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Thread: How Long Does It Take You to Workout? page 6

  1. #51
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Huh? All I was talking about was strength. Dunno where you got any other idea from. Ripptoe and the like don't own the trademark on strength.
    That's the sense I got from the Body by Science website. That it was about training for a good looking body. Not a lot of talk about lifting lots of weight, more about spending more time under the bar. I didn't quite see what kind of training it is, but it looks like it's that super slow weight lifting (doing stuff like leg press, not squats) plus maybe a lot of fast conditioning things? I'm not sure I want to do the super slow stuff.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    That's the sense I got from the Body by Science website. That it was about training for a good looking body. Not a lot of talk about lifting lots of weight, more about spending more time under the bar. I didn't quite see what kind of training it is, but it looks like it's that super slow weight lifting (doing stuff like leg press, not squats) plus maybe a lot of fast conditioning things? I'm not sure I want to do the super slow stuff.
    That is pretty closed minded of you. You really don't know what it is about but you know you don't want to do it. Read the book, it makes a lot of since if you open your mind to the possibility that there is more than one way to accomplish the same goal.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecole66 View Post
    That is pretty closed minded of you. You really don't know what it is about but you know you don't want to do it. Read the book, it makes a lot of since if you open your mind to the possibility that there is more than one way to accomplish the same goal.
    You know what makes a lot of sense? To follow in the footsteps of those who have already achieved success before you. Of course, that raises the question: Do most succesful bodybuilders, power lifters and strongmen follow an ultra slow lifting protocol? Or what about the NFL players, 100 meter sprinters and olympic weightlifters?

    The answer is a resounding no.

  4. #54
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    ^ I dunno are most successful bodybuilders, power lifters and strong men 47 year old females that have done little to no strength training in their lives? How about NFL players, 100 meter sprinters and olympic weightlifters?

    Meh, I'm obviously messing with you but there is a point there. I'm a middle aged guy with a strong base in strength and athletics. I've done just about all of it. I'm not gonna say that SS (guess this could mean superslow or starting strength huh? and it does ) is "IT", but when you're talking to sbhikes and you know her history it makes sense.

    Personally I like a bit quicker than SS....more like 5/5 type rep speed, but I see a lot of benefit from slowing down your turnarounds. Sometimes I do the 10/10.

    I'm sure your familiar with HIT. Less volume and more intensity has its merits. SS is just under the umbrella of HIT. I think its a valid approach for people like myself that have beat the shit out of their joints in an earlier life, people like SB who are having difficulty with recovery, and a variety of other persons. Tailor the method to the person ya know.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 01-14-2013 at 09:04 PM.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kharnath View Post
    You know what makes a lot of sense? To follow in the footsteps of those who have already achieved success before you. Of course, that raises the question: Do most succesful bodybuilders, power lifters and strongmen follow an ultra slow lifting protocol? Or what about the NFL players, 100 meter sprinters and olympic weightlifters?

    The answer is a resounding no.
    Actually quit a few collegiate and NFL teams have strength and conditioning coaches who follow the HIT philosophy. The slow part of BBS is to save the wear and tear on joints and tendons. If you read my post again you may notice I said there is more than one way to accomplish the same goal. The genetic freaks you mention will have great success on any training program. I want the best results I can get while doing the least amount of damage to my body in the process. I have no desire to be in constant pain in my later years like many of the athletes you mention above.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecole66 View Post
    Actually quit a few collegiate and NFL teams have strength and conditioning coaches who follow the HIT philosophy. The slow part of BBS is to save the wear and tear on joints and tendons. If you read my post again you may notice I said there is more than one way to accomplish the same goal. The genetic freaks you mention will have great success on any training program. I want the best results I can get while doing the least amount of damage to my body in the process. I have no desire to be in constant pain in my later years like many of the athletes you mention above.
    There is a huge difference between HIT and slow training. I tried the super slow training for three months, recorded everything, and it just didn't work for me. Doesn't mean it doesn't work, but... When I started training more conventionally, my gains were rapid and quite apparent.

    As for damage from weights, there are a couple of theories about that. Power lifters, who train for absolute strength, and tend to get their benches above 300, their squats about 500, etc, do put a lot of stress on the body which tends to, I agree, build up stress and damage over time. Bodybuilders, who train hypertrophy at lighter weights (but still heavier than what the super slow allows) tend to do less damage to their bodies.

    For regular people who want to get strong, there is no reason not to lift heavy (relatively speaking). I don't think people who are benching 220, squatting 400, etc, are at particularly high risk of injury unless their form is crap.

    The only advice on injury I can offer is focus on the back and shoulders. When training shoulders, make sure you also exercise (with significantly lighter weights) the rotator cuff and all those little bitty muscles. That will really help reduce the incidence of shoulder injury. With a strong back (the whole back, not just the lats from pullups), you can reduce your risk of "other" injury and improve your posture too

    --Me

  7. #57
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    Starting strength is a beginners program and HIT was originally designed by Arthur Jones as a program for very advanced lifters. Personally I train 5 - 6 days of lifting per week, high sets and high reps and I do a lot of stretching between sets and weighted streching as well. I usually finish my lifting in 1,5 hour. Every morning I also do 1 hour of mixed cardio. When I started out I started on a 3 days a week full body program and I have advanced from there. Yes it's a pretty high volume, but it does my body and mind well, so high volume rules I say...

  8. #58
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    Closed minded? I went to the website to get an idea of what BBS was about. I read all the articles. I got a lot out of one of them, found it really interesting. It wasn't entirely clear from the articles what BBS is, but from what I could gather it was super slow weight lifting plus HIT. I am not interested in trying super slow weight lifting right now. I have no joint problems, by the way. I'm built like a mack truck when it comes to bones and joints. I'm doing regular weight lifting on a two-day-a-week schedule now since 3x a week was a little too much for me. I am sprinting once a week or so, just regular ordinary track sprints. I do a hike in the mountains at least once a week. Try to walk out in the sunshine daily. I don't see what is so wrong about what I'm doing. It just simply takes me about 45 minutes to do the weight lifting that I do: Squats, Bench, Lat Pulls, DB Rows and Back Extensions on one day and Squats, Press and Deadlift on the other. I try to rest about 5 minutes between work sets.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecole66 View Post
    That is pretty closed minded of you. You really don't know what it is about but you know you don't want to do it. Read the book, it makes a lot of since if you open your mind to the possibility that there is more than one way to accomplish the same goal.
    I think you need to ease up on the coffee, pal. Someone who sticks with more traditional exercises because they work, and gets results, isn't closed minded for not wanting to try to fix something that isn't broken. Especially if the fix is dubious at best.

    --Me

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamm View Post
    I think you need to ease up on the coffee, pal. Someone who sticks with more traditional exercises because they work, and gets results, isn't closed minded for not wanting to try to fix something that isn't broken. Especially if the fix is dubious at best.

    --Me
    Pal? All I am saying is read the freakin book and do some research before you call a training method "dubious". Keep your mind closed and keep doing what you are doing if you like but don't bash others for trying something different and scientifically proven who are getting great results.

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