Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: Why are Organic and Grass Fed more expensve? page 3

  1. #21
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    6,414
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by ecole66 View Post
    While that sounds good if everything was organic, wild or grass fed there would not be enough food to feed the world population. It is not only about profits as many would like to think.
    Of course it's only about profits. The system rewards companies who exacerbate the world's overpopulation problem by turning all the world's biomass into human mass in the most effective way possible. So every time we exceed the carrying capacity of the planet, we just put more land to the plow and destroy entire ecosystems in the name of monoculture. You don't think profits drive this? You think Monsanto and Archer Daniels Midland and Cargill are benevolent and would still send the food to the "starving Africans" if it came out of their own pocket?

    Here's just a few dozen links/examples as to how backward your thinking is.

  2. #22
    not on the rug's Avatar
    not on the rug is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    nj
    Posts
    3,257
    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Of course it's only about profits. The system rewards companies who exacerbate the world's overpopulation problem by turning all the world's biomass into human mass in the most effective way possible. So every time we exceed the carrying capacity of the planet, we just put more land to the plow and destroy entire ecosystems in the name of monoculture. You don't think profits drive this? You think Monsanto and Archer Daniels Midland and Cargill are benevolent and would still send the food to the "starving Africans" if it came out of their own pocket?

    Here's just a few dozen links/examples as to how backward your thinking is.
    it always comes back to quinn
    I have a lot of hard miles on my body from before I realized I'm not 100% invulnerable. Now I just think I'm 75% invulnerable. -Mr. Anthony

    Give me a spouse/life-partner who I don't want to punch in the throat when she talks. -Canio6

  3. #23
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    6,414
    Quote Originally Posted by not on the rug View Post
    it always comes back to quinn
    At least I'm consistent

  4. #24
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Laissez le bon temps rouler!
    Posts
    6,559
    Thank you all for your answers.

    Rich, maybe not in my lifetime, but I think organic sustainable production of food is the only answer for long term. And while small farmers may not be making a lot of money, I recently read (I didn't bookmark it) that some of the larger organic farms, like ones that have been doing it since the 70s are more profitable than some factory food entities. Surely just the clear cutting of old growth (rain) forests to raise cattle and soy is just one factor that shows that CAFO is short-sighted.

    Machines doing the work of humans was something I didn't factor in. And the shoe analogy was perfect. Maybe by the time I'm a rickety old cavewoman of 100, our efforts and those of other folks (don't count out those veggie folks) will bring prices more in line.

    Sydney. Oops. It's not that I don't like children, I'm just a bit noise averse. I never had any (always figured I was too nuts to be a good mother), so my nervous system isn't adapted to squeals, tantrums, etc. I actually think children are quite fun and ask the best questions.

    Again, thank you everyone!
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

  5. #25
    Urban Forager's Avatar
    Urban Forager is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Of course it's only about profits. The system rewards companies who exacerbate the world's overpopulation problem by turning all the world's biomass into human mass in the most effective way possible. So every time we exceed the carrying capacity of the planet, we just put more land to the plow and destroy entire ecosystems in the name of monoculture. You don't think profits drive this? You think Monsanto and Archer Daniels Midland and Cargill are benevolent and would still send the food to the "starving Africans" if it came out of their own pocket?
    I tend to agree with you.

    BTW when I buy half a beef it comes to about $4.80 a pound for pastured beef, not certified organic. I know the farmer and the meat is raised w/in biking distance of my house so I am familiar with the way it's raised.

  6. #26
    cruncan's Avatar
    cruncan is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    livingston, al
    Posts
    98
    Government Conspiracy!
    Hustle for Happiness, Hustle for Love, Hustle for Health, Hustle for Wealth, Hustle for Muscle

    http://www.hustleformuscle.com

  7. #27
    Sandra in BC's Avatar
    Sandra in BC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,100
    Its only noticeably more expensive when you compare equivalent cuts side by side at a grocery retailer. A retailer will always charge what they can get away with. You can save $$ by not buying grocery store meat.

    I don't buy my grass fed beef by the cut at a retailer. I buy it by the 1/2 or 1/4 from a local grower, butchered by a local butcher. I end up paying about $5.50/lb (cut, wrapped & flash frozen) for everything from ground beef to prime rib. Our game meat is naturally organic and grass fed, and costs about half as much, and we get most of it made into hamburger and sausage.

    I see the biggest price difference in chicken. I can buy grocery store whole chickens on sale for $2/lb but the free run, family raised, no hormone, antibiotic free, omnivorous, kitchen scrap and bug eating whole chickens -- when available -- cost about $3.25/lb.
    Sandra
    *My obligatory intro

    There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

    DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

  8. #28
    AMonkey's Avatar
    AMonkey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    737
    Feeding animals on grass on land you rent/own produces less yield than feeding cows grain. You need quite a lot of land to feed animals, where as with grain feeding, you need extremely little. Organic requires higher standards of welfare since you can't use antibiotics on the animals. Thats the long and short of it.

  9. #29
    SarahW's Avatar
    SarahW is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by AMonkey View Post
    You need quite a lot of land to feed animals, where as with grain feeding, you need extremely little.
    But, doesn't the grain grow on land?

    Yeah, I know, but js - overall land use is still largely equivalent, yes?

    If the USDA encouraged more cattle ranchers, and less corn farmers, grass-fed beef would drop in price while the same amount of land remained agricultural.

  10. #30
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    8,720
    PrimalCon New York
    The reason standard ag is so cheap is because the environmental costs are externalized. They are either paid for right now by others (other than those who actually profit) or else the costs are pushed forward into the future. For example, a person raising hogs in an indoor hog operation (same for indoor chickens) does not own the hogs. He is only a contractor. He will eventually be responsible for the cleanup of the lagoons. He is forced to take out loans to upgrade the equipment. He's paid a very low wage. I saw in some movie that a lady running an indoor chicken operation was paid $18,000 a year and had to take out million dollar loans for upgrades whenever the industry wanted new equipment that would increase production. This sort of externalizing the costs happens in a lot of industries, not just farming.

    You all should see Joe Salatin's talk from the AHS 2012. His farm is extremely fecund and productive and he has a LOT to say on the subject of farm productivity and how we're going to have to do things if we want to be truly alive, human and have a decent future. Really inspiring.
    AHS 12 Presentations on Vimeo
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 190 x 3

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •