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Thread: Barley and Millet page

  1. #1
    Acteon's Avatar
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    Barley and Millet

    Hello,

    I am halfway through the book the Primal Blueprint. The book states that grains among other things cause a huge insulin response in the body.

    So I looked at how much sugar there was in a cup of Barley on this website:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/c...d-pasta/5680/2

    It says that there are 44 g of carbs and 0 grams of sugar. Further down in the carbohydrates section it says 0.4 g of sugar. Versus a cup of celeri which has 3 g of carbs and 2 g of sugars:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/v...roducts/2396/2

    If a cup barley only has 0.4g of sugars how can it cause a huge insulin surge ? Is it the carbs that get broken down into sugars ?

    I even found this website:
    http://www.barleyfoods.org/nutrition.html
    It recommends barley for people with diabetes it says:
    Research shows that barley beta-glucan soluble fiber promotes healthy blood sugar by slowing glucose absorption. For example, findings from a clinical trial published in the December 2006 edition of Nutrition Research showed that mildly insulin-resistant men who ate muffins containing barley beta-glucan soluble fiber experienced significant reductions in glucose and insulin responses, compared to responses after eating muffins made with corn starch.
    I found similar stats for the grain Millet and for Quinoa although Quinoa has starches.

    I've been making veggie smoothies in the morning with veggies & nuts with ingredients like: Spinach, Cabbage, Celery, Cucumber, sweet peppers, Sesame seeds, flax seeds, Perilla seeds, chia seeds, Goji berries, A tablespoon of Wheat germ, Bee Pollen, Whole Orange or Lime (with skin). I also put in a cup grain milk made from Barley, Quinoa and Brown rice. The grain milk represents 12.5 % of the total veggie shake. I haven't experienced insulin crashes from this kind of shake. (Only when I put in dates and/or figs).

    Wikipedia says something to the effect that Barley has been consumed by humans since 17,000 B.C well within the Primal Blueprint range of 10,000 BC.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barley
    Last edited by Acteon; 04-24-2010 at 10:43 AM. Reason: Added sentence, corrected spelling.

  2. #2
    Pantera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acteon View Post
    Hello,

    I am halfway through the book the Primal Blueprint. The book states that grains among other things cause a huge insulin response in the body.

    So I looked at how much sugar there was in a cup of Barley on this website:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/c...d-pasta/5680/2

    It says that there are 44 g of carbs and 0 grams of sugar. Further down in the carbohydrates section it says 0.4 g of sugar. Versus a cup of celeri which has 3 g of carbs and 2 g of sugars:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/v...roducts/2396/2

    If a cup barley only has 0.4g of sugars how can it cause a huge insulin surge ? Is it the carbs that get broken down into sugars ?

    I even found this website:
    http://www.barleyfoods.org/nutrition.html
    It recommends barley for people with diabetes it says:


    I found similar stats for the grain Millet and for Quinoa although Quinoa has starches.

    I've been making veggie smoothies in the morning with veggies & nuts with ingredients like: Spinach, Cabbage, Celery, Cucumber, sweet peppers, Sesame seeds, flax seeds, Perilla seeds, chia seeds, Goji berries, A tablespoon of Wheat germ, Bee Pollen, Whole Orange or Lime (with skin). I also put in a cup grain milk made from Barley, Quinoa and Brown rice. The grain milk represents 12.5 % of the total veggie shake. I haven't experienced insulin crashes from this kind of shake. (Only when I put in dates and/or figs).

    Wikipedia says something to the effect that Barley has been consumed by humans since 17,000 B.C well within the Primal Blueprint range of 10,000 BC.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barley
    Dude, the faster you accept that grains are bad for you, the easier this will be. Responses:

    - Sugar: carbs get broken down into sugar when digested.
    - Barley vs corn starch: while that may be true, it's irrelevant. You want to avoid both. Barley may cause a slightly lower insulin spike than corn does. But guess what? Barley will still cause a huge insulin spike when compared to real food.
    - Consumption of barley at 17,000 BC is irrelevant. 20,000 thousand years are not enough for our species to adapt to some food.
    - About your shakes: avoid the rice, seeds, wheat and grain milk. Eat meat and healthy fats instead.

