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Thread: Frustrated... Lets eat seasonally then. page 2

  1. #11
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Fuel
    The easiest way to eat seasonally is to buy the least expensive foods or work with a good farmers market.

    Here in NZ, the price of food is high, but eating seasonally keeps it in check.

    In the winter, we eat: squash (pumpkin, various other squash), leeks, cabbage, brussels sprouts (they grow here well in winter), cavolo nero (form of kale that is my favorite), kale, silverbeet/chard, onions, sweet potatoes. Citrus fruit is also in season.

    I make a lot of warm salads and soups in winter.

  2. #12
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    also listen to your body...I find I'm not really craving salads and cool foods in these cold months---but a roasted chicken...that's a different story!
    Check out my blog on nature and nurture!
    http://thewoodsygal.com/

  3. #13
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    Challenge for winter produce for me (living in NY city) is that the citrus and apple produce has been piss poor for the last two years!!! REALLY bad! But I'm trying different varieties of citrus to find one that's acceptable and I'm enjoying organic pears. Eating apples, just less of them since they aren't so succulent this year. LOVE potatoes. LOVE home made carrot ginger soup, utilizing carrots, ginger, onion, garlic, carrots and organic chicken stock. YUM! Shopping at the farmer's market takes the guess work out of local and seasonal. BEST place to go!

  4. #14
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    Just to add a wrinkle..I am type II diabetic. I have been perusing Dr. Bernstein's book and it seems most winter produce is a big no-no and summer produce tends to be fruit which I obviously eat sparingly but he says just don't. I live in Florida so seasonal is a bit different here. I am a little confused on the whole process to be honest. And my ARNP who is a functional med practitioner and supports a primal lifestyle is always telling me to eat more greens to keep up my (sucky) immune system.
    You know all those things you have always wanted to do? You should go do them.

    Nah.. I was always aware "they" were out to get me.. even before I became Primal..... Now I can just run faster if they find me-Dino Hunter

    Age 46
    height 5'3
    SW 215 lbs
    CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
    LW 172 lbs
    GW 125ish lbs

  5. #15
    zoebird's Avatar
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    Seasonal veggies are the real score, actually.

    In summer, we eat cucumbers, bell peppers, all kinds of herbs and lettuces, and late-season asparagus (which is delicious), and we can get broccoli/cauliflower/cabbage/silverbeet-chard/kales all year round. We do stone fruit and berries in summer.

    onions are good year-round as well. there are so many differnt kinds of things you can do with onions, and there are different kinds of onions as well.

    Being in florida, you'll have a much longer 'summer' growing season, and in fact, you may never have very distinct seasons. If you hit up a farmers market, the local providers can tell you what is in season year-round and what is truly seasonal.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarasue624 View Post
    My farm folk grandparents stockpiled sweet potatoes and onions for winter. They lasted perfectly on the cool floor of a cellar all winter. There's probably a reason meat and potato stew is considered winter food.
    I'd like to know at what temp we're talking cause mine go south within a week or two in the house at about 65 degreed F.

  7. #17
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    I don't know if it specifically aids weight loss, but I would think eating seasonally wouldn't hurt and it actually might help. Although nothing grows in winter where I live, so I tend to stick with the idea that it is ok to eat if it is in season somewhere in the country. I know the actual primal people of this area would have stuck to only potatoes and the like during the winter with lots of meat, but I'd have a hard time handling that! I try for cabbage, brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, kale, and leeks in particular in these months.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I can't say that I consciously eat seasonally, but I'm noticing that I haven't really been in the mood for much fruit since the cold weather started. Also, when it comes to produce, especially with the price of organic produce, I shop deals, so I think I might be eating what's abundant at any given time of the year. Major exception is tomato, which I eat in various forms all year 'round.
    Now that you mention it, I haven't been in a fruit mood since it got colder. That's very interesting! My protein cravings have sky-rocketed, though.

  9. #19
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    A good root cellar or even a modern cellar can have temperatures down between 40-50 degrees F. The temperatures very from floor to ceiling, and also vary cellar to cellar based on depth.

    Many modern houses are built on platforms, so the actual "ceiling" of the "basement/cellar" is higher than ground level. Other homes are build on the ground level, or even slightly below (with footings below ground level and sealed for moisture), with cellars having vents or other entry points outside of the house (which allows for ventilation).

    The deeper below ground the cellar goes, the cooler it can be. Many traditional root cellars are built into hillsides, as they tend to have more insulation from the earth above, keeping them more consistently cooler.

    One of the most impressive root cellars that I have seen was at an amish farm in PA. The main root cellar was large -- built into a hill -- and it had a second room that had a running spring. they kept the spring running, but bricked the little room.

    The spring room was easily 35-40 degrees F, and then the main root cellar -- which was massive -- was closer to 45-50 depending upon where you were in the room. The spring room was not only used for clean water, but it was also used as cold storage for dairy products like butter, milk, cream, etc, as well as meats that were processed but were to be cooked/eaten later that week, or further processed in other ways.

    Truly, it was a sight to behold!

  10. #20
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    I'm gonna go against the stream and say that I don't think seasonal eating is really gonna help you cut the weight. It might, it might not, but at the end of the line all the carb-heavy fruits come into season during the autumn. That's the time when all the mammals begin to put on some fat to last them through the winter. This is true for carnivores and omnivores alike.

    Season eating might help, yes, but if you gorge down apples and veggies just because they are in season, you probably won't lose much weight at all. It comes down to common sense. Of course it also depend on where you live, since far from everywhere on Earth actually see harsh winters with temperatures below freezing point like we do over here.

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