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Thread: Inflammation Factor - I need to understand page

  1. #1
    primal_alex's Avatar
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    Question Inflammation Factor - I need to understand

    Primal Fuel
    Today I was playing with

    Nutrition facts, calories in food, labels, nutritional information and analysis – NutritionData.com

    Actually I was checking the macro/micro nutrients, vitamins, the breakdown of saturated/mono/polyinsaturated fats, and the inflammation factor of the foods I usually eat. And something is not clear... According to this website, which seems to be quite rigorous (I am also checking other sources to compare the data), onion, garlic, carrots, turmeric and ginger are highly anti-inflammatory. So far so good, we already knew and that's why we love them.

    But... some other ingredients which are very popular in the primal/paleo movement seem to be very inflammatory, some examples:

    - coconut oil
    - coconut milk
    - butter oil (ghee)
    - tapioca
    - ...

    I agree, I agree: we do not drink coconut oil. A normal dose is 7 grams on a frying pan to sauté 100 grams of onions, in the end the balance is positive. The dose makes the poison right? Right! Then coconut milk may be an issue: it's easy to drop 200ml into a sauce, or when preparing a coconut milk kefir.

    Tallow and lard are inflammatory, too, but much less compared to coconut oil and ghee. Oil of olive instead is anti-inflammatory, still nothing compared to the flaxseed oil (if it weren't for the fitoestrogens I would use it more often).

    Tapioca is very inflammatory (like almost anything starchy such as rice or potatoes), if used as a thickener it may not be an issue, but as a flour replacement... I'd rather avoid eating 100 grams of baked, rancid tapioca, wouldn't you?

    Another surprise, blueberries: according to the data they are slightly inflammatory. I agree that we eat blueberries for the anti-oxidant action which is something different, but then why not having strawberries instead (maybe less anti-oxidants, but mildly anti-inflammatory and half the sugars of blueberries)?

    Finally, and provided nutritiondata is correct, some good news: macadamias and brazil-nuts are powerful anti-inflammatory foods. I feel less guilty to have my handful of both of them almost every day.


    Any ideas? Where am I wrong?


    P.S. Just for fun, check soybean oil... use it as a jolly when discussing with a vegan

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    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
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    Nah the site uses faulty logic algorithms or whatever to come to crap conclusions. Their "inflammatory" data less than useless.

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    um coconut oil is anti-inflammatory

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Nah the site uses faulty logic algorithms or whatever to come to crap conclusions. Their "inflammatory" data less than useless.
    That entire "inflammatory index" is complete crap. It goes off of some book some lady wrote and uses a bunch of useless terms to define it.

    Hilarious that coconut oil is but flax seed which is basically paint thinner, isnt.

    In ending, pay no attention to it. Focus on vitamin/mineral content, saturated to polyunsaturated ratio and whatever macro you are trying to get/avoid. Or just eat real food.

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    I finally joined the site so I could reply to this thread because I ran into this nutrition tracker this week and was kind of boggled by some of its information. I had to look up a few things, then started testing it.

    Raspberries have too much sugar. So do blueberries. Well, what about boneless skinless chicken breasts? Too much cholesterol (huh??). Think you're safe having spinach? NOPE! It's high in sodium. Who knew? Delicious ribeye steak, on the other hand, somehow manages to be low in sodium, but no doubt it's evil in other ways. The various ribeye entries also disagree on how inflammatory it might be. This thing is not even close to consistent.

    I finally turned to kale. And indeed, raw kale had no negatives listed. However, a cup manages to have more sodium than a cup of saw spinach, yet somehow isn't a high sodium food.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Nah the site uses faulty logic algorithms or whatever to come to crap conclusions. Their "inflammatory" data less than useless.
    If only. The IF system is discussed here:

    Inflammation and Health

    ... which may itself use faulty calculations and come to crap conclusions, that I agree

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    thank you, It goes off of some book some lady wrote and uses a bunch of useless terms to define it. good idea,

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    Ok, I did some investigations. In the end the most obvious answer was the correct one: the Inflammation Factor Index calculated the way it is calculated there, is BS. Enjoy your coconut oil and milk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zach View Post
    That entire "inflammatory index" is complete crap. It goes off of some book some lady wrote and uses a bunch of useless terms to define it.

    Hilarious that coconut oil is but flax seed which is basically paint thinner, isnt.

    In ending, pay no attention to it. Focus on vitamin/mineral content, saturated to polyunsaturated ratio and whatever macro you are trying to get/avoid. Or just eat real food.
    Even a broken clock...

  10. #10
    SteveJohnson's Avatar
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    Coconut oil, coconut milk. butter oil (ghee), as does lard,IS inflammatory due to their higher Omega 6 content than omega 3. Tapioca is inflammatory due to it being a starch ... as DOES ALL STARCHES!

    HOWEVER, you really have to be judicious about where you get your information.
    Source: . . . . nutritiondata.self.com/ . . inflammationfactor.com/
    1 Tbsp coconut oil . . . . = -111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = -115
    1/2 C coconut milk . . . . = -217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = -239
    1 Tbsp butter oil. . . . . . = - 44 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = - 44
    1/3 C tapioca, pearl dry. = -234 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = -235

    WOW! Only 1 of the 4 items was correct!I I USED to use nutritiondata.self.com as a source but seeing how wrong they are, I think not. They JUST don't keep their info up-to-date.

    Compare the true inflammatory factors
    1/3 C tapioca, pearl dry. . = -235
    1/3 C Arrowroot Flour . . . = -189
    1/3 C Cornstarch . . . . . . = -216


    That is also why almost ALL potatoes are inflammatory, due to the starch.

    At least arrowroot is far healthier than its modern counterpart cornstarch. Cornstarch is basically devoid of nutrients, except for calories, calcium, and carbs. While arrowroot is less inflammatory, less calories, but more fiber, more calcium, more potassium, etc.

    I love coconut oil and take about 1/4 cup per day in my diet HOWEVER, I also make sure I have enough omega 3 to offset it's inflammatory effects. So the natives having fish and shrimp in coconut is a GOOD THING!
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    Last edited by SteveJohnson; 01-18-2014 at 01:13 AM.

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