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Thread: Resistant Starch - A Solution In Search of a Problem page 14

  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    And all of this begs the question... If resistant starch is so good for you, where are my resistant starch supplements at the health food store?
    I was looking for RS supplements to show you and accidently stumbled across this: http://foodaust.com.au/wp-content/up...lement_web.pdf

    There don't seem to be any supplements available that are purely RS, but a company called Hi-Maize makes a purified RS for the food industry, so I wouldn't be surprised if it ends up in health food stores as a supplement. I'm not too sure I like the thought of highly purified corn starch, though.

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I'm not too sure I like the thought of highly purified corn starch, though.
    Well, we can agree on this much at least.

  3. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by pklopp View Post
    You still have not provided any evidence to support your stand on RS.

    -PK
    I guess I got nuthin' for ya, then.
    Last edited by otzi; 01-25-2013 at 02:57 PM.

  4. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSQueen View Post
    ...I have been using resistant starch for 10 years and am hoping to provide some insights to this string,...
    The best food sources of resistant starch are slightly green bananas (containing appx 4.7 g of resistant starch/medium banana), beans (3.7 g of resistant starch in 1/2 cup cooked white beans) and lentils (3.4 grams of resistant starch in a 1/2 cup of cooked lentils). Yes, raw potatoes are all resistant starch. When you cook it, the starch gelatinizes and the starch granules burst open and it all becomes rapidly digestible - it will spike your blood sugar levels strongly. When a cooked potato is cooled, the glucose chains crystallize a bit and forms about 12% resistant starch. All in all, cooked and cool potatoes deliver low levels of RS - in the range of 1 gram/cup.
    I wanted to ask you a few questions about your experiences with RS.

    About how much per day are you trying to get and from where?

    Have you noticed any benefits?

    Do you think the amount of RS in about 1/2 to 1 pound of potato, with some eaten hot, some cold, and some raw is enough to make a difference?

    Thanks.

  5. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I wanted to ask you a few questions about your experiences with RS.

    About how much per day are you trying to get and from where?

    Have you noticed any benefits?

    Do you think the amount of RS in about 1/2 to 1 pound of potato, with some eaten hot, some cold, and some raw is enough to make a difference?

    Thanks.
    Otzi, if I surmise right, she was talking effectiveness was seen at dosages of 15 or more grams of resistant starch daily.

    She also says one cup of potatoes is about 1 gram of resistant starch.

    What is .5 pounds of potatoes? Maybe three cups? Ok, and for a pound, double it. This is just a guesstimate of course, but that's about 3-6 grams daily of RS, far away from the doses she says were seen to be effective.

    Interpret that as you want though. She also says that potatoes might not be the best source because of how quickly and how much they effect the blood sugar, if I interpret that right.

    Furthermore, she points out that beans are a better source of RS than you seemed to be implying before. Far better than your beloved potatoes at least.

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    Otzi, if I surmise right, she was talking effectiveness was seen at dosages of 15 or more grams of resistant starch daily.

    She also says one cup of potatoes is about 1 gram of resistant starch.

    What is .5 pounds of potatoes? Maybe three cups? Ok, and for a pound, double it. This is just a guesstimate of course, but that's about 3-6 grams daily of RS, far away from the doses she says were seen to be effective.

    Interpret that as you want though. She also says that potatoes might not be the best source because of how quickly and how much they effect the blood sugar, if I interpret that right.

    Furthermore, she points out that beans are a better source of RS than you seemed to be implying before. Far better than your beloved potatoes at least.
    I hope RSQueen checks back and enlightens us.

    I started lovin' spuds before I heard about RS, so no matter, they are firmly entrenched in my diet! I'm still thinking my plan of some hot, some cold, some raw and a few green bananas would be a really good plan. Like I've said, most LC PB diets are completely void of all sources of RS. Maybe in this case some is better than none.

  7. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I wanted to ask you a few questions about your experiences with RS.

    About how much per day are you trying to get and from where?

    Have you noticed any benefits?

    Do you think the amount of RS in about 1/2 to 1 pound of potato, with some eaten hot, some cold, and some raw is enough to make a difference?

    Thanks.
    I eat RS because it keeps me regular, and helps me not be hungry throughout the day. I use the Hi-maize resistant starch because it's the easiest way to get RS. I mix about a tablespoon into a smoothie for breakfast (along with a banana, fruit and yogurt). I absolutely notice benefits - when I don't get RS, I get constipated and much hungrier.

