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Thread: Ridiculous microbiology textbook blurb page

  1. #1
    Britt's Avatar
    Britt is offline Senior Member
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    Thumbs down Ridiculous microbiology textbook blurb

    Primal Fuel
    Please make my day suck less after reading this in a "sidenote" in my microbiology textbook:

    "The higher the fat
    content of food, the
    slower the movement
    of feces through
    the bowels, where
    bacteria convert
    the undigested fats
    into cancer-causing
    compounds."


    I rolled my eyes so hardcore, but I'd like it if anyone could come up with some convoluted reason why any textbook author would ever think this to be accurate.
    "The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love and something to hope for." - Allan K. Chalmers (1759-1834)

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    I believe undigested fat in stool is not something any relatively healthy person would experience. Like a lot of studies they seem to put all fat into one category. When they study people with health issues they have probably been eating the wrong kind. I am no expert though maybe someone else has more information.

  3. #3
    interzone's Avatar
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    I have a Ph.D. In microbiology, and the only research I've read on bacterial breakdown of intestinal contents involved different types of carbohydrates. Does your text have a citation for this um, "interesting", tidbit?

    This article concludes that a high-fat test meal will make it from your mouth to your toilet faster if you've been on a high-fat diet. If you've been on a low-fat diet, the high-fat test meal will take longer to get to the toilet.
    Gastrointestinal adaptation to diets of differing fat composition in human volunteers.

    The other research I pulled up in a (very) cursory search involved CF patients and animal models like chickens, mice, and rabbits. Animals can be excellent models for bacterial and viral pathogenesis, but none of them evolved eating the same sort of diet humans do. That said, I wouldn't put any faith in those studies, and I don't find the studies of fat digestion in CF patients terribly useful for a non-CF population, either.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by interzone View Post
    This article concludes that a high-fat test meal will make it from your mouth to your toilet faster if you've been on a high-fat diet. If you've been on a low-fat diet, the high-fat test meal will take longer to get to the toilet.
    Gastrointestinal adaptation to diets of differing fat composition in human volunteers.
    The high fat diet in this study would be considered a low fat here. IMO no compairison to a paleo experience.

  5. #5
    Timthetaco's Avatar
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    Is the blurb maybe referring to putrefaction? Is there any context to it? I'm talking out of my ass here; I don't know anything about microbiology. Found this: Intestinal Dysbiosis and the Causes of Disease

    Putrefaction dysbiosis results from diets high in fat and animal flesh and low in insoluble fiber. This type of diet produces an increased concentration of Bacteroides sp. and a decreased concentra- tion of Bifidobacteria sp. in stool. It increases bile flow and induces bacterial urease activity(1). The alterations in bacterial population dynamics which result from this diet are not measured directly by the [Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis (CDSA)]. The changes occur primarily among anaerobes, but the effects are measured in an in- crease in stool pH (partly caused by elevated ammonia production) and in bile or urobilinogen and possibly by a decrease in short chain fatty acids, especially in butyrate. Epidemiologic and experimental data implicate this type of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of colon can- cer and breast cancer(6).

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