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Thread: Why do so many folks not Vaccinate their kids? page 7

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHaselow View Post
    You are my age. Do you know why your parents chose not to vaccinate? At that time, we didn't get any as newborns and I think only 5-6 shots by the time we entered kindergarten. They were pioneers! It seems that the addition of the HepB at birth and others within the first 6 months correlates with the increase in Autism and other neurological disorders (around 1991). When we were little, I didn't think there was any concern. Just interested.
    I was the youngest of 4. As I recall. My mother knew one lady who took her daughter into have the shots and she had an adverse reaction to it. (she ended up being mentally handicap) That was the deciding factor for my mother. She didn't want to take the chance. I don't blame her. There are things out there that they don't tell you. I have travelled to Mexico, Caribbean, etc. I don't have any recent shots like Hep, etc. My kids are healthy as well. I also don't vaccinate my animals for similar reasons or just enough to get away with fixing them etc. A g/f's cat ended up with Lukemia after having a shot to prevent it (indoor cat) (wasn't necessary) Died at less than 2 yrs of age. Poor thing.

  2. #62
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    Because people are very ignorant and assuming everyone's out to get you is far easier than doing a learning.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHaselow View Post
    If leaky gut is to blame for Autism symptoms, then something is causing leaky gut that was not widely present 20 years ago.
    .
    The genetics of the wheat plant has changed. It has been bred with other grasses to make it shorter (so it doesn't blow over in the fields before harvest ) and to make it mature more quickly. (More harvests a year.) And yes, you are right, there are more cases now of leaky gut and cealiacs than there was 50 years ago. Of course, most of the grain now grown is also the short grain - not heirloom ones. If you would like more information, read the book Wheat Belly.

    We may have a really bad convergence of things going on - and yes, I will not dispute that autism may be the new ADHD that is blamed for everything.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by PHaselow View Post
    Ah, but why the mind boggling rise in cases? And please don't say better detection and diagnosis. If that were the case, then we would see equally mind boggling reductions in cases of other disorders (we see just the opposite). Something is harming our children.
    If you are specifically focusing on autism, I think there is autism, and then there is "that which mimics autism."

    Both are on the rise, and I have two theories about it.

    First, "that which mimics autism" is on the rise due to injury/food/leaky gut/etc. Lots of causes.

    Second, autism spectrum is on the rise because more people on the spectrum are mainstreamed. Read an interesting article about it in Wired some years ago. Essentially, people on the spectrum have long existed, but those with aspergers and less severe forms of autism often were isolated singles who didn't find 'rock star' status in any aspect of their lives.

    Enter the computer age, a place where those on the spectrum really shine, and they truly do become rock stars. They are desirable. And, they often find their own kind -- others on the spectrum. They marry, they have children. In the past, this was more rare (or believed to be).

    This was the theory based on how autism often "clusters" around the major computing centers in the US. Rochester, San Fran and "Silicone valley" etc. They have a higher incidence of adults on the spectrum working good jobs and being well rewarded at work and in their social environments, and they often marry each other and have children. Their children are more likely to be autistic.

    There was also a fly-away theory in there as well that perhaps smart people are at greater risk of having autistic children, that it might somehow be related to having two highly intelligent people reproducing.

    Again, this is *all* conjecture.

    I have seen autism "cured" -- usually through brain healing and gut healing work. If autism is genetic, healing wouldn't work. Therapies would work to help them work with their brains -- like it does with dyslexia. I've seen this happen as well.

    This is why I suspect that it's two different things -- one that mimics the other.

  5. #65
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    Autism is really a description for a group of symptoms that may have different causes in different people. I come from a multi-generational autistic family (almost all of the boys/men, and at least one girl). Certainly in the case of the older generations, vaccines would have nothing to do with it because they did not grow up with a childhood vaccination schedule.

    I don't buy the autism-vaccine connection. The reality is that the symptoms of autism frequently emerge at a similar age to when children get the bulk of their vaccines (regardless of immunization status), and the correlation is mistaken by some for causation. I think there is an enviromental factor in some autism cases, but I don't think vaccines are the cause.

    Vaccine-related complications can occur, but they are rare and the mortality is significantly lower than that of children with, for example, measles. I had measles in infancy before I was vaccinated, and it led to hospitalization. My brother nearly died of meningitis of a type for which we now have a vaccine. I have done my research, and I will vaccinate my child(ren).

