Page 60 of 215 FirstFirst ... 1050585960616270110160 ... LastLast
Results 591 to 600 of 2148

Thread: Resistant Starches page 60

  1. #591
    zizou's Avatar
    zizou is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    307
    Imite start eating cold roasted potatoe with dollop of butter and sauerkraut.

  2. #592
    venfayon's Avatar
    venfayon is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    38
    I don't like the way rice burps up. Same for pasta and tomato sauces.

  3. #593
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    Quote Originally Posted by venfayon View Post
    I don't like the way rice burps up. Same for pasta and tomato sauces.
    If you find eating rice to be unpleasant, don't do it. Life is too short to eat foods you don't like.

  4. #594
    Annika's Avatar
    Annika is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    370
    I'm restarting potato starch after taking a break due to lots of indigestion. I think the indigestion was coincidental, because it didn't go away for a while - both my husband and I experienced it, and we are under a LOT of stress the past couple of weeks. I think it's more likely to be stress-related than anything to do with starch. So, giving it another go. I'm going to start slow, no more than 1 Tbs a day for several days.

    A question: I get that many traditional cultures ate lots of tubers. But did they really eat them raw? Eating raw potato starch seems kind of a non-paleo thing to do, like eating whey protein (which I also do). Can someone give me the rundown on how eating raw tubers follows an ancestral framework?
    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
    On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

  5. #595
    OneDeltaTenTango's Avatar
    OneDeltaTenTango is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    933
    Quote Originally Posted by Annika View Post
    A question: I get that many traditional cultures ate lots of tubers. But did they really eat them raw? Eating raw potato starch seems kind of a non-paleo thing to do, like eating whey protein (which I also do). Can someone give me the rundown on how eating raw tubers follows an ancestral framework?
    Tubers certainly fit in an ancestral framework. A certain amount would probably have been eaten raw or undercooked. A certain amount probably would have been eaten cooled as leftovers (with increase in RS due to cooling).

  6. #596
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Annika View Post
    Can someone give me the rundown on how eating raw tubers follows an ancestral framework?
    It's a great question and I won't claim to answer it but I remember photos in The World Until Yesterday of pre-industrial feasting ceremonies and the floor was knee deep in yam stems and peels. My hunch is that modern varieties are bred to be more user-friendly--the wild variety looked more like they boiled heaps and sucked a morsel of starch from each.
    35//6'3"/180

    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

  7. #597
    tatertot's Avatar
    tatertot is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    622
    Quote Originally Posted by Annika View Post

    A question: I get that many traditional cultures ate lots of tubers. But did they really eat them raw? Eating raw potato starch seems kind of a non-paleo thing to do, like eating whey protein (which I also do). Can someone give me the rundown on how eating raw tubers follows an ancestral framework?
    I was just reading up on this, perfect timing..

    IF you believe in evolution, this will make sense--if you don't, it can still maybe fit:

    Our distant ape-like ancestors evolved eating only raw plants. Humans spent the first million years or so eating raw plants, too. About 1 million years ago, we developed cooking, but for the first 750,000 years of cooking, it meant laying things inside or beside a fire to char it and burn through the skin, making insides softer. Things that were cooked this way for almost a million years in Africa were yams and meat mostly. Other things were still eaten raw--seeds, leaves, bugs, fruit, etc...

    Later, stone-boiling was invented, where heated rocks were placed in water troughs to heat the water. This allowed cooking of seeds and grains, too.

    Since cooking things required lots of work, lots of stuff was cooked at once, and then eaten cold for days--like we do with potatoes still. This cooking and cooling still allowed for lots of RS.

    It's estimated early man ate 100-200g of fiber per day, including lots of RS. Now, we eat maybe 15g of fiber w/2-4g RS.

    Adding in 20-40g of RS from potato starch is probably the most paleo thing anyone could ever do!
    Let those who have dyspepsia—and that means a multitude of ills which the American people in their luxurious habits are fast bringing upon themselves—try for a time the potato diet. We have tried it not for months, but a few days at a time—long enough to satisfy us of its good effects. Newspaper article from 1849


    Visit my blog: VEGETABLE PHARM

  8. #598
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    416
    Annika, Is this “Paleo”/ancestral/raw enough for you? https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...levant_count=1

    DuckDodgers at http://freetheanimal.com/2013/12/com...comment-547375 shared a report about a tuber related to the sweet potato that Maori people eat "either raw or soaked, and mashed up with a little warm water."

    The Inca peoples eat raw fermented potatoes called Tocosh (aka Togosh) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tocosh.

    And there's more evidence. Heck, my own grandfather sometimes ate raw potato and I've started to follow his lead, after being puzzled by it in my youth (silly me ). Humans and pre-humans have been eating raw tubers for millions of years right up to the present. There aren't many foods more Paleo/ancestral, despite the book/Internet hype to the contrary.


    Tatertot, Glad to see you putting two and two together and recognizing that the benefits of resistant starch point powerfully to the important of raw foods in the human diet. It's another largely missing piece of the "Paleo" puzzle. I'm hoping that RS will help many people to start taking rawness and low cooking more seriously.

    As you pointed out, even when cooking was adopted, it tended to be brief or low-temperature types of cooking, such as roasting tubers in coals and ash for about 5 minutes, as the more traditional Hadzas reportedly still do to this day when they bother to cook tubers at all.


    Given that the Hadza, Maori, Inca and others are still often eating tubers raw or briefly cooked today, why would we assume that all tubers were thoroughly cooked 1 million years ago?
    Last edited by Paleophil; 12-15-2013 at 02:02 PM.

  9. #599
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,893
    Quote Originally Posted by tatertot View Post
    Adding in 20-40g of RS from potato starch is probably the most paleo thing anyone could ever do!
    The cream dip for the potluck tonight was a little thin after the lime juice so I spiked it with some PS. Hoping I don't trigger a symphony of wind...
    35//6'3"/180

    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

  10. #600
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    416
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    It's a great question and I won't claim to answer it but I remember photos in The World Until Yesterday of pre-industrial feasting ceremonies and the floor was knee deep in yam stems and peels. My hunch is that modern varieties are bred to be more user-friendly--the wild variety looked more like they boiled heaps and sucked a morsel of starch from each.
    I find that newer varieties of potato and sweet potato tend to be less palatable when eaten raw than heritage varieties. It seems that raw palatability was not taken into account when selecting new varieties of tubers for modern food markets. Plus, old processing techniques (such as freezing, drying, soaking and fermenting) that don't involve cooking have largely been abandoned and forgotten.

    Daniel Quinn even has a name for the loss of a treasure trove of knowledge when society shifted to monocrop agriculture from hunter/gatherer/permiculture societies: "The Great Forgetting."
    Last edited by Paleophil; 12-15-2013 at 05:58 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •