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Thread: Resistant Starch - A Solution In Search of a Problem page 17

  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wafaa View Post
    I think the problem is that most of these studies are conducted on average SAD eating people whose diet and colon, I believe it's safe to say, are not particularly healthy. So it's possible that encouraging resistant starch consumption and SCFA production may benefit the colon or benefit the insulin response. However, I do not necessarily see the jump in logic where we say that for a healthy primal eating individual who doesn't have insulin resistance, who's got plenty of good fat intake, who is adapted to fat-burning instead of sugar burning, who is avoiding nasty vegetable oils, who has a healthy gut with regular movements, that eating additional resistant starch will further reduce the risk of colon cancer, improve colon health, or improve insulin sensitivity.

    For me the end sum is eat primal, eat some carbs, eat proteins and eat fat. If it's causing your gut or body distress keep it off the menu. If potatoes and white rice work for you as a food source, great, but they aren't some miracle food that will save your colon if your body isn't healthy. And if your body is healthy, then your colon cells are getting what the rest of your body is and they don't saving anyway.
    Exactly. It's like claiming that wheat bread is "good for you" when compared to Wonder Bread.

    Quote Originally Posted by RSQueen View Post
    There have been two major international clinical studies to see if RS prevents colon cancer. One was in people with familial polyopsis and the other was in people genetically predisposed to colon cancer (Lynch syndrome). Neither one showed reduced risk of colon cancer with RS. There's still a lot of debate about whether the doses in these studies were too low, but the fact is - they fed hundreds of people RS from raw potatoes, retrograded high amylose cornstarch or granular high amylose cornstarh and it didn't stop the progression of the cancer. More cancer prevention trials are still underway so researchers are still trying to figure it out.
    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I am so glad you chimed in on here. Excellent papers, too. You know people think you are really me, right? Whoever you are, thanks!
    If she is your sockpuppet, Otzi, you should tell her what to say better than the above.

    OK, so far we have the great RS program:

    raw potatoes
    green bananas
    stale maize porridge
    fermentable fibre suppositories

    Um, no thanks. I just had ribs for dinner and some camembert for dessert.

  2. #162
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    I roasted a huge sweet potato, the inside was on the slightly harder side, and didn't fully sweeten up, basically i had it mildly raw, tasted good and i can see some resistant starch being present. No complaints from me either way.

  3. #163
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    All I'm saying is that when you want to eat carbs, make them the promote-your health kind and the kind that actively turn on the genes that do good things in your body. I couldn't agree with you more than highly digestible, high glycemic carbs aren't good. I think Otzi's is really smart - he has read a lot and he's making a lot of sense. Rather than reject information because it's done in SAD eating people, consider it as a validation that you're right - eating a lot less sugar and flour benefits you. Just don't throw the resistant starch baby out with the bathwater. And thanks for the complement - here I was thinking that you guys were going to rip me apart!

  4. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    OK, so far we have the great RS program:

    raw potatoes
    green bananas
    stale maize porridge
    fermentable fibre suppositories

    Um, no thanks. I just had ribs for dinner and some camembert for dessert.
    That may be how YOU would choose to implement it, but for me, I do it like this:

    - If I eat a banana, I try to find one that's still got some green in it.
    - When I'm cooking potatoes, I eat a slice of raw potato while cutting them up.
    - I eat potatoes and rice almost every day, leftovers are eaten cold.
    - I eat sushi regularly for the RS and raw fish.

    I can not answer PKlopp's question: How much exactly is required for optimum health. But I think the answer is about 5-20g/day from different sources of RS containing foods.

  5. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    That may be how YOU would choose to implement it, but for me, I do it like this:

    - If I eat a banana, I try to find one that's still got some green in it.
    - When I'm cooking potatoes, I eat a slice of raw potato while cutting them up.
    - I eat potatoes and rice almost every day, leftovers are eaten cold.
    - I eat sushi regularly for the RS and raw fish.

    I can not answer PKlopp's question: How much exactly is required for optimum health. But I think the answer is about 5-20g/day from different sources of RS containing foods.
    IMO, green bananas are not really worth eating. PK and your queen agree on how little RS there is in cooked spuds and I'm with cori that raw spuds do not qualify as food.
    So, I'll join you for the sushi but you can have the rest of it.

    As far as the numbers of grams go........I can make up numbers too. I think you need 0 to 100 grams/day. See? It's easy.

  6. #166
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    I just watched this:

    John Welbourn, B.A. - Food for Performance on Vimeo

    In it, the presenter mentions white rice a lot as a good carb sorce for "seriously competative lifters." Towards the end, there's a guy who talks about the content of resistant starch contents of the various rices as a warning to anyone who might have gut bacterial overgrowth. He says that white rices such as basmati and long grain are slightly ok sources of the compound but conversely, points out that sushi rice has almost NO RS in it. The content of RS in rice varies by type of the rice therefore, and cannot be summed up with one single value.

    Also, sushi would therefore be a poor to horrible source for RS, but more optimal for a post-workout carb up because the body will absorb more of it instead of being fermented in the gut.

  7. #167
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    Shhhh, Drumroll. Be quiet. I was trying to get an invitation out for sushi with Otzi just cuz I like sushi. Don't tell him there's no RS in it.

  8. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Shhhh, Drumroll. Be quiet. I was trying to get an invitation out for sushi with Otzi just cuz I like sushi. Don't tell him there's no RS in it.
    You can come with me then. I go for sushi every once in a blue moon. That's probably the most likely way to get me to eat my rice anyway.

  9. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    I just watched this:

    John Welbourn, B.A. - Food for Performance on Vimeo

    In it, the presenter mentions white rice a lot as a good carb sorce for "seriously competative lifters." Towards the end, there's a guy who talks about the content of resistant starch contents of the various rices as a warning to anyone who might have gut bacterial overgrowth. He says that white rices such as basmati and long grain are slightly ok sources of the compound but conversely, points out that sushi rice has almost NO RS in it. The content of RS in rice varies by type of the rice therefore, and cannot be summed up with one single value.

    Also, sushi would therefore be a poor to horrible source for RS, but more optimal for a post-workout carb up because the body will absorb more of it instead of being fermented in the gut.
    That's interesting. Yes, i agree that if you were purposefully looking for RS, sushi rice would be a poor choice, but if you were eating rice to 'carb-up' then I think it would be better to eat it cold than hot.

  10. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Shhhh, Drumroll. Be quiet. I was trying to get an invitation out for sushi with Otzi just cuz I like sushi. Don't tell him there's no RS in it.
    I'd take you out for sushi any day! RS or no...

    You did point me in one direction on this RS buzz that I like. The people recommending high levels of RS intake all seem to be associated with the Hi-Maize corporation. I was a bit baffled at first why Australia seemed to be so far ahead of the curve in RS recommendations on intake, also.

    In a 'follow the money' bit of sleuthwork, I see that Hi-Maize is made by a company called Ingredion, a conglomerate of Corn Products and National Starch. They have a big network of Australian bakeries using Hi-Maize to increase RS. What else is Ingredion famous for? High Fructose Corn Syrup...

    So, while I still am a firm believer that RS is a real thing, and healthful to the gut, I am now also seeing that it is probably being hyped by it's makers who are interested in selling corn products.

    I think a diet totally devoid of RS can't be the best diet, but that amounts of 20g/day, as recommended by the makers of Hi-Maize, probably is not needed and who knows, may be harmful.

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