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Thread: The Cost of Protein page 2

  1. #11
    calee's Avatar
    calee is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssn679doc View Post
    I was suprised at the cost of 85g of eggs.... until I looked at how many eggs it takes to get 85g. Since an egg has 6g of protein, it would take a little over a dozen eggs to get 85g. (I probably need to raise the price on my eggs, since I sell a dozen eggs from pastured free range chickens for < $3...)

    In your experient, are you going to spend your food dollars in propotion to the source of the nutrient in the diet? (ie 60% on fats, 25% on protein etc, or what ever your macro ratios are) Interest idea you have here!
    A dozen pastured eggs were selling for $7.50 at the farmers market this morning. But I imagine everything in the San Franciso area is priced higher.

  2. #12
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    Wow good luck with it. I can see it can be done.
    I would like to spend less on food ourselves, but I can't see where I can. I always buy grass fed hormone free ($400 f/n for 4 people, 2 are children and 2 cats and 2 dogs, incl eggs) Farm fruit and veg ($250 f/n, this includes 2 trays of eggs (30 per tray). $200 per f/n on supermarket items (toilet paper, olive oil, tuna, and the occasional fresh food, never meat). Ouch that is $1700 per month.
    Crazy! I must be able to cut down on that for sure.

  3. #13
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    Our eggs are $7 from the butcher for 30 free range, no grain fed chickens. I only go here once every 2 weeks, so sometimes I need to buy the more expensive eggs, as we go to the little farm weekly.
    From the little farm where we buy fruit and veg, they are $11 per tray of 30.

  4. #14
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    It is tough. The original list looked off to me, so I recalculated and added Whey Protein Powder. Squid, shrimp, and oysters are pretty much not going to be a regular item for someone living on $200 for food per month. Maybe as condiments, but they're too expensive per protein gram to be a staple.

    The cheapest source by far for carbs that I can find is rice. At about 7c per quarter cup (dry measure before cooking) it delivers between 35 and 40 grams of carb.

    If I want to avoid the two CAFO items, I can use the protein powder as a crutch for added protein. At 74c for 26 grams of protein, it comes in second least expensive to CAFO pork. And it's covered by EBT, so it's not a cheat.

    As I'm playing with this, and comparing what I'm paying now for food to what I paid when I ate all CAFO (except I knew the whole wild vs farmed salmon back then), it becomes apparent that whatever the govt uses to calculate includes all CAFO animal products and traditionally grown produce.

    I've got eight meals and/or protein combinations done with how much you'd have left over for all other food that day. I'm looking at 30-day months, so $200/month = $6.66 per day.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  5. #15
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    I'm surprised chicken livers are so high. I can get a rather large pack of them here for 2.5... but I'm not sure how it breaks down by weight.

  6. #16
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    Chicken livers here are less than $5 per kilo

    Is $200/mth a reasonable target? AFAIK, USA citizens spend the lowest percentage globally of their income on food. In part, that is due to subsidies on the major ingredients of processed foods and of the feed of factory farmed produce. To give up these products means giving up the benefits of the subsidies and accepting that you will spend more on food

    Not disparaging anyone here. We also have to recognise that the great economic superpower also has a high proportion of low income citizens compared to other first world countries
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  7. #17
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    Good project Joanie. Good luck with it. I've been eating primal for 7-8 months and still haven't figured out the economics of it.

    I suspect it's actually cheaper, as I am managing to shop for four now, when I was shopping for three before (on the same budgt of $NZ200 pw). I'm not sure how this can be but I think it's due to cooking from scratch.

    But it's more work, for the last two months I feel like I've done nothing but shop and cook for everyone.

  8. #18
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    I can get a rather large pack of them here for 2.5
    Chicken livers here are less than $5 per kilo
    Organic chicken livers where I live are $5/lb (2.2 lbs = 1 kilo). CAFO chicken livers are around $2/lb.

    Free range/pastured eggs are $5/doz, cage free (an almost useless term which only means access to outdoors) organic are $3/doz, and CAFO eggs are about $1.75/doz.

    Walmart CAFO ground beef 94/6 (complete with pink slime) is just under $4/lb; grass fed 95/5 ground beef is $8/lb.

    I'm only posting that to show the disparity in what I once considered my go-to cheap proteins.

    And an example of produce (only where I live and the country is very large and food prices vary quite a bit): conventionally grown russet potatoes are about 40cents/lb while organic russets sell for about $1.20/lb.

    The dairy hit: non-dairy coffee creamer/quart is ~$2.19, CAFO half and half $2.99, and pastured half and half is $3.99.

    Is $200/mth a reasonable target?
    I arbitrarily chose that number because it is the amount that the Fed'l Govt gives a single person household that qualifies for the food stamp program. Approximately 15% (a record high here) of our citizens participate in this program. As a note, the average benefit is $133 rather than the full $200 because it's a sliding scale based on income.

    Annieh, I agree that if a household were eating mostly prepared or semi-prepared foods, that might offset the cost of going from CAFO to organic/ranged/wild. And I've read here on the forum that people from other countries are a sometimes bit appalled that we have to actually look for grass fed/pastured animal products here in the states. But for someone like me who probably was already cooking in nine days out of 10, the switch from CAFO to better quality has certainly made a hit on the old food budget.

    From what I've worked out so far, if a person wanted to be 100% Primal (i.e., no CAFO products at all) on $200/month, they would be able to do so, but their variety would be limited, and they'd almost have to supplement with protein powder if they wanted more than one meal a day, a variety of vegetables, the occasional cup of coffee with butter or other dairy in it, etc. It would be austere, but I think it could be done.

    Also, while my reference point might be a bit higher than national average on prices because I'm an urban dweller, there are certainly areas where food is higher: NYC's five boroughs, Boston, Chicago, a lot of Hawaii and Alaska, San Francisco, are just off the top of my head - there are many more, I'm sure.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  9. #19
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    I notice your comment about not wanting to drive 50 miles to get pastured meat. While I totally agree that driving across town to save $2 is a waste, the travel can also be factored into the budget. Either this could become a family outing with a picnic along the way or you make a deal with yourself to save those miles some other way the rest of the month (carpooling, walking, taking the bus or skipping the outing that is farther away). When I buy in bulk, I get my pastured/ grass fed beef, bison, or yak meat for $6/lb. Considering the cost of many of the higher end cuts, I save big time. Plus happy food tastes better

    I love this project though as many people use cost as an excuse not to eat better. I could see this even becoming an e- book or something "The Primal Budget" with the "how to figure out the cost of your food" so that people can make better choices when money is tight. Those of us who do understand math/ money often forget that many people who are low income do not know how to figure this stuff out.

  10. #20
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    Wow, america is really cheap. I also eat on a budget and the only things I eat are eggs, ground beef, left over crumbled "crap" from the butcher, non-organic bananas and raw butter (super cheap compared to the calories you get from it!) And when I have the time I can cycle 1,5 hr to a farm to get raw milk at €0,50 per liter.
    I don't eat veggies, i get all my micronitrients from the left over crap (which is pretty much all organ), eggs and dairy
    Billie trips balls

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