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Thread: Does walking directly improve fitness? page 2

  1. #11
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
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    Yeah a walk is not going to do much for your fitness if you're already relatively fit. I presently only walk as part of my work commute but when I have a lot of shit on my mind/heart I like to go for a longer walk. I've been toying with the idea of going to a different train stop that's further away so that I walk more in the mornings. I'm not expecting it to do shit for my fitness, but it's a nice way to start the day and get some outside time. I'm pretty fit/active so if I was looking to do something "for my fitness" while outside I would sprint and/or do calisthenics, etc.

    So, if there's something else you think is going to be more beneficial then just do that. If you're fit enough to, then by all means. I'm looking at the morning walks as "me" time, not fitness improvement time. However, I'm not saying walking is detrimental to fitness (on the contrary) but it's not going to improve your lifts or your mile time, either.
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

  2. #12
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    Not much difference between 55% and 75% except increasing fat usage over glucose usage as your intensity gets towards the lower end.

    Humans evolved walking. Sure there are some fitness measures that come from it, but most of the improvements gained from a daily walk are not measurable as they have to do with proprioceptive feedback loops, neurology, and general health of the entire system.

    But like Einstein said "Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." So don't miss the forest for the trees when your talking about movement (particularly walking) and fitness.

  3. #13
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    I guess there's one last thing I need to know. So far, my schedule has been so busy during the weekdays that I have to make walking a scheduled part of my routine (35 minutes a day exactly). This was done mainly to spread out the boredom of walking on a treadmill. It's a real shame considering that the command that I'm based at has over 20 miles of trail on a former rice plantation. The problem is that the trails are all very easy, with no real elevation change. Since the general consensus here seems to be that keeping my intensity higher is doing nothing for me, I am now willing to utilize the trails so I enjoy the walking more (perhaps strapping on a weight vest in the process). However, the amount of time it takes for me even get out to those trails would be too much. Again, I stress how much time I don't have during the week. But I do have plenty of time on the weekend. Let's say my goal was to achieve the 3-5 hour recommendation of low-level cardio per week. At my current 35 minutes a day, I am achieving it. Would it be exactly the same if I were to walk only 2 days (the weekend) for a longer duration so that it adds up to the same weekly time?

    I know I'm over-thinking this. I'm used to people reminding me of that with every thread I start. But when you're in the military, you have to make efficient use of what little free time you have. And efficiency is impossible without a plan.

  4. #14
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    You are clearly over thinking this! You say you have little time? Walking is the least efficient way to fitness. You'd be FAR better off doing one brief, intense full body workout and one sprint interval workout a week. This would take you less than an hour a week. Then you could do whatever the rest of the time. What I just suggested would go much further than walking for hours a day every day.

  5. #15
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    But I already do all that. I strength train 5 times week and sprint one, sometimes twice a week. I have recently taken to long periods of stretching and foam rolling to increase hip mobility. All this and I still think I need to walk. Why? Because I spend upwards of 14 hours a day in a classroom. I am not exaggerating my lack of time.

  6. #16
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    Second and third on the overthinking. I walk 15 to 20 miles a week (not including incidental walking). I don't worry about heart-rate, etc... That's what the sprint is for.

    This is one instance where the WWGD scenario works. Groks walked a lot to get from point A to point B, sprinted and lifted occassionally. IMO, jogging or even fast-walking are unnatural.

  7. #17
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    Walking, like other exercise, can help you achieve a number of important health benefits. Walking is a form of exercise accessible to just about everybody. It's safe, simple and doesn't require practice.

  8. #18
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    I walk anything between 3 miles and 10 miles a day.Cloer to 10 weather permitted.I use a Fitbit to track how many steps and miles I've done.I live beside the sea so love being out in the fresh air.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Not much difference between 55% and 75% except increasing fat usage over glucose usage as your intensity gets towards the lower end.

    Humans evolved walking. Sure there are some fitness measures that come from it, but most of the improvements gained from a daily walk are not measurable as they have to do with proprioceptive feedback loops, neurology, and general health of the entire system.

    But like Einstein said "Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." So don't miss the forest for the trees when your talking about movement (particularly walking) and fitness.
    I like this explanation.

    I don't have anything to add about the 55% vs 75% heart rate, but it's clear that walking is good for you no matter how you do it. I think doing things that we enjoy (like walking outdoors instead of on a treadmill) are important to our health in ways that can't be measured.

    One of the things I always have in my mind is how our feet function as a 'second heart'.

    Circulatory System & The Second Heart | The Vein Treatment Center

    'There are two systems of veins at work in the legs: the deep system and the superficial system. The deep system veins are of a large diameter and are situated close to the bone, surrounded by muscle. The superficial system veins are located in the fat tissue under the skin, and are visible at times. These two systems meet at two junctions, one at the groin and the other behind the knee. They also meet through a series of connecting veins called perforators.

    Blood moves within the venous system because of the heartís residual pumping force, the negative pressure in the veins created while breathing, as well as the contraction of the muscles in the calf and foot Ė a muscle-vein system often referred to as the second heart.'

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