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Thread: ideas for paleo baby food page 2

  1. #11
    Bron's Avatar
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    well, they don't have molars until they're two anyway gums are awfully hard things.

    mine never wanted food till at least 9 months (not counting my eldest cos you always make the most mistakes with them). so we did baby led solids in a way (i don't agree they need to play with the food, that's just a waste. give them a spoon to play with, not the food). also wouldn't give them bacon, too salty (bacon may be made differently in other countries of course )

  2. #12
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    It should go without saying, but I'm going to say it anyways, since it hasn't come up in this thread yet. You can never, never, NEVER leave a baby alone with these kinds of solids. Not to go to the bathroom, not to throw in a load of laundry... NOTHING! Choking, the real, deadly kind, not the gagging and learning kind, is silent and happens in a few seconds. Even a cooked carrot can break off a chunk and occlude a tiny airway.

    Baby led solids are a grand idea, but you HAVE to understand the risk and stay present for the process. A worthwhile investment of time, for sure.

  3. #13
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    Gums are fine for eating pieces of food, my youngest managed fine, as he got teeth after one.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by marthat View Post
    It should go without saying, but I'm going to say it anyways, since it hasn't come up in this thread yet. You can never, never, NEVER leave a baby alone with these kinds of solids. Not to go to the bathroom, not to throw in a load of laundry... NOTHING! Choking, the real, deadly kind, not the gagging and learning kind, is silent and happens in a few seconds. Even a cooked carrot can break off a chunk and occlude a tiny airway.

    Baby led solids are a grand idea, but you HAVE to understand the risk and stay present for the process. A worthwhile investment of time, for sure.
    Of course and I never did leave them alone with food. I did say that earlier

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marthat View Post
    It should go without saying, but I'm going to say it anyways, since it hasn't come up in this thread yet. You can never, never, NEVER leave a baby alone with these kinds of solids. Not to go to the bathroom, not to throw in a load of laundry... NOTHING! Choking, the real, deadly kind, not the gagging and learning kind, is silent and happens in a few seconds. Even a cooked carrot can break off a chunk and occlude a tiny airway.

    Baby led solids are a grand idea, but you HAVE to understand the risk and stay present for the process. A worthwhile investment of time, for sure.
    Yeah, this baby led solids thing is new to me but I would definitely never leave a baby alone with these kinds of foods...this comes from a woman who watched a relative choking on a piece of steak at a restaurant a while back. (Fortunately my husband successfully performed heimlich maneuver just as a restaurant manager came rushing out to ask if we needed an ambulance).

    Anyway, my first child expressed interest in solids at what I thought was a very young age - starting at around 4 months old. She'd watch us eat, following the food to our mouths, staring longingly. We brought her with us to a restaurant once and as she sat in her stroller she threw a temper tantrum as she watched me sip on bisque. I literally had to give her a little spoonful to quiet her down. And when she started cruising, I remember one instance when my husband had left a burger on the coffee table while he got up to get something and she quickly tried to cruise over to it, as her mouth hung open in anticipation! LOL!

    SO I'm trying to plan ahead. Thanks for all your ideas.

  6. #16
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    Baby led solids. Best idea ever. No trouble, no crap, no extra expense.

    And amazingly, although I wouldn't leave them alone with food anyway, I've never had a child choke in 14 years of feeding babies & toddlers. Gag, yes. But they always get it out by themselves. Amazing, they are! (And even the gagging is rare.)

    I had one child who wouldn't swallow a single bite of solid food till he was 12 months old. He'd put some in his mouth around 9 months and chew it, but not swallow. On his first birthday, we made popcorn in the skillet and he ate and swallowed a whole handful! Most of my children have been still using breastmilk as their primary food until they were 18-20 months old. (Mama has to have a solid diet for that to be enough, though.) Amazing boogers, they are.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MamaGrok View Post
    Baby led solids. Best idea ever. No trouble, no crap, no extra expense.

    And amazingly, although I wouldn't leave them alone with food anyway, I've never had a child choke in 14 years of feeding babies & toddlers. Gag, yes. But they always get it out by themselves. Amazing, they are! (And even the gagging is rare.)

