Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Fish/Seafood in an area where it's not the most accessible page

  1. #1
    jkarlen's Avatar
    jkarlen is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    5

    Fish/Seafood in an area where it's not the most accessible

    Shop Now
    Hi Everyone,

    I'm originally from the suburbs of New York City but currently live in the suburbs of St. Louis. The difference in what is available from a food standpoint is frustrating. In the town I grew up in we had two dedicated fish markets but where I live now the only place to buy fish is the grocery store and those are normal chain stores with the nearest Whole Foods or Trader Joe's being in another country and maybe 40-50 minutes away.

    Based on what I've read in PB I don't know how confident I am in buying from the grocery stores.

    I could also use some recommendations on types of fish to eat. I tend to go for things like tuna, halibut or swordfish which I've learned in PB aren't the best choices. I'm not a big sardine or mackerel fan.

    I guess really these same questions exist for beef and poultry purchases. The grocery stores or even the local meat market are unlikely to be good sources of grass-fed proteins. I've seen a few of the online sources listed but it seems like you really need to order in big quantities and big dollars to utilize those services.

    Thanks for your feedback.

  2. #2
    Cryptocode's Avatar
    Cryptocode is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Norco, California
    Posts
    1,341
    I'm new here too, so I don't know much. But they've said to eat the bottom of the fish chain, not the top: as in - the larger fish eat the smaller fish. So Krill, anchovies, and sardines would be really good.

    I have the same meat problem you do. Organic meat is better than not, and not always more expensive. Grass-fed is best. We're considering buying a chest freezer and a 1/4 of a Grass-fed cow and some grass-fed chickens, pork, lamb,etc. Mark has a list of places to buy then. Otherwise you just have to do what you can.

    In our area we couldn't even buy liver. Choices have really narrowed in the last 5 years. Now they carry liver, but not kidneys, or any other organs. They rarely have lamb. The Grass-fed can be bought at almost the same price.

  3. #3
    fresa's Avatar
    fresa is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    90
    My recommendation for seafood, though others might have other ideas, is to looks at where it's from. For example, fish is usually labelled at the grocery store fish counter as being frozen/fresh, and wild caught/farmed. Go wild caught with actual fish, like salmon. If it is something smaller like scallops where it does not feed on other wild creatures and spend a lot of time swimming around, farmed is generally OK. If you are getting something canned, looks for something where the only ingredients are whatever fish (for example, tuna), water, and maybe salt.

    This may vary where you are as I am closer to the coast, but this is true of where I live even in chain grocery stores (around here it's Hannaford). Hopefully this is semi-helpful!

  4. #4
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    It's not the heat, it's the stupidity.
    Posts
    7,001
    The good news for people not living near the coasts is that many fish are flash frozen on the boats. This means that they spent very little time getting funky before they got to your grocery store. Once defrosted and put in the cases, though, you are relying on the grocery store to not sell you fish that is getting nasty. Ask to smell it before they wrap it up. Fish should smell like the sea - briney, salty, pleasant. If it smells fishy, let them keep it.

    "Good fats" from fish come from salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, and trout.

    Choose wild over farmed whenever possible. Antibiotics are used in fish farming due to the infections caused by the unnatural environment. Since canned sardines are about half the price of fresh, if you opt for that, I would pay the extra for BPA free cans. Others may disagree, but I figure that if I'm eating them for my health, might as well pay for healthy packaging, also.

    Shellfish isn't high in fat, but it's a terrific source of protein and some B vitamins.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •