Page 40 of 201 FirstFirst ... 3038394041425090140 ... LastLast
Results 391 to 400 of 2006

Thread: Resistant Starches page 40

  1. #391
    aussielady954's Avatar
    aussielady954 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    N.S.W., Australia
    Posts
    25
    Shop Now
    I am still learning about starch, some people are starch resistant or intolerant and so all will be a problem, esp if cooked due to lack of enzymes - weak pancreas. Dr Gabriel Cousens mentions about starchaholics on one of his articles on grains - the psychological addictions and terrible symptoms one suffers when eating starch including cooked rice, and Norman W Walker also talks about starches in his books. I am tempted not to eat any right now - unless raw, I think enough raw fruit and veg every day, raw veg juicing should be enough for the intestines, raw nuts and seeds. One has to tailor the right foods for their individual system and weaknesses. I will keep an open mind for now and let my body due the talking in terms of improvement in health.

  2. #392
    RittenRemedy's Avatar
    RittenRemedy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Korea
    Posts
    2,624
    I stumbled across this recipe on YouTube that made me think, hey I can resistant starch this:

    TWICE BAKED BUBBLE AND SQUEEK JACKET POTATOES

    Roast large potatoes. Half them and scoop out the flesh. Mash it with butter and allow the potatoes to cool (how long do you need to get maximum RS? Overnight?)

    Shred cabbage and sauté in butter and a little water until tender.

    Mix the cabbage with the mashed potatoes and spoon into the skins. Roast in the oven until hot and the tops are crispy and golden.

    ^original from Gordon Ramsey

    What do you guys think? Would it work?

  3. #393
    RittenRemedy's Avatar
    RittenRemedy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Korea
    Posts
    2,624
    