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Thread: blood work help...hypothyroidism, t3, kidneys,& potassium? page

  1. #1
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    blood work help...hypothyroidism, t3, kidneys,& potassium?

    Primal Fuel
    I know these posts are annoying & yes I will be going to see my nutritionist this month but some insight & advice from other primal memebers is always nice..

    here are all the results from my recent lab work..
    I know the cholesterol is off but I'm not worried about that right now..I put **** by the 3 things that are off & worry me...
    My ?S are
    can fasting/being too low carb mess with your thyroid?
    how can i raise my thyroid without getting on meds for the rest of forever?
    how bad is having high potassium?
    do you think my kidneys going to take a dump on me?

    A bit about me...I have been fasting (from 9 pm to 3 pm) daily, have been low carb/primal for about 3 years (30-70 carbs a day) i take l carentine, l glutamine, & fish oil. here lately i've only been able to lift weights 2 times a week, run (4 miles) about 3 times a week, go on walks (2-4 miles, depending on his mood & the weather) with my husband in the evening 3-5 times a week, & I work an office job where i sit on my stationary bike & look at pinterest all day (the bike makes me feel better about being so stationary ha)
    i am 23, 132 pounds 5'4 female..I want to lose about 5-10 more pounds..

    I know it gets annoying when people get on here & pretty much say "hey be my doctor" but I would like to have a bit of personal insight from someone whos gona thru Thyroid issues before I go talk to my nutritionist & he puts on me a bunch of crazy supplements & powders like he did my mother in law...
    So yeah..any advice on hypothyroidism would be awesome.


    Test Description Result Range Units
    Thyroxine (T4)001149 11.8 4.5-12.0 ug/dL
    ****T3 Uptake001156 21 24-39 %
    Free Thyroxine Index001164 2.5 1.2-4.9
    TSH004264 2.6 0.450-4.500 uIU/mL

    Iron and TIBC
    Date Collected: 1/31/2013 7:40:00 AM

    Test Description Result Range Units
    Iron Bind.Cap.(TIBC)001347 369 250-450 ug/dL
    UIBC001348 275 150-375 ug/dL
    Iron Saturation011362 25 15-55 %

    Hgb A1c with eAG Estimation
    Date Collected: 1/31/2013 7:40:00 AM

    Test Description Result Range Units
    Hemoglobin A1c001464 4.8 4.8-5.6 %
    .
    Increased risk for diabetes: 5.7 - 6.4
    Diabetes: >6.4
    Glycemic control for adults with diabetes: <7.0

    Estim. Avg Glu (eAG)001471 91 mg/dL

    CMP14+LP+5AC+CBC/D/Plt
    Date Collected: 1/31/2013 7:40:00 AM

    Test Description Result Range Units
    Calcium, Serum001016 9.7 8.7-10.2 mg/dL
    Phosphorus, Serum001024 3.7 2.5-4.5 mg/dL
    Glucose, Serum001032 84 65-99 mg/dL
    BUN001040 16 6-20 mg/dL
    Uric Acid, Serum001057 4.6 2.5-7.1 mg/dL
    Therapeutic target for gout patients: <6.0

    Cholesterol, Total001065 215 100-189 mg/dL
    Protein, Total, Serum001073 7.2 6.0-8.5 g/dL
    Albumin, Serum001081 4.9 3.5-5.5 g/dL
    Bilirubin, Total001099 0.5 0.0-1.2 mg/dL
    Alkaline Phosphatase, S001107 36 25-150 IU/L
    LDH001115 131 0-214 IU/L
    AST (SGOT)001123 13 0-40 IU/L
    Triglycerides001172 71 0-114 mg/dL
    ****Potassium, Serum001180 5.4 3.5-5.2 mmol/L
    Sodium, Serum001198 144 134-144 mmol/L
    Chloride, Serum001206 103 97-108 mmol/L
    Iron, Serum001339 94 35-155 ug/dL
    Creatinine, Serum001370 0.73 0.57-1.00 mg/dL
    ALT (SGPT)001545 14 0-32 IU/L
    Carbon Dioxide, Total001578 23 20-32 mmol/L
    GGT001958 7 0-60 IU/L
    **Verified by repeat analysis**

    WBC005025 6.1 4.0-10.5 x10E3/uL
    RBC005033 4.67 3.77-5.28 x10E6/uL
    Hemoglobin005041 14.3 11.1-15.9 g/dL
    Hematocrit005058 42.7 34.0-46.6 %
    ****BUN/Creatinine Ratio011577 22 8-20
    HDL Cholesterol011817 74 >39 mg/dL
    According to ATP-III Guidelines, HDL-C >59 mg/dL is considered a
    negative risk factor for CHD.