    Parents of course have the right not to vaccinate if they feel the risks outweigh the harms. However, as someone who has a shaky immune system (seven bouts of chicken pox in childhood, other recurrences of illness for which I should have developed immunity), I would like you to keep your unvaccinated children away from me if there is any, and I mean any, possible risk that they are infectious. I have a friend who teaches elementary school who has parents who send their children to school despite the fact that they have chickenpox on the grounds that other children need to develop immunity--those children could pose a risk to someone like me since adult varicella infection is no laughing matter.

    Same thing goes if you choose not to get a flu shot and then become ill. Stay home. Don't go to work.

    If you won't vaccinate, then at least please do your best to ensure that you and your child are not plague vectors.
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  6. #66
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    I know for me, and I am sure others who take the time to research not vaccinating, are responsible parents who never ever take their children out while sick.
    Slight runny nose, I don't even take them out.

  7. #67
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    Really, because I know people right now who are having to take preventative meds for whooping cough because anti-vax friends brought their sick kid over to their house. I'm glad you're responsible, but lots of people aren't. The attitude that diseases such as measles, rubella, and so on are "harmless childhood diseases" leads a lot of people to act very stupidly and not follow quarantine procedures (which was how people tried to contain disease outbreaks pre-vaccine era).
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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  8. #68
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    I agree on the "that which mimics autism" idea.

    Diet can have a SIGNIFICANT effect on how the brain functions. Not enough omega-3, too much omega-6, constant, sky-high insulin levels, nutrient difficiencies... These can ALL have an impact on how the brain functions. So too can the amount of physical activity that people are getting. And these days, with people eating diets that are the nutritional equivalent of slow suicide while sitting on their asses all day is NOT conducive to a healthy and normal functioning brain. I could easily see the brains of people living lives like this being at a greater risk for replicating certain "autism-like" symptoms. This starts when the bad diets are introduced, so even from a very young age as we are seeing. This could partly explain why "autism" diagnoses would see a rise. And if their brain is now replicating several basic symptoms of the syndrome, then they may as well be assumed to have it. Call it "dietairily and lifestyle-influenced autism."

    But there most DEFINATELY is a genetic link to autism. There are families that have histories of autism in them that go back many generations, to before the advent of the moder western diet (and vaccines since we're discussing that). In addition, there are statistics that CONTINUALLY prove that males are more likely to be diagnosed as on the autistic spectrum. It's not as if there are no females have autism, but if autism were ALL related to dietary, lifestyle, and other related factors, you would expect to see roughly equal amounts of males and females on the spectrum. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Males seem to be more likely to posses the gene that predisposes them to the risk of developing autism.

  9. #69
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    On that, my son has a couple of symptoms of autism (don't we all). The hand movements, the big circles when talking (he'll walk in a big circle when recalling and a figure 8 when creating), and the constant talking. I am quite in tune with how they react to food as we've been low chemical since he was 5 (he's 11). We removed wheat from my children's diet end of November and I've noticed that even though he still does the chatterbox and circling, the hand movements have disappeared.

    My youngest had a major wheat allergy and by the end of her first week, had a burnt bottom (weeping, red rash etc). It took 14 weeks to clear (6 for me to work out the problem food, 8 for the proteins to clear my milk, her system and for healing to happen). She was very sensitive and reacted to the smallest amount, plus had bad reactions to dairy and soy (even ghee). After what her system had gone through, I couldn't have her vaccinated. chose not to have the newborn vax for her. My others have had all the common vax (not things such as hep B, chicken pox, flu but yes to the MMR, polio, diptheria etc) but later than the schedule.

    I'm considering having the youngest vaxxed for the bad ones, but separately.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    Really, because I know people right now who are having to take preventative meds for whooping cough because anti-vax friends brought their sick kid over to their house. I'm glad you're responsible, but lots of people aren't. The attitude that diseases such as measles, rubella, and so on are "harmless childhood diseases" leads a lot of people to act very stupidly and not follow quarantine procedures (which was how people tried to contain disease outbreaks pre-vaccine era).
    DS got hand/foot/mouth virus this way, poor baby.

    Otherwise, we keep him in as well. Unless we are trying to px him (chicken pox parties, but he never got it. well, not yet at least). Our primary practice when he was a baby was having me stay home and nurse him as much as he wanted, and now that he's weaned, we do cuddles and bone broth and juice.

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