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    YogaBare's Avatar
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    Half leg of lamb - is it a waste to use it for bone broth?

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    Still reasonably new to cooking meat and I've never braved a lamb leg before!

    Would you consider it a waste to use a half lamb leg (meat and all) just to make bone broth? If I ate the meat separately I don't think there'd be enough just in the bone to make the soup.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

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    Bone broth is generally made from just the bones
    I think if you eat the meat first, you would be fine.

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    Ah, not in Poland My mum uses the whole cut when she does broth.

    But I reckon half a bone would be too little for one batch of broth anyway, no?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    maybe, I have not made lamb broth, I do chicken just from the carcass.
    I think if there isn't too much water, it could still work. But i guess if you are worried, just use the meat too.

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    peril's Avatar
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    No problem using the whole cut to make soup. It just won't really be bone broth, just lamb soup
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    When I make myself beef shank, I use a covered clay cooker in the oven. Just the shank, water (enough to cover the shank), some onion, and a small bit of vinegar. The result (after about 90-120 minutes at about 275-300F) is a tender shank with a lot of liquid left in the bottom. Amazingly, when I cool down that liquid, a terrific amount of gelatin forms.

    Your half leg is larger than my usually 1 to 1.5 pound shank, so you might try cooking lower and slower. Uncover for the last 20 minutes.
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    Why not roast the lamb, eat the meat and make broth with the bones / left over bits? If you just cover the bones with water and pressure cook for about 40 minutes you will get plenty of flavour out of it to make some soup with. If you know your butcher well, ask if he has any other lamb bones to put in with it.

    No way would I "waste" a lamb joint and not eat it as meat!

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    Thanks everyone!

    Quote Originally Posted by breadsauce View Post
    No way would I "waste" a lamb joint and not eat it as meat!
    Ha, yeah exactly... my gut instinct too

    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    When I make myself beef shank, I use a covered clay cooker in the oven. Just the shank, water (enough to cover the shank), some onion, and a small bit of vinegar. The result (after about 90-120 minutes at about 275-300F) is a tender shank with a lot of liquid left in the bottom. Amazingly, when I cool down that liquid, a terrific amount of gelatin forms.

    Your half leg is larger than my usually 1 to 1.5 pound shank, so you might try cooking lower and slower. Uncover for the last 20 minutes.
    Amazing - this is the perfect compromise Thanks Joanie!
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    If you left the meat on the bone and simmered it long enough to get any of the benefits of bone broth - the meat would be way over cooked. You can always add the meat back later

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    yeah,I think if there isn't too much water, it could still work. But i guess if you are worried, just use the meat too.

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