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  1. #581
    Grafter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eats.meats.west View Post
    Odd occurrence - curious if happened to anyone else or the reason why.

    Normally a half hour after a 1 - 1.5 tablespoons of PS in Kefir I have a gas buildup. Not a major deal, you can set your watch to it. Yesterday I forgot to take my Vit C (ascorbic acid powder) so I mixed it into the Kefir/PS. This delayed the normal gas for several hours.

    Am I onto a new scientific discovery?
    Well, you are definitely self experimenting and potentially finding something that works for you. As far as the kefir angle, it does seem like the RS is complimented by kefir (and other fermented foods) and that the combo does seem to work for a lot of people (including those that are lactose intolerant). I'm prettying sure there was a post about this over at Free the Animal about the kefir creating an even better environment in the gut for the RS to take hold, or the synergistic effects of the two.
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  2. #582
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    I'm just getting started with resistant starch. Even though I've been GF & Paleo for a couple years I still have a leaky gut. Will RS help heal a leaky gut?

  3. #583
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    Quote Originally Posted by want2b_healthy View Post
    I'm just getting started with resistant starch. Even though I've been GF & Paleo for a couple years I still have a leaky gut. Will RS help heal a leaky gut?
    I can't say for certain, but considering that RS increases the level of good bacteria, I think it can only help.

    I was diagnosed with a very leaky gut earlier this year and have been doing a lot of research on it. Some things that have really helped me - nixing the alcohol for awhile and supplementation. There are a list of supplements that are supposed to help with leaky gut. I've been taking glutamine and colostrum. Zinc carnosine is another, and it wasn't until I added it in that I started seeing a major difference. The brand I take is this one - Amazon.com: Metagenics - Zinlori 75 60 tabs: Health & Personal Care. It's expensive, and other, less expensive zinc carnosine supplements might work just as well, but I've seen such great results w/ the Metagenics that I wouldn't dare switch it. I recommended it to someone else who raved about how much better she felt after just a week.

  4. #584
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    Quote Originally Posted by want2b_healthy View Post
    I'm just getting started with resistant starch. Even though I've been GF & Paleo for a couple years I still have a leaky gut. Will RS help heal a leaky gut?
    It seems like maybe, especially combined with probiotics. For the probiotic link, see How I Reversed My Food Allergies with Probiotics - CHEESESLAVE Just googling around, it seems like the butyrate created by the RS may help reduce intestinal permeability (see Butyrate reduces intestinal permeability | Phoenix Rising ME / CFS Forums)
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  5. #585
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    Quote Originally Posted by want2b_healthy View Post
    I'm just getting started with resistant starch. Even though I've been GF & Paleo for a couple years I still have a leaky gut. Will RS help heal a leaky gut?
    It will be a good start. Make sure you eliminate like 99% of wheat, vegetable oils and food additives. They are hell on gut. Leaky gut is actually a term for poor function of Tight Junction complexes--scientists know this, doctors don't. Googling Leaky Gut is wrong terminology. Google Tight Junction Complexes and you'll see what I mean. It's a huge disservice to mankind by willfully ignoring the real nature of leaky gut, IMO.

    I wrote this on a different blog the other day:

    I could never really wrap my mind around leaky gut--I knew it had to do with permeability and junctions. Grace set me straight on these terms and showed my how to refine my searches.

    It turns out, leaky gut is real--despite what your doctor may tell you. They all know it, they just don't know how to apply it.

    It isn't as simple as it sounds--it's not junctions that are leaking--it's Tight Junctions. There is no such thing as a leaky junction, but there are malfunctioning Tight Junctions--huge difference!

    'Tight Junctions' are a part of the GI Tract just like colonocytes, mucus, and the lumen. Tight Junctions are a component of the the junctional complex, which consist of the TJ, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. 'Leakiness' is a real thing in this system.

    Intestinal epithelial cells are where nutrients are absorbed. These are known as enterocytes, but also include enteroendocrine, goblet, and Paneth cells. These epithelial cells are tightly bound together by the junctional complexes and are crucial for the integrity of the epithelial barrier.

    When these junctional complexes, and Tight Junctions cease to be a barrier, we see chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, type I diabetes, and autoimmune disease. A malfunctioning intestinal barrier is also implicated in immune reactions that target organs outside the digestive tract, leading to diseases such as fatty liver disease and multiple sclerosis in the brain. Furthermore, entry of unwanted antigens can lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome, characterized by a whole body inflammatory state, and multiple organ failure. You can't make this stuff up!


