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    Epigenetics and raw vs cooked grass-fed beef, fowl, seafood ?

    Primal Fuel
    I had a read of this... What I Mean by “Reprogram Your Genes” ..and a read of this..."Latest in Gene Expression Research". However he hasn't said anything on which types of meat/fish turn on and turn off genes in the epigenome, and whether raw or cooked meat/fish has any positive or negative effects on the epigenome. Can someone elaborate?

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    Epigenetics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (and in French: Épigénétique - Wikipédia )

    Landes Bioscience Journals: Epigenetics

    Environmental epigenetics: prospects for studying epigenetic mediation of exposure

    All you ever wanted to know about epigenetics in the links above. I was really excited when I first learned about epigenetics a few years ago, but it is not the magic bullet it seems. It is REAL, but past eating a good, clean diet, avoiding toxins, sleeping good, getting exposure to sunlight, and exercising it is mostly out of our control. The biggest problem being there is no way to test how we are doing or see how changes we make effect our epigenetics.

    You will see the term DNA methylation throughout any discussion of epigenetics, DNA methylation is a biochemical process that is important for normal development in living organisms. It involves the addition of a methyl group to the 5 position of the cytosine pyrimidine ring or the number 6 nitrogen of the adenine purine ring (cytosine and adenine are two of the four bases of DNA). This modification can be inherited through cell division. DNA methylation is essential for normal development and is associated with a number of key processes including genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, suppression of repetitive elements, and carcinogenesis.

    It would be wonderful to be able to say, "Eat tuna 3 times a week to prevent DNA methylation transcription errors that cause cancer", but nobody can say that.

    What can be said is, "Eating a diet high in toxins, with unbalanced omega 3:6 ratio, can cause DNA methylation problems which could result in diseases."

    I think the term 'epi-genetics' is being used as a buzz word and no one can really explain how our diet can effect it in ways we can predict other than the basics.

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    Interesting articles. Science seems new.

    I would like to know the difference between eating cooked vs raw meat/fish on DNA methylation or human health.

    It would be wonderful to be able to say, "Eat tuna 3 times a week to prevent DNA methylation transcription errors that cause cancer", but nobody can say that.
    Maybe the tuna but I don't see why not with a type of food rich in folic acid. Effect of folic acid supplementation on genomic DNA methylation

    What can be said is, "Eating a diet high in toxins, with unbalanced omega 3:6 ratio, can cause DNA methylation problems which could result in diseases."
    A diet high in toxins, yes, but also a diet lacking vitamins and minerals is just as harmful. Can you provide scientific information that unbalanced omega 3:6 ratio causes DNA methylation problems?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalamin View Post
    Interesting articles. Science seems new.

    I would like to know the difference between eating cooked vs raw meat/fish on DNA methylation or human health.



    Maybe the tuna but I don't see why not with a type of food rich in folic acid. Effect of folic acid supplementation on genomic DNA methylation



    A diet high in toxins, yes, but also a diet lacking vitamins and minerals is just as harmful. Can you provide scientific information that unbalanced omega 3:6 ratio causes DNA methylation problems?
    I was really just pulling those foods out of the air, there is no scientific data you will find to tell what you are looking for. If anyone tells you they have it figured out, they are probably lying. I think science has proven that epi-genetics changes can and do occur, but to tell you the cause and way to reverse them have not been determined.

    All you will find are generalizations, like this:

    Nutrients that are necessary for altering metabolic pathways include folic acid, B vitamins, choline and methionine. Consuming a diet high in fish, nuts, seeds, whole grains, eggs, dairy, lean meats and vegetables can help decrease disease risk. According to Oregon State University's Rod Dashwood, a professor of environmental and molecular toxicology and head of LPI's Cancer Chemoprotection Program, "The traditional view of cancer is that genetic damage and DNA mutations occur, in ways that can turn off key genes and our natural defense mechanisms against cancer." For example, the epigenetic role for garlic is to increase histone acetylation, which is responsible for turning on anticancer genes.
    Fiber

    Read more: Epigenetic Diet | LIVESTRONG.COM

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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    I was really just pulling those foods out of the air, there is no scientific data you will find to tell what you are looking for. If anyone tells you they have it figured out, they are probably lying. I think science has proven that epi-genetics changes can and do occur, but to tell you the cause and way to reverse them have not been determined.
    Those who know, don't speak.
    Those who don't know, speak.

    Did you even read the study I posted above?

    Conclusions: These results suggest that DNA hypomethylation can be reversed by physiological intakes of folic acid.
    Effect of folic acid supplementation on genomic DNA methylation in patients with colorectal adenoma

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