    I do think the amount of RS in 1/2 to 1 pound of potatoes is enough to make a difference. I haven't ever eaten raw potatoes but it wouldn't take much raw potato to make a difference.

    I am less intrigued by the microbiome composition than I am by what they do. The LSU team has shown that the fermentation of resistant starch in the gut increases production of GLP-1 and PYY in animals and that the levels of these hormones stay elevated in the bloodstream for 20+ hours. These are the hormones targeted by the diabetes drugs like Januvia, which are the latest generation of wonder drugs - they facilitate weight loss and blood sugar control. The half life of GLP-1 is roughly 5 minutes. But, RS is a big insoluble starch granule that ferments over hours and hours through the intestinal tract - which produces anti-hunger hormones for hours and hours. Those same hormones improve insulin sensitivity. These shifts in metabolism are all good. Regardless of the mechanisms, I feel less hungry and consider regularity as a side-benefit.

  8. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    Otzi, if I surmise right, she was talking effectiveness was seen at dosages of 15 or more grams of resistant starch daily.

    She also says one cup of potatoes is about 1 gram of resistant starch.

    What is .5 pounds of potatoes? Maybe three cups? Ok, and for a pound, double it. This is just a guesstimate of course, but that's about 3-6 grams daily of RS, far away from the doses she says were seen to be effective.

    Interpret that as you want though. She also says that potatoes might not be the best source because of how quickly and how much they effect the blood sugar, if I interpret that right.

    Furthermore, she points out that beans are a better source of RS than you seemed to be implying before. Far better than your beloved potatoes at least.
    Raw potatoes would be a better source than beans, but cooked potatoes contain far less RS than beans.

  9. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I was looking for RS supplements to show you and accidently stumbled across this: http://foodaust.com.au/wp-content/up...lement_web.pdf

    There don't seem to be any supplements available that are purely RS, but a company called Hi-Maize makes a purified RS for the food industry, so I wouldn't be surprised if it ends up in health food stores as a supplement. I'm not too sure I like the thought of highly purified corn starch, though.
    Hi-maize isn't in health food stores, but you can get it at King Arthur Flour, a specialty bakery supply company in Vermont. They sell it two ways - as a basic ingredient, and premixed into flour to make a high fiber flour. And it's not chemically modified (as was stated very early in this thread). It is starch from high amylose corn that has been heat moisture treated to help the long amylose chains of glucose line up and crystallize (helps it to resist digestion). Out of the 500+ studies published in the scientific literature, the majority used this ingredient or ingredients like this.

    I cited 15 grams of resistant starch showed improved insulin sensitivity in overweight men. Yes they used a lot (3 tablespoons of the isolated ingredient), but they showed a 56% improvement in insulin sensitivity. That's huge. Men who ate 6 tablespoons had a 73% improved insulin sensitivity. Is it likely that insulin resistant people who eat 5 or 10 grams of resistant starch a day see some improvement - you betcha. And since 35% of American adults have prediabetes (are insulin resistant, according to the US Centers for Disease Control), eating more RS on purpose is a no brainer.

  10. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSQueen View Post
    I cited 15 grams of resistant starch showed improved insulin sensitivity in overweight men. Yes they used a lot (3 tablespoons of the isolated ingredient), but they showed a 56% improvement in insulin sensitivity. That's huge. Men who ate 6 tablespoons had a 73% improved insulin sensitivity. Is it likely that insulin resistant people who eat 5 or 10 grams of resistant starch a day see some improvement - you betcha. And since 35% of American adults have prediabetes (are insulin resistant, according to the US Centers for Disease Control), eating more RS on purpose is a no brainer.
    Well for one...I couldn't find the citation. I found the statement that you "have seen", but not the citation. I coulda missed it though if you wanna repost that. The experiment could be interesting to read.

    And yeah, there are indications for a reduced carb load improving insulin sensitivity, exercise for certain, more sleep for certain, better lipid profiie, acute or chronic illness, and so on.

    Honestly I see our symbiotic relationship with these little buggers as yet another adaptation to a missing ingredient in the diet. In groups that eat a lot of starch with little access to animal (like Kitavins maybe) this process would enable them to get the SCFA they need. But, in a group that relies little on starch with sufficient animal product we have little to no use for them. IMO its yet another example of how resilient and versatile we can be in adapting to a variety of environmental factors. This has been shown over and over by the diversity of diets that studied humans can thrive on.

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