    So, what effects the 'tightness' of tight junctions? Gut microbes and food.

    Commensal bacteria and probiotics have been shown to promote intestinal barrier integrity. Probiotic treatment also reduces epithelial barrier dysfunction following psychological stress. L. plantarum was shown to regulate human epithelial TJ proteins in vivo and to confer protective effects against chemically induced disruption of the epithelial barrier. Some probiotics and commensals have also been shown to prevent, and even reverse, the adverse effects of pathogens on intestinal barrier function. Live probiotic bacteria and their dead probiotics differ in their ability to protect against pathogen-induced changes to barrier function. This may be attributed to the fact that live probiotic bacteria are able to compete with pathogens for nutrients for growth and adhesion, whereas dead probiotic bacteria may strengthen intestinal TJ via a cell signaling pathway.

    So what about food? Without boring you to death, the worst offenders to Tight Junction functionality are wheat, unsaturated fats (vegetable oil), and chemical food additives--especially surfactants which are used widely in food processing! What foods help to maintain Tight Junctions? Resistant starches, cellulose, pectins, and some oligosaccharides. Have you heard that somewhere before?

    There. Now you are all smarter than your doctor. How to seal a gut: Plenty of probiotics and good food! Heard that before?

    Here's a link to click if you want to see where this was all plagiarized from: Regulation of Tight Junction Permeability by Intestinal Bacteria and Dietary Components Just in case you think I made it all up--lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Grafter View Post
    It seems like maybe, especially combined with probiotics. For the probiotic link, see How I Reversed My Food Allergies with Probiotics - CHEESESLAVE Just googling around, it seems like the butyrate created by the RS may help reduce intestinal permeability (see Butyrate reduces intestinal permeability | Phoenix Rising ME / CFS Forums)
    Cheeseslave gets it!
    Let those who have dyspepsia—and that means a multitude of ills which the American people in their luxurious habits are fast bringing upon themselves—try for a time the potato diet. We have tried it not for months, but a few days at a time—long enough to satisfy us of its good effects. Newspaper article from 1849


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  6. #586
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    Does wild rice have resistant starches or no because its a grass?

  7. #587
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    Quote Originally Posted by venfayon View Post
    Does wild rice have resistant starches or no because its a grass?
    It does. Not sure exact content. Normally, with rice and seeds it's not 'cost effective' to use as sole source of RS, though...too little RS for the calorie load.
    Let those who have dyspepsia—and that means a multitude of ills which the American people in their luxurious habits are fast bringing upon themselves—try for a time the potato diet. We have tried it not for months, but a few days at a time—long enough to satisfy us of its good effects. Newspaper article from 1849


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  8. #588
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    With regarding rice & potatoes.
    How long will cooked rice be ok for in fridge?
    Ideally want to cook big batch today for tomorrow & Tuesday.
    Same question with potatoes how long will parboiled potatoes be ok in fridge?

    & what's the best way of cooling the rice? Leave it out at room temp then fridge? Or cool in fridge straight away with lid open then close once cooled.

    From London England UK
    Last edited by Ryancarter1986; 12-15-2013 at 02:52 AM.

  9. #589
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryancarter1986 View Post
    With regarding rice & potatoes.
    How long will cooked rice be ok for in fridge?
    Ideally want to cook big batch today for tomorrow & Tuesday.
    Same question with potatoes how long will parboiled potatoes be ok in fridge?

    & what's the best way of cooling the rice? Leave it out at room temp then fridge? Or cool in fridge straight away with lid open then close once cooled.

    From London England UK
    I would put them in the refrigerator shortly after cooking, and not wait until they had reached room temperature.

    I have no issues with potatoes or rice in the refrigerator for 5 days.

    I am reacting to something. I will have to stop this until the pain goes away.

  10. #590
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    I've been sprinkling about 1 tbsp on my potatoes at each serving and have not noticed a major difference. A bit more gas the first few days, and now nothing really. Maybe a bit more bloating in the stomach area? I expect that to go down, too.

    Oddly, I really like the taste of it on the potatoes (yes, I get that it's just more potatoes, but the texture!), and it lets me back off some of the mustardy stuff I put on it.

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