  3. #3
    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter how many of them are "sugars." Carbs are carbs are carbs, and your body can't tell the difference between flour and sucrose.

    Ditch the grains and opt for a veggie.

  4. #4
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    Because the "44 g of carbs" equals 44 grams of sugar since the carbs are made up of sugar. http://retrospectivecaveman.blogspot...-good-for.html
    Ism's in my opinion are not good. A person should not believe in an -ism, he should believe in himself. I quote John Lennon, "I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me."--Ferris Bueller, 1986
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    I set up a Facebook Group for all those who are eating and living Paleo/Primal

  5. #5
    Acteon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pantera View Post
    - About your shakes: avoid the rice, seeds, wheat and grain milk. Eat meat and healthy fats instead.
    Seeds can be digested raw by humans (they aren't the same as grains) and are primal. Even Chimps eat seeds in the wild.

    http://www.allaboutwildlife.com/what-do-chimps-eat

    Chia seeds were consumed raw by Native Americans when they had to travel large distances and are a good source of Omega 3's. Perilla seeds have been in use in Japan as a spice (it tastes like Anise) and has an even better ratio of Omega 3 / Omega 6 than Flax seeds do. The book does recommend increasing Omega 3's.
    Last edited by Acteon; 04-25-2010 at 10:14 AM.

  6. #6
    Pantera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acteon View Post
    Seeds can be digested raw by humans (they aren't the same as grains) and are primal. Even Chimps eat seeds in the wild.

    http://www.allaboutwildlife.com/what-do-chimps-eat

    Chia seeds were consumed raw by Native Americans when they had to travel large distances and are a good source of Omega 3's. Perilla seeds have been in use in Japan as a spice (it tastes like Anise) and has an even better ratio of Omega 3 / Omega 6 than Flax seeds do. The book does recommend increasing Omega 3's.
    If you want to eat seeds, go ahead. But there are flaws in your reasoning:

    a) Chimps do X: irrelevant. Chimps are a separate species and have evolved separately from humans for more than 2 million years.
    b) Seeds can be digested: so can grains. That doesn't mean they don't have chemical protections against being eaten.
    c) Perilla seeds in Japan: since when? Remember that 20,000 years is not enough time.
    d) Native Americans: these peoples have been in their territory for ~ 20,000 years. Not enough to adapt. And if you are not of Native American origin, your ancestors have been exposed to these foods for a meager 520 years at the most.

    The book recommends Omega 3s: true. But experts, including Mark, have recently revised their position on flax as a good source of omegas. A couple of links for you to consider:

    Mark on flax
    Cordain on flax
    The bottom line from an evolutionary perspective is that flax seeds and/or flax seed oil would not have been consumed by pre-agricultural humans.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pantera View Post
    If you want to eat seeds, go ahead. But there are flaws in your reasoning:

    a) Chimps do X: irrelevant. Chimps are a separate species and have evolved separately from humans for more than 2 million years.
    Chimps descend from a common ancestor that ate seeds and has been eating seeds for a long time. Chimps never stopped being primal.

    Humans have 23 chromosomes because at some point something caused 2 pairs of ape chromosomes to fuse.
    http://www.thetech.org/genetics/ask.php?id=229

    Humans share 96% of their DNA with Chimps:
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...imp_genes.html


    As a similar example, Asian elephants are a different species from the two species of African elephants but they eat similar foods. From frozen specimens we also have an idea of what the wholly mammoth ate. As another example, Zebras and Horses and donkeys while they are separate species eat the same kinds of foods.

    Humans exploring new unfamiliar lands most likely paid attention to what the other primates in the area ate to have an idea of what was safe to eat.

    One important difference we have with chimps is our Amylase production in our saliva :

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amylase

    Carbohydrates are an energy rich food source. Amylase is thought to have played a key role in human evolution in allowing humans an alternative to fruit and protein. A duplication of the pancreatic amylase gene developed independently in humans and rodents, further suggesting its importance. The salivary amylase levels found in the human lineage are six to eight times higher in humans than in chimpanzees, which are mostly fruit eaters and ingest little starch relative to humans. [8]
    This is an adaptation humans have for eating starchy foods in order to break it up into sugars.

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