Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 102

Thread: Thinking like a caveman, is it even possible? page 9

  1. #81
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Primal Fuel
    Knifegill, I don't see why it needs to be a binary. And for some of us, VLC feels like hell. A diet of only animals would be misery for me.

    I don't declare that your ketogenic diet is inferior for you. Please don't claim that my choice to include fruit is inferior for me.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  2. #82
    Him's Avatar
    Him
    Him is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Tejas Norte
    Posts
    282
    I think one of the mistakes most of us probably make about living like a cave man is to assume our unconscious cultural norms apply.

    Years ago I read an article about the challenges and pitfalls of globalization. One of the anecdotes reported was that car manufacturers who opened factories in Mexico and tried to approach labor from a US/European perspective had tremendous difficulty keeping workers on the job. Not a problem finding people who could do the jobs, but getting them to come in to work every day. You know, like 99% of workers in the 1st world do. Workers in these car plants in Mexico would work a day or two then stop showing up until they needed more money.

    Why?

    In the US it can reasonably be assumed that you (or any worker) will keep working as long as someone is willing to pay you more. It isn't hard to find people willing to work 70+ hours a week. That's arguably changing (the whole "life balance"thing) but that's mostly for salary jobs than hourly. The fact that I could survive on $10k/yr, or pretty comfortably live on $50k/yr, hasn't caused me to throttle back and work fewer hours once I passed those milestones. A 20% raise wouldn't cause me to cut my hours by 20%.

    But that's cultural. It isn't how everyone behaves, as the people opening car plants in Mexico discovered. The solution to their problem was pay cuts, until the workers needed to work 40hrs/WK to survive. Without doing that, the workers just didn't see the point in showing up. The difference isn't genetic, isn't a matter of intelligence, it's cultural.

    So... We assume that if Grok had unlimited fruit, or meat, or whatever, Grok would fatten up. Another perfectly reasonable hypothesis is that Grok would spend less time on survival and more time having fun, which of course naturally tends to produce a lot of Groklings, and soon the abundance wouldn't be sufficient. It just depends on Grok's cultural framework.

  3. #83
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Well he did say 80/10/10 sucked. I don't think thats your diet. I'm all for live and let live, but I do have a suspicion that if you cut your fats to under 30% of your maintenance level diet your going to invite a lot of issues due to lack of fat soluble vitamins and structural precursors for hormones. Probably why you read about a prevalence of depressive and other psychological disorders a that extreme.

    Heck that goes for anyone not eating the right fats in any quantity for that matter.
    Yes, re-reading his post I see I misinterpreted what he was saying.

    I couldn't even be a vegetarian successfully (I did try). I can't imagine trying to do the 80/10/10 raw fruitarian thing. I love my fruit, but I also love a big-ass post-workout steak or a bowl of scrambled eggs with avocado and salsa. I am so much happier now that I don't try to do silly things like Meatless Mondays and limiting meat to one 4oz serving a day. Some of the banana people are lean, sure, but long term, their health really suffers, and there are lots of stories of people gaining weight on 80/10/10 too (CI/CO still matters even if one's diet is almost entirely sugar or entirely fat).

    By the way, did you know that if a woman comments at the end of her lifting that now it's time to go home and eat the hell out of some steak, every man in the gym will look at her male partner with awe and envy? True story.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  4. #84
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    Yes, re-reading his post I see I misinterpreted what he was saying.

    I couldn't even be a vegetarian successfully (I did try). I can't imagine trying to do the 80/10/10 raw fruitarian thing. I love my fruit, but I also love a big-ass post-workout steak or a bowl of scrambled eggs with avocado and salsa. I am so much happier now that I don't try to do silly things like Meatless Mondays and limiting meat to one 4oz serving a day. Some of the banana people are lean, sure, but long term, their health really suffers, and there are lots of stories of people gaining weight on 80/10/10 too (CI/CO still matters even if one's diet is almost entirely sugar or entirely fat).

    By the way, did you know that if a woman comments at the end of her lifting that now it's time to go home and eat the hell out of some steak, every man in the gym will look at her male partner with awe and envy? True story.
    haha thats awesome!

    I did vegetarian (actually closer to vegan) for about three months. Was absolutely not for me. But, hey I gave it a chance.

  5. #85
    Zach's Avatar
    Zach is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,869
    Quote Originally Posted by Him View Post
    I think one of the mistakes most of us probably make about living like a cave man is to assume our unconscious cultural norms apply.

    Years ago I read an article about the challenges and pitfalls of globalization. One of the anecdotes reported was that car manufacturers who opened factories in Mexico and tried to approach labor from a US/European perspective had tremendous difficulty keeping workers on the job. Not a problem finding people who could do the jobs, but getting them to come in to work every day. You know, like 99% of workers in the 1st world do. Workers in these car plants in Mexico would work a day or two then stop showing up until they needed more money.

