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Thread: An anecdote to think about page 2

  1. #11
    sakura_girl's Avatar
    sakura_girl is offline Senior Member
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    Wasn't PB a lifestyle to begin with? It's not all about eating, although I'm sure it plays at least a 20-30% role in our overall health.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie View Post
    My third son was born with biliary artresia (no bile ducts in the liver) and quickly went into liver failure and spent the last year wasting away, dying. You can imagine the stress. It was unbearable. During this time I went full paleo and ate very healthy despite everything going on. My weight would not budge. Not even a pound. Boy was I frustrated. 6 months ago he had a liver transplant. The transformation has been amazing. He's healthy and happy. And my weight is literally melting off...I'm a fat burning machine now, still primal/paleo with good amounts of carbs, raw milk, bone broths, lots of fats, etc, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry H View Post
    Allow me, also a parent, to say how glad I am for you and your family and thanks for sharing that.
    Hear, hear!
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  3. #13
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    Oh yea, stress is huge. I gained ten pounds the week after my grandfather died. And it wasn't water. Never did that before or since. I don't think I really ate more either...

    That said, I think there is more to your situation. You gave your body a break from destructive foods, you gave it time to heal and rebuild. So it's not surprising that you can eat crap now and be fine. But don't expect it to last forever. You are now tearing away at what you built up and won't see it until you tear enough away to affect function. It's like if you worked and saved for years and built up a good chunk of money in your bank account... and then started writing checks off of it as you so desired, never checking the balance. You wonder why you worked so hard and were so responsible before- heck there was no need, just writing checks all day works just as well and is much more fun. But eventually the checks start bouncing and your back at square one. But this time older and possibly worse off than ever. A little spending is fine, but make it a habit and you'll be sorry.
    Last edited by AshleyL; 01-26-2013 at 09:06 PM.

  4. #14
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    Excellent analogy, Ashley.

  5. #15
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    fiercehunter is offline Banned
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    I thought about this earlier on my trip to Target. I thought about my recent weight gain (I have achieved a "normal" weight after being underweight the last few years) and how the years I was below BMI were parent-free. I've had to get away from both parents (and really everyone) from my past in order to work a lot of things out. I didn't gain it all back, but the body composition isn't like it used to be. There's some fat gain, but nothing serious. I'm normal, which I realize I might have been all along. I needed to lose at most 5 lbs- maybe 10. But even at 90 lbs a lot of people could not admit I was skinny...... I was told my perfect weight (which is 97) was "too big". I'm at least 3-5 pounds heavier than that now, but feel better. What is also hard to understand is how I got away with weighing 108 in highschool (that would practically be huge today, thanks to the emphasis on being 10-15 lbs below the height/weight chart). Neither parent seemed to care what I did back then (actually no one cared- I never heard a word one way or the other, except that I had great legs), and certainly no one commented about my 4-6 day a week cardio routine. Really the fact is, nothing I ever did was good enough for them: no amount of exercise would have ever made them happy. I quit in my mid 20s, which was led to the dieting phase, something I have only just recently ended.... I wonder how it is that some people have these "issues" that seem tied to other people, but even if you seem to get the upper hand, you never really do. In my case, I passively starved it all off in my late 20s while living at my deceased grandmother's house. I ate oatmeal for breakfast and a sandwich at night, and gradually got down below 100. It was a great time for me, because I was so free. I loved being by myself and never thought about losing weight. I ate things I don't eat now, like nachos. I went through a phase where I baked tofu with tomatoes. Ok I admit it, I didn't drink milk. But the point is, being by myself seemed to help me a lot, and I've used that throughout the years to keep myself going. In the last few years I've been writing on boards like this and honestly, I don't really like to share the process with others. It isn't conducive. No one is ever really supportive, and people always act like they know it all. No matter what you say or do, it's a drama fest. And seriously, it gets so boring.

  6. #16
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    katemary is offline Senior Member
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    Noticed your absence GC, glad to see you around again.

    Sorry about your loss, and it is crappy to have a damaging relationship with your immediate family. I hope what you say isn't true for all - I haven't been in touch with my family for a decade now. I convince myself it has no affect for me (no contact= no stress from toxic relationships) but...yeah, I probably affects a lot of my behaviours, whether conscious of it or not.I hope your time off doesn't backfire, and you find some peace.

