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Thread: Is there any info on helping Gout with Primal eating? page

  1. #1
    slee11211's Avatar
    slee11211 is offline Junior Member
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    Is there any info on helping Gout with Primal eating?

    Primal Fuel
    Hi all,

    Starting to research for my brother in law. Perfectly healthy guy, and comes up with full-on gout at 30! Now, due to the daily medication and less movement, he is going from a healthy weight to very overweight (and he's from a naturally thin family, so this is bad). I am trying to see if this way of eating has had any effect on gout and figured this would be the place to look. If anyone has run across any info, can you point me towards it?

    Thanks so much -

  2. #2
    StephenHLi's Avatar
    StephenHLi is offline Senior Member
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    People usually with high uric acid levels in blood serum have tendency for gout attacks.

    Normally (conventional) recommendations are to reduce alcohol consumption and reduce meat ingestion (red meat especially).

    The most likely, more appropriate cause of gout is poor kidney function. Over fatigued kidneys or damaged kidneys cannot efficiently filter out the urea.

    It is not a bad idea to decrease alcohol or meat consumption during an active gout attack, but this will not effectively aid the kidney function.

    For your brother in-law, his increased weight is most likely water weight and edema.

    Some very effective treatments for gout are:

    1.) Tart cherries or the juice - anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidants, vitamin C

    2.) Celery seed tea or capsules - 1 to 2 cups of tea per day, do not use long term due to strong kidney detoxing effects.

    3.) Apple cider vinegar - applying a diluted application to active gout site can reduce inflammation, swelling and pain

    Eating goji berries and kidney beans will help strengthen the kidneys as well. Have your brother in law get good sleep and proper rest, for this will no doubt help his overall energy level.

    Reducing all sugar and corn syrup intake should be default practice, eating more anti-inflammatory foods along with anti-oxidant rich foods will no doubt help as well.

  3. #3
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Here are a couple of research papers for your perusal:

    Rhazes' Prescriptions in Treatment of Gout

    http://www.academicjournals.org/ajpp...%20et%20al.pdf

    http://www.ijbpr.com/admin/fckeditor...le/86_6-11.pdf

    I had gout attacks monthly for years. All went away with giving up alcohol, sugar, vegetable oils, and refined grains (flour). I eat all the other foods that supposedly cause gout, though! Bacon, venison, seafood, all veggies, everything...

    Is your brother on any meds? How is his health otherwise, esp liver?

  4. #4
    jturk's Avatar
    jturk is offline Senior Member
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    Gout is well established as a disease of civilization.

    In recent years, the evidence has continued to mount against excess fructose as the primary dietary trigger. Gout incidence has risen considerably in recent decades, alongside the increase in sugar consumption (largely from sweetened beverages), while red meat consumption has declined. It aint the meat.

    Lots of folks who've switched to either low-carb or ancestral diet have eliminated gouty attacks, thanks to elimination of added sugars.

  5. #5
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    PrimalCon New York
    Like a lot of disease, there can be more than 1 cause:

    (1) "Uric acid is a product of the metabolic breakdown of purine nucleotides" (Uric acid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). This confuses people because they don't know what purines are or where they come from. Purines are _nucleic acids_, the stuff DNA is made of. Purines are _not_ carbs, fats or proteins, though they can be synthesized from protein. Consumption of things that are high in nucleic acids can elevate uric acid. Beer, brewed with yeast (bacteria, which are mostly DNA), comes to mind.

    (2)Low temperatures (winter) can lower the temperature of uric acid in the body in places notorious for poor peripheral circulation (toes) to the point where it solidifies (gout is crystallized uric acid).

    (3) Chronic excess consumption of fructose. The 'new' finding mentioned above is that excess fructose consumption triggers the body to metabolize purine, which leads to excess elevated uric acid once again. In short, too much fructose can trigger an 'excess' of internal purine metabolsim just as if too much was consumed.
    Last edited by PaleoLogicCheck; 01-24-2013 at 05:46 PM. Reason: typo
    (1) I am 100% on-board with the primal exercise blue print. It reduces the problem of exercise down to its simplest form and provides a solution that can be used for a lifetime.

    (2) I'm not on-board with the primal diet blue print. In fact, I'm not on-board with any diet plan but a man can hope to find the right answer before it's too late.

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