    Why?

    In the US it can reasonably be assumed that you (or any worker) will keep working as long as someone is willing to pay you more. It isn't hard to find people willing to work 70+ hours a week. That's arguably changing (the whole "life balance"thing) but that's mostly for salary jobs than hourly. The fact that I could survive on $10k/yr, or pretty comfortably live on $50k/yr, hasn't caused me to throttle back and work fewer hours once I passed those milestones. A 20% raise wouldn't cause me to cut my hours by 20%.

    But that's cultural. It isn't how everyone behaves, as the people opening car plants in Mexico discovered. The solution to their problem was pay cuts, until the workers needed to work 40hrs/WK to survive. Without doing that, the workers just didn't see the point in showing up. The difference isn't genetic, isn't a matter of intelligence, it's cultural.

    So... We assume that if Grok had unlimited fruit, or meat, or whatever, Grok would fatten up. Another perfectly reasonable hypothesis is that Grok would spend less time on survival and more time having fun, which of course naturally tends to produce a lot of Groklings, and soon the abundance wouldn't be sufficient. It just depends on Grok's cultural framework.
    Awesome post! That all certainly lines up with a natural intuitiveness to limit stress that people seem to be losing.

  6. #86
    Owly's Avatar
    Owly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    haha thats awesome!

    I did vegetarian (actually closer to vegan) for about three months. Was absolutely not for me. But, hey I gave it a chance.
    I made it about a year in my teens, and then made a half-assed attempt at it in my late 20s (more flexitarian than full-on veg because it was after my celiac diagnosis and being a vegetarian celiac is a mess--makes eating in restaurants while paleo look like a walk in the park in comparison). I am definitely a natural omnivore and feel happiest when I have a mix of plant and animal foods, and I really, really love eggs...no idea why exactly, but runny yolks are one of life's joys.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

    Owly's Journal

  7. #87
    Zach's Avatar
    Zach is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,869
    As for the 80-10-10 comment, i was just using that as an example of sugar not being a direct cause of obesity. I dont think it is healthy at all. I do think that if Durian Rider added in some salt, a bit of dairy and a bit of red meat that he would see vast improvements in his health. The fruitarian diet really isnt all that horrible it just goes to extremes that if avoided could make it a very viable diet.

  8. #88
    bloodorchid's Avatar
    bloodorchid is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    tn
    Posts
    9,271
    Quote Originally Posted by KathyH View Post
    I dont understand this post. What do you mean fruit season is short? There are places that have fruits available all year long. Are you taking about where you live?
    for much of the world, there are growing seasons. just using my area as an example, and pretending that grocery stores with year round shipped in fruit don't exist, there are summer crops and there are fall/winter crops

    it takes weeks for something to become ripe enough to eat and back then there was no preservation. it was get it before the insects and other animals got it (or some sort of blight), and then eat it before it rotted on the ground or limb/vine and went to seed

    it's a very small window, and not realistic to state that all ancient man had to do was get up from his nap and pick something off the tree to eat any time he wanted, year round. even if he'd been roaming nearer the equator, it still wouldn't have been THAT easy to eat as much as he wanted, whenever he wanted
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

  9. #89
    Drumroll's Avatar
    Drumroll is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    3,900
    Quote Originally Posted by bloodorchid View Post
    for much of the world, there are growing seasons. just using my area as an example, and pretending that grocery stores with year round shipped in fruit don't exist, there are summer crops and there are fall/winter crops

    it takes weeks for something to become ripe enough to eat and back then there was no preservation. it was get it before the insects and other animals got it (or some sort of blight), and then eat it before it rotted on the ground or limb/vine and went to seed

    it's a very small window, and not realistic to state that all ancient man had to do was get up from his nap and pick something off the tree to eat any time he wanted, year round. even if he'd been roaming nearer the equator, it still wouldn't have been THAT easy to eat as much as he wanted, whenever he wanted
    If you consider the native Amizon tribes, they have rainy vs. dry seasons. When the Amazon river floods you can bet they're eating more seafood and less vegetable matter due to not being able to forage as well.

    When the river recedes again, they can get back to foraging for nuts, berries, and vegetables. So even in tropical climates there likely was some seasonable availability of certain foods.

    That said, I think even the tropical tribes are a poor example of "certain people had foods available all year." In my opinion, this is unlikely at best.

  10. #90
    bloodorchid's Avatar
    bloodorchid is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    tn
    Posts
    9,271
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    ^ high five
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 7891011 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •