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    jodeyh's Avatar
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    Attaining the correct body pH...how does one do this?

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    My son and I were at the chiropractor yesterday and he had us put these little pH tester papers in our mouths. We both turned out to be at around 6.5-7, which he said was too acidic. How do we get from where we are to where we need to be?

    I eat a completely primal diet, but we can't afford grass fed/pastured meats and eggs. I buy almost exclusively organic fruits and veggies (unless they aren't available).

    I take 3g of fish oil a day, as well as a host of other supplements.

    What am I missing?

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    Zach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jodeyh View Post
    My son and I were at the chiropractor yesterday and he had us put these little pH tester papers in our mouths. We both turned out to be at around 6.5-7, which he said was too acidic. How do we get from where we are to where we need to be?

    I eat a completely primal diet, but we can't afford grass fed/pastured meats and eggs. I buy almost exclusively organic fruits and veggies (unless they aren't available).

    I take 3g of fish oil a day, as well as a host of other supplements.

    What am I missing?
    Saliva tests are the most inaccurate form for testing PH but even still, you are close to perfect. I believe 7.36 or something is perfect blood PH and 7 is neutral. The only thing to worry about would be being really low or really high. Also PH fluctuates throughout the day.

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    peril's Avatar
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    Your body regulates blood pH to within a very narrow band. On this point at least, your naturopath is practising quackery
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    You do not need to worry about body pH. The body's blood system is narrow and self-regulating. Your chiropractor is neither a doctor nor a dietitian and you shouldn't listen to him or her re: dietary advice. You do not need organic or grass fed unless you can afford it, you're doing fine on primal, stop worrying.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

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    I think we all agree your PH is fine. Some doctors of chiropractic have extensive training in nutrition, and are holistic doctors for certain. But there may be others holistic practitioners that rely on these out dated tests to make recommendations like "so eat more vegetables". If so its as bad as your medical doctor making recommendations on just a a total cholesterol number. Simply no good.

    All chiropractors receive training in nutrition. However, a chiropractic doctor that has more extensive expertise in nutrition should have a certificate displayed from either a "functional medicine" program or a diplomat in clinical nutrition indicating 300+ hours of continuing education in that field. Another good sign is if they have certification as CCWP (certified chiropractic wellness practitioner). The CCWP's nutritional component is essentially paleo plus. So very Primal oriented practitioners.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 02-03-2013 at 07:21 AM.

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    I'm a student of Chinese medicine and run into this from ND's occasionally. It is based on an old theory and while there is tiny something to it, a saliva test is not a good indicator. The body keeps PH in a very tight range.

    The current (and I believe more valid) theory is acidity is actually inflammation. You may very well be inflamed but C-RP, glucose test and physical indicators are better indicators.

    Unless you have high levels of inflammation, you don't need the fish oil. (FCLO nonwithstanding) It's really only useful for short-term use, like up to a year. You are better off eating salmon. Eat more veggies.

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    Thanks for all the replies. At this point, I've lost a little over 40lbs in the past 8 months, but still have quite a bit to go to reach optimum health (read around 100lbs). I've not been able to exercise in about 3 months due to SI joint injuries (from exercise...) and a stress fractured foot, then illness.

    My concern with not eating grass fed/finished or pastured meats is the Omega 6 levels.

    I'm not terribly worried about what the chiro said about pH, but it did pique my interest and did make me wonder if I was missing something in my diet.

    I don't know what my inflammation levels are...I'm pre-diabetic, but all my blood markers are headed in the right direction, with the exception of LDL, which has consistently gone up since going Primal. It was measured at 151 back in 12/12. Since Dec, I've started taking supplements to see if I can lower that number (as well as supplements for other things that I'm trying out). I refuse statins on a regular basis from my primary care, who offers them every single time I see her. Sigh.

    A1C and C peptide are elevated, but I'm not taking medication anymore. I'm controlling purely by diet, by choice. I don't see any tests for CRP in my records, so no hard evidence there.

    So as long as fish oil isn't a bad idea, and there's the possibility that it's doing my body good (since I HATE eating fish, other than tuna, which I rarely eat b/c of mayo and its gross ingredients), I think I should keep taking it.
    Last edited by jodeyh; 02-04-2013 at 03:20 PM.

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    fish oil pills are fine.

    I use Green Pastures Blue Ice Fermented Skate Liver Oil non-gelatin capsules (orange flavor). Two capsules is a serving, and there is a month's worth in a bottle. It costs $55 NZD for the bottle. They gave us skate by accident, rather than cod, so next month I'll get cod.

    I eat fish three times a week, plus take the daily fish oil, and then the meats here are usaully grass fed/etc -- so it's not an issue here. But, in the US, you eat what you can afford and the best quality that you can get. ok?

    Also, you can do flax oil, which is high in omega 3 as well. Do some reading up on the subject to see how much you, specifically, might need.

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    Also, consider exercising in a pool. if you can walk in a pool, it'll take a load off the joints, and also get you a lot of exercise. DH and I do "pool running" once a week when we take our DS to the pool. all three of us 'race' -- but he swims of course!

    Wear as much clothing as you want in the pool. It's ok to be overweight and exercise in a way that feels comfortable for you. My dad, who is obese and also has foot problems, had a lot of issues around going to the pool because of bathing suits. I told him to wear his t-shirt and sweats, and he'll be just fine. And he did, and now he walks at the pool 2-3x a week for an hour. The clothing creates more drag, so he's working harder, and it's helped his joints and he's loosing some weight too!

    You might also consider a good yoga class. Overweight people are welcome and usually have a lot of ability that they don't realize -- so don't be intimidated by 'skinny people' or bendy poses or whatever in the room, ok? Talk to your teacher about SI issues and foot issues before class (if possible, send an email and ask to meet about 15-20 minutes before class, explaining your specific problems in the email). S/he should be able to give you alternatives if you are hurting. And, in every yoga class, you only do what you can. I do not recommend starting with hot yoga styles, though, as they tend to not like to adapt to special needs (and/or don't know how) in my experience.

    Good luck! 40 lbs is a long way! So congrats on your current success!

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