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  1. #1
    Cryptocode's Avatar
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    Question Lift Heavy Things - Really?

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    Hi, I'm new at this and need advice.

    I've been on PB 2.5 months. I was very sick before. Now I'm gaining enough strength and energy to be interested in adding some exercise to my nutrician. So I'm going to start walking slowly, for fairly short distances. I have a cardio machine I can run on when I get to that place.

    I've never done regular, planned exercises and know little about it. I've done the things I loved doing: Competitive swimming and hrose-back riding, jumping, 3-day eventing; running, playing, etc.

    My question is about lifting heavy things. I'm 75 and have osteoperosis, although I'll know in another week if I'm over that now. But I've also shrunk already from 5' 9.75" to 5'8" and I don't want to encourage any more shrinking. I've been told, and understand, that it's not my bones that are shrinking but the discs inbetween the vertabra of my backbone, due simply to gravity. In addition my back is not strong. A great chiropractor has kept it in good shape though.

    It seems to me that if my back muscles were stronger I'd shrink less. But lifting heavy things sounds like it would make it worse.

    Advice?

  2. #2
    Knifegill's Avatar
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    Just start with the movements, no weights. If you are a strong walker, then work on assisted squats and wall-pushups. Mark's fitness plan starts from 0, so following that is a good guideline. Check with a physical therapist who knows your body, perhaps the chiropractor if he/she is legit, to make sure any past injuries or breaks need to be healed before doing certain movements. Some people just lift soup cans at first - I don't know how much muscle you have to gain or how much you regularly lift in normal life, so it's hard to just toss numbers at you. How much do you normally lift, jugs of water, etc., throughout your day?

    But, yes, lifting weights without proper nutrition could make your joints worse. Lifting weights correctly with good bone broth and organ meats should only stop degeneration and rebuild tissues, assuming you are digesting normally, etc.


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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Here are a couple of really good articles on why lifting heavy is good for us older people.
    Starting Strength: Article
    Starting Strength: Article
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  4. #4
    Cryptocode's Avatar
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    Thank you both. I'll give it a try.

    Do you know of any exercizes to strengthen the back muscles along the spine?

  5. #5
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Deadlift does that.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  6. #6
    Violette_R's Avatar
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    Clear it with your doctor but I seem to recall reading about how weightlifting is great for osteoporosis because it strengthens the bones.

  7. #7
    arthurb999's Avatar
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    Start SLOW and LIGHT.

    Hire a personal trainer who works with seniors or some sort of physical therapist to get you started and follow thier program. Do you plan on going to a gym or working out at home?

  8. #8
    Cryptocode's Avatar
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    Well, after this advice, I think I'll go to a gym and work with a trainer.

  9. #9
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    well. seem to recall reading about how weightlifting is great for osteoporosis because it strengthens the bones.

  10. #10
    Ripped's Avatar
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    Here's a good question to ask yourself:
    Am I still strong? Or is my strength decreasing?

    Remember that the principal of "use it or lose it" always applies. This is what makes the difference between folks who stay strong as they age and folks who do not. This is what makes the difference between folks who can't walk up the stairs when they're older and folks who are still active.

    And this is why weight training is even more important as you age.

    But I wouldn't try to do too many sessions though. 1-2 heavy sessions per week will be plenty. It's good for you because it makes you stronger. But intense training also taxes your immune system. So for that reason, you have to balance you out. And that's why I wouldn't recommend anymore than 2 heavy workouts per week. On the side, you can do any sort of walking or what ever.

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