    LDL/HDL Ratio011849 1.7 0.0-3.2 ratio units
    Estimated CHD Risk011858 < 0.5 0.0-1.0 times avg.
    T. Chol/HDL Ratio
    Men Women
    1/2 Avg.Risk 3.4 3.3
    Avg.Risk 5.0 4.4
    2X Avg.Risk 9.6 7.1
    3X Avg.Risk 23.4 11.0
    .
    The CHD Risk is based on the T. Chol/HDL ratio. Other
    factors affect CHD Risk such as hypertension, smoking,
    diabetes, severe obesity, and family history of pre-
    mature CHD.

    VLDL Cholesterol Cal011916 14 5-40 mg/dL
    Globulin, Total012039 2.3 1.5-4.5 g/dL
    A/G Ratio012047 2.1 1.1-2.5
    LDL Cholesterol Calc012054 127 0-119 mg/dL
    MCV015065 91 79-97 fL
    MCH015073 30.6 26.6-33.0 pg
    MCHC015081 33.5 31.5-35.7 g/dL
    Neutrophils015107 62 40-74 %
    Immature Granulocytes015108 0 0-2 %
    Lymphs015123 31 14-46 %
    Monocytes015131 6 4-13 %
    Eos015149 1 0-7 %
    Basos015156 0 0-3 %
    Platelets015172 216 140-415 x10E3/uL
    Neutrophils (Absolute)015909 3.8 1.8-7.8 x10E3/uL
    Immature Grans (Abs)015911 0 0.0-0.1 x10E3/uL
    Lymphs (Absolute)015917 1.9 0.7-4.5 x10E3/uL
    Monocytes(Absolute)015925 0.4 0.1-1.0 x10E3/uL
    Eos (Absolute)015933 0.1 0.0-0.4 x10E3/uL
    Baso (Absolute)015941 0 0.0-0.2 x10E3/uL
    T. Chol/HDL Ratio100065 2.9 0.0-4.4 ratio units
    eGFR If NonAfricn Am100791 116 >59 mL/min/1.73
    eGFR If Africn Am100797 134 >59 mL/min/1.73
    RDW105007 13.8 12.3-15.4 %

  2. #2
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    sorry the results are kind of hard to read...hope this all makes some sense..

  3. #3
    EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Where did you get the bloodwork done? When my doc does my bloodwork, she also explains it all to me, especially any items of concern. If you had the bloodwork done at a doctor's office, they should take the time to discuss it with you.

    I have Hashimotos Thyroiditis and am more than willing to discuss Hypothyroidism if you have any questions specifically about that. I'm not qualified to read your blood panel, however.

    FWIW, I had zero luck with doctors and my Hashi's until I switched to a Naturopathic Physician. Naturopathic Doctors and Holistic Doctors and Integrative Medicine Specialists will tend to focus more on root cause (and the treatment thereof). Other doctors tend to focus on symptoms and symptom control, which doesn't usually address root cause so you never get better. If you aren't happy with your doctor, look around for a doctor that uses a different approach. Note that I'm generalizing- I have met the occasional DO or MD that uses an integrative approach, but it's rare.
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    Primal Start Date: 11/26/2012

  4. #4
    Zach's Avatar
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    Certainly looks like you have a t3 conversion issue. Sugar is needed to create t3 from t4 and there are a lot of people who see hypothyroid symptoms appear on a low carb diet.

    You may want to try upping your carb intake and lowering protein.

  5. #5
    Zach's Avatar
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    Also check out the work of Ray Peat (raypeat.com) and Danny Roddy (dannyroddy.com).

  6. #6
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    First, the only test that you had done that actually measures thyroid hormones is Thyroxine (T4). Your result is at the top of the range--11.8 with the top of the normal range being 12. The test you had (T4) is the mesaure of both bound and unbound T4.

