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Thread: Look out america........................ page 6

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
    Thanx Calee - great suggestion.
    crabs - I am sure that I will have heaps of questions as they arise - however........

    we are going on a 1 week cruise around Alaska - to begin. I am sure that my eating will be well catered for...then we get ourselves from Vancouver to Seattle.
    Do we take the bus, train ?????
    In Seattle we pick up the rental car.
    I have said to DH that I refuse to drive on the WRONG side of the road. In NZ we are used to driving on the correct side, not the right side LOL
    We have already bought the Tomtom thingy on the internet to get us around America - so that is sorted.
    Then we drive from Seattle to Indiana - no small feat.... and we are farmers, so we would like to take the byway - not the highway. Where does one stay. What small town motels are nice, but not too expensive ?????
    more questions to come
    From Seattle, check out the Yellowstone Trail Road. This road runs from Puget Sound (Seattle, Wa) to Plymouth Rock (Plymouth, MA). Thus, it will get you to Indian in the northern most -- and a truly exciting rural, American west experience.

    This road hasn't been incorporated/modernized like the Lincoln Highway -- another fabulous way to see the US, as the Old Lincoln Highway still exists to be used as well as the modern one, which sometimes just sits along sides, and sometimes moves off for better engineered spaces. After you kick through Idaho, you could kick into Utah and pick up the Lincoln to Indiana as well. Also, you'll be seeing the North East, my IMO, it's not nearly as exciting as the states in the Yellowstone Trail (not to mention the fact that you see Yellowstone!).

    Along these old routes, there are still many old fashioned hotels still in use, as it is becoming quite popular to follow these roads. You might also be able to get cabins in the state parks -- which will be basically furnished with pots/pans, etc -- but it's like hosteling in that you bring your own linens and food, etc. If you hit up a tip shop in Seattle, you'll probably find cheap linens that you can take with you.

    This route is on one of my "must do" lists -- like Route 66, and the rest of the lincoln highway (i've done east coast to chicago). When DS is older, we plan on campervaning our way around on the old roads.

  2. #52
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    Jac
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    Hell yeah - I've never been in a mosh pit, but as long as the band is good, we'd be the hottest old chicks there
    Started Feb 18 2011

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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoebird View Post
    From Seattle, check out the Yellowstone Trail Road. This road runs from Puget Sound (Seattle, Wa) to Plymouth Rock (Plymouth, MA). Thus, it will get you to Indian in the northern most -- and a truly exciting rural, American west experience.

    This road hasn't been incorporated/modernized like the Lincoln Highway -- another fabulous way to see the US, as the Old Lincoln Highway still exists to be used as well as the modern one, which sometimes just sits along sides, and sometimes moves off for better engineered spaces. After you kick through Idaho, you could kick into Utah and pick up the Lincoln to Indiana as well. Also, you'll be seeing the North East, my IMO, it's not nearly as exciting as the states in the Yellowstone Trail (not to mention the fact that you see Yellowstone!).

    Along these old routes, there are still many old fashioned hotels still in use, as it is becoming quite popular to follow these roads. You might also be able to get cabins in the state parks -- which will be basically furnished with pots/pans, etc -- but it's like hosteling in that you bring your own linens and food, etc. If you hit up a tip shop in Seattle, you'll probably find cheap linens that you can take with you.

    This route is on one of my "must do" lists -- like Route 66, and the rest of the lincoln highway (i've done east coast to chicago). When DS is older, we plan on campervaning our way around on the old roads.
    Thanx Zoes - I will have to do some homework on these ones
    "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

    ...small steps....

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac View Post
    Hell yeah - I've never been in a mosh pit, but as long as the band is good, we'd be the hottest old chicks there
    I believe that its quite dangerous, however you being the nurse, me being ex ambulance - we could pick each other up, and dust each other off??????? sounds like a plan - however I don't think that Gwumpy Gwandad - the handbrake - would be up for it !!!!!!!

    and I will have to ask Mr. Perf how one dresses for the occassion !!!!!!!
    "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

    ...small steps....

