trains to perform for only a few instants (the duration of how long it takes to clean, jerk, snatch). The duration of a powerlifter's work is longer ie It takes much longer to perform a squat at 100% capacity than a snatch or jerk. The training of each as well as muscle adaptations are therefore different.

    Here's a little image

    Which of these athletes *look* stronger? Which of these athletes *are* stronger?


    That makes perfect sense. So someone who is doing a martial art for eg. might have smaller muscles to look at than a boydbuilder, but due to the explosive style of the training the muscles may be more fibrous, and therefore potentially heavier, and more powerful?
    *not* heavier. The muscle itself is no denser or heavier, at most they are more efficient - meaning that neurologically they are adapted to fire faster, more muscle fibers -- but the muscle ounce for ounce weighs the same. The difference between the two is that the bodybuilder is not training to be stronger or more powerful, he is training for more muscle *mass* - strength and power athletes are not attempting (solely like the bodybuilder) to add as much mass as possible, but rather be stronger, more powerful. There does reach the point where in order to become more powerful, stronger additional muscle mass is needed.

    Someone doing a martial art would put their body through a greater range of motion than someone doing weights, thereby creating more muscle fibres?
    er... that is a little too hyptothetical for my taste and no - additional range of motion for the sake of range of motion I would argue isn't as efficacious as training the universal strength and power facilitators: the core, the hips and legs. Raising a kettlebell behind your ear with one arm won't make you stronger than someone who instead spends their time squatting; the reverse actually. Though you will be much better at raising a kettlebell behind an ear than they will be.


    I will say that weightlifters have tremendous mobility. Try doing this. Or this.
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