    I had one child who wouldn't swallow a single bite of solid food till he was 12 months old. He'd put some in his mouth around 9 months and chew it, but not swallow. On his first birthday, we made popcorn in the skillet and he ate and swallowed a whole handful! Most of my children have been still using breastmilk as their primary food until they were 18-20 months old. (Mama has to have a solid diet for that to be enough, though.) Amazing boogers, they are.
    My oldest didn't really start *eating* solids until after 12mths of age as well. Breast milk truly is amazing. She was a chunky monkey.
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  8. #18
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    First let me preface this with the disclaimer that the only things I know about babies are that they smell really good and that holding them is better than reading a good book.

    I ran across this recipe while looking for ways to prepare beef heart and thought of this thread. Hope it helps.

    Poached Beef Heart Baby Food

    2 cups sodium-free beef or chicken stock
    1 pound beef heart, trimmed and cut into 1 inch cubes
    1 clove garlic, sliced
    Pinch of salt (optional)

    Over high heat, bring the stock to a boil in a medium saute pan. Add the beef heart and enough cool water to submerge the pieces. Briefly return the liquid to a boil then lower the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Add the optional garlic; cover the pan with a lid.

    Poach on the stove for 30 minutes or until the pieces are completely tender and easily pierced with a knife. Remove the beef heart from the stock, reserving both separately and cooling for 10 minutes.

    Add the cooked beef heart, 1/2 cup of stock and a pinch of salt to a large blender or food processor. Carefully blend into a smooth puree, adding more cooled stock as necessary to achieve the desired consistency. If you accidentally overshoot on the stock and the puree becomes watery, add boiled sweet potato, overcooked pasta, or powdered brown rice cereal to thicken it again. (Reserve any remaining stock for soups, stews, or to rehydrate legumes.) And if you desire an even smoother consistency, push the puree through a fine mesh sieve discarding any lumpy solids left behind.

    Decant the baby food into a clean bowl and cover the surface with plastic wrap. Once cooled to a "baby appropriate" temperature, serve in generous portions to your adventurous eater.

    Extra puree can be poured into ice cube trays, covered, and stored in the freezer for up to 3 months.

    Source: Beef Heart: An Unexpected Meal That Spans Generations : The Salt : NPR
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  9. #19
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    Steamed broccoli (soft enough to gum, strong enough to be picked up)
    Steamed or roasted carrots (tender but not too soft)
    Slow cooked meats (so they are tender)
    Steak slices (3-4 inches long, long enough they can pick it up and gnaw on the end. They'll get all the good stuff out and leave the tough fibers behind)
    ribs/chicken legs/other boned food with gristle, most meat, and small bones removed. Munchkin loved getting a chicken leg with that little bit of meat left at the top. She'd gnaw on that till every shred was gone. Same with ribs.
    Fresh fruit (pears, peaches, melon, sliced bananas, non-crunchy types)
    Cooked apples (and other crunchy fruits cooked tender)
    Eggs-scrambled and cheese omelets were (and still are) Munchkin's fav
    Meat sauce (spaghetti with ground beef) over zucchini noodles or spaghetti squash (be prepared for a HUGE mess)
    Cheese slices (if you do dairy)

    We did baby-led weaning starting at around 8 months when Munchkin started swiping stuff from our plates. She started with steamed broccoli and quickly moved to steak slices. I never cooked a special meal for her, she ate whatever we ate plus nursing. She loved sitting at the table with us and never had any issues (except for the time she tried to shove all her carrots in her mouth at once-that was interesting).
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  10. #20
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    i have an 8 month old, we breastfeed through the day, and do foods for dinner.
    we do a lot of sweeter veggies because breastmilk is quite sweet, so it is a little easier for baby to recognize as edible.
    also they get constipated easily, so i do meat, but only fatty meats high in iron, and only once a week or so.
    we do all home made purees, thinned with breastmilk or stock.

    avocado (perfect for "first food")
    roasted and mashy sweet potatoes
    steamed and pureed carrots
    steamed and pureed spinach
    steamed and pureed peaches
    steamed and pureed apples (only if she hasn't been constipated recently)
    mashy bananas
    cooked chuck, pureed
    roasted squash or pumpkin, pureed
    apricots stewed, pureed (i add this to lots of her foods to loosen the doo-doos)
    steamed and pureed broccoli

    the possibilities are endless.
    same with seasoning... powdered garlic, cinnamon, ginger, little chili powder..

    at times we just hand her whatever we are eating, but we salt heavily in our house so many times our foods aren't suitable for juniper.

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