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
    Next question - I do not understand the tipping system.

    Typically, you tip 15% of the total bill. In Philly, we tip 18-20%, but we are the highest tippers in the country.

    The factor is pretty easy.

    If the bill at the restaurant comes to $15.67, then 10% is 1.56 (or $1.60 since I round), and then you half it ($.80), and add it together ($2.40). That's a quick way to "eyeball" the tip. I think philadelphians tip higher because it's easier to just double the 10% ($3.20).

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
    okay so another question would be....
    ... what brands of common foods are reputable ???? I am sure they will be different to NZ brands............
    ie - people talk about kerrygold butter - is that a brand of butter ?????
    Jerky ? Nuts ? etc....
    and another............
    What restaurants would offer decent primal fare ???
    Just read the labels for ingredients, and then you'll discover which are better than others. We do this no matter what (rather than buying by brands). You'll find a lot of different jerkies out west -- instead of looking for name brands, try to find whatever is locally made. There are lots of treasures in these various rural areas. Particularly if you do something as awesome as the Yellowstone Trail.

    Just do your best when on the road. My own take on it is to just eat what is available and get a real flavor of the area. I love a "greasy spoon" or roadside diner -- primal be damned. Also, chicken and rib joints, there will probably be lots of those as well. I love good BBQ (and north western BBQ is different than other flavors across the US, so don't be afraid to try the road-side joint with a funny name. If they have a smoker or are selling BBQ -- no matter how dodgy the place looks -- you are probably finding a gem.

    I found this place on the Lincoln in PA that was literally in the middle of nowhere. Home made North Eastern style BBQ chicken that you would DIE for plus home-cut shoestring french fries (chips) -- one serving was as big as a cafeteria tray! Then the simple PA-dutch style cole slaw was too phenominal! I think I ate enough for 4 people in one sitting.

    And, it literally looked like *nothing* from the road. Not even a restaurant. But some of the best food I've ever eaten (and I've eaten some good food).

    Don't be afraid to explore non-chain restaurants, and dont' be too strict on the primal since you are on holiday and experiencing american cuisine -- particularly if you are NOT going to chain restaurants and are going back roads.

  7. #57
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    BTW, I love knit/crochet blankets. DS was given one as a baby, and I love it. We use it a ton. It's just warm enough and just cool enough. It's always perfect -- any season. I don't know how that works that way, btu it does.

  8. #58
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    By the by, parts of the Yellowstone trail are not maintained, so you may need to find follow-by roads. I would contact the people at the web site to find out how to follow along the trail. There's apparently a route map or similar published in 2009, and another route map of wisconsin published annually.

    the Lincoln highway is quite well taken care of, so it' may be a more viable option.

    Another option would be to kick south-east through Washington and Idaho, heading through Utah or Wyoming and into Colorado and pick up the National Old Trails Road in the southeastern corner, which does go to Indiana (via Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois). I've done much of this route, and it was ok. Lots of flat lands and then some rolly polly hills. Rural for sure, and a bit off the beaten track. Not nearly as nice as the Lincoln, imo.

    That being said, you could have a truly thrilling ride through the US on your way to that National Old Trails road following the National Park-to-Park highway running from Mt Rainier (seattle) down to Rocky Mountain park/Denver (Colorado).
    Last edited by zoebird; 02-01-2013 at 06:39 PM.

  9. #59
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    Hey Gwamma, easiest way to tip is just double the tax and then round up.

    Years ago my mom hosted a Japanese exchange student. I can't imagine that she would ever expect a gift for doing it. Just hosting the student was the gift. But it's very sweet of you to want to crochet a blanket. I'm sure it would be appreciated.
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  10. #60
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    Consider looked for west coast restaurants on Yelp.com. You can search for words like gluten, organic, etc. to help you find better options. If you came down to Portland, you could visit our paleo food carts and paleo-inspired restaurant. :-)

    Picking up food in Seattle to travel with, like nuts, seeds, jerkey, cheese, etc, would be a really good idea.

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