    Free Thyroxine Index is an out dated test. It is an estimate of the amount of circulating free thyroxine. FreeT4 is a better test as it is a direct measure of circulating free thyroxine.

    T3 Uptake is another outdated test. It is an indirect measure of binding proteins. Testing T3, especially free T3, would be the test to have to measure T3, the active thyroid hormone. Total T3 measures both bound and unbound hormone. freeT3 measures unbound (usable) T3.

    Things that can bind thyroid hormone include BC pills, HRT. Things that inhibit T4 to T3 conversion include:
    1. Low selenium, need 200mcg
    2. Low ferritin
    3. Low Vitamin D
    4. Stress
    5. Overtraining, undereating
    6. VLC-- for some people

    The question I have is- Are you having symptoms of hypothyroidism? If so what are they?

  7. #7
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    I got the blood work done thru healthcheckusa..I am inbetween drs right now & have been having a few hypo symptoms (always cold, thin hair that keeps falling out, brain fog) so I went ahead & got it done while it was cheap so I could have it to take with me whenever I do find a new dr, so he has some what of an idea of what I'm starting with. I started low carb because I was told I was pre-diabetic & had PCOS.. my thyroid results at the time were a bit low, but all in range & have gotten worse each time I've gotten work done..but of course anytime I show my blood work to a Dr, all they see is the cholesterol & never give me much advice on the other issues.

    I think for now I am going to quit fasting, add some more carbs (fruits & more squashes) & quit taking the l carentine & maybe start vitiman D..I plan on seeing the nutrionalist in March or April.

    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    First, the only test that you had done that actually measures thyroid hormones is

    Thyroxine (T4). Your result is at the top of the range--11.8 with the top of the normal range being 12. The test you had (T4) is the mesaure of both bound and unbound T4.

    Free Thyroxine Index is an out dated test. It is an estimate of the amount of circulating free thyroxine. FreeT4 is a better test as it is a direct measure of circulating free thyroxine.

    T3 Uptake is another outdated test. It is an indirect measure of binding proteins. Testing T3, especially free T3, would be the test to have to measure T3, the active thyroid hormone. Total T3 measures both bound and unbound hormone. freeT3 measures unbound (usable) T3.

    Things that can bind thyroid hormone include BC pills, HRT. Things that inhibit T4 to T3 conversion include:
    1. Low selenium, need 200mcg
    2. Low ferritin
    3. Low Vitamin D
    4. Stress
    5. Overtraining, undereating
    6. VLC-- for some people

    The question I have is- Are you having symptoms of hypothyroidism? If so what are they?

  8. #8
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    I guess what really makes me mad is the potassium..I have been eating a lot of avocados & big salads, especially that week I got the blood work done, but I dont think it would cause that much of a rise? I had never really thought of too much potassium being bad? My diet is pretty much meat & veggies & it seems like by keeping it that way, I'm able to lose weight, but I mess up something else inside me along the way. ughh.

  9. #9
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    You're barely above the top end for potassium. Your test was a snapshot of one day of your life. It may not even be where your potassium level lies day after day.

    I'd look at the list marcadev posted. You could be overtrained. It sounds like you exercise a lot of slow cardio practically all the time (run, walk, stationary bike). You might be able to rev yourself up a bit with some high impact interval stuff and maybe a slight increase in carbs to help you recover from it. And then let yourself actually recover. You don't need to be riding a bike all day long at work in addition to the running and walking and weights to stay slim.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  10. #10
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    Are you taking any magnesuim?

    Natural ways to lower the Potassium would be to:
    - increase your calcuim intake
    - increase your Magnesuim
    - eat more garlic
    - take Licorice (herb)

    Elevated potassium can cause:
    • Paralysis
    • Renal necrosis
    • Heart arrhythmia
    • Diarrhoea
    • Convulsions
    • Depression
    • Mental confusion
    • Tingling
    • Kidney failure
    • Dehydration
    • Adrenal exhaustion
    • Weakness
    • Fever

    I wouldn't give up on your vegetables. Sometimes, what you've eaten for the 2 weeks before you get your blood drawn can effect the levels of certain tests.

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