    I am a big believer in vicious circles sabotaging things. The stress of feeling fat and unattractive must add constant stress. I don't have to do much soul searching to concede my weight affects a lot of my decisions - who to catch up with, avoiding outdoor things I love, avoiding black tie events feeling to gross to "dress up", avoiding summer catch ups with friends. There must be stress about avoiding the things I know I will enjoy but feeling too unattractive to do them, even knowing I would love it. Sinister stress must sabotage a lot of our efforts to lose weight, vicious circle when you get depressed for not losing weight despite being"good"

    Though weight gain is only one sign of health. Even if your weight has not increased in the last year, you know enough to know there may be other damage. Anyway, interesting anecdote. Hope you go back to primal and feel well generally

  7. #17
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    Another thing, I've noticed this pattern a lot. People are sick with insulin resistance and the whole myriad of symptoms that comes with it. They're fat. They go primal, they start to improve, they get all stoked and they go low carb, maybe even super low carb and ketogenic. They feel awesome! They do this for a while. After a while they get sick of it (perhaps their body telling them they don't require low carb anymore?) and start eating some carbs again. Then they realize they feel fine! Maybe it was all in their head before? Because it's been so long and being healthy is the new normal, hard to imagine being sick when you are well, just as it's hard to imagine being well when you are sick.

    But I think this proves the idea that low carb screws up your metabolism and makes you insulin resistant (other than temporarily by choice-not by disease- but by choice to make the best use of the energy in the body at the time) is all WRONG. Rather, low carb diets give a broken system a break and a chance to heal. That is evidenced by how people are able to go back to eating the things that they could not before. Now there are cases where people eat one bit of high carb food and boom, their sugar shoots up and they feel like crap. Yea, but I think that's temporary from the shock of the change. If you go back to a more normal carb percentage in your diet more slowly, rather than punching your body in the gut all of the sudden, I think you avoid that. Or even if you do just go back to full carbs suddenly, after a few days you'd adjust, just as you adjusted to low carb to start with.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyL View Post
    Oh yea, stress is huge. I gained ten pounds the week after my grandfather died. And it wasn't water. Never did that before or since. I don't think I really ate more either...

    That said, I think there is more to your situation. You gave your body a break from destructive foods, you gave it time to heal and rebuild. So it's not surprising that you can eat crap now and be fine. But don't expect it to last forever. You are now tearing away at what you built up and won't see it until you tear enough away to affect function. It's like if you worked and saved for years and built up a good chunk of money in your bank account... and then started writing checks off of it as you so desired, never checking the balance. You wonder why you worked so hard and were so responsible before- heck there was no need, just writing checks all day works just as well and is much more fun. But eventually the checks start bouncing and your back at square one. But this time older and possibly worse off than ever. A little spending is fine, but make it a habit and you'll be sorry.

    This definitely makes sense. Very nice Ashley. My wife lost 20lbs eating primal. She went back to drinking some soda and being closer to 70/30 than anything, but her body responded rather ok to it. IMO she stabilized her hormones and healed her metabolism so that it now functions much better even in a suboptimal situation. Kinda like when we were kids chowing down sugar cereals!

    That said there is always a tipping point.

  9. #19
    Zach's Avatar
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    I can agree with what is being said here. There should always be a healthy balance between everything. Trying to eat too clean will lead to stress of the mind. Eating too poorly will lead to stress of the body.

    I think Matt Stone had a good anecdote about a person he was helping. The guy was going to his doctor for health issues related to food and the doctor kept eliminating food groups and the guy kept getting worse and worse. Eventually the guy stopped going to the doctor. One day he came back for a checkup and looked amazing, the doctor asked what diet he was on and he said "the pizza and beer diet!" He just stopped giving a sht and lived his life which took care of a bunch of stress related to being healthy. I think we can all relate to that at least a little.

    In some context a food considered universally bad like pizza can actually improve health from a variety of ways, that doesnt mean that the entire diet needs to be junk food.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crabbcakes View Post
    Whether you eventually decide to ditch Primal or whatnot [...] But, please, don't go thinking that you are invincible to the real junk food for long - no matter what WOE you ascribe to or not, there just isn't enough nutrition in that stuff to sustain you!
    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyL View Post
    You gave your body a break from destructive foods, you gave it time to heal and rebuild. So it's not surprising that you can eat crap now and be fine. But don't expect it to last forever.
    Please don't misunderstand. I am not eating pizza every day. I am still cooking my own meals at least 5 days of the week in the way that I always have.

    You talk about tearing down what I've built up but let's be reasonable here: there are plenty of people much older than me who have eaten much "worse" than I do in terms of adhering to PB who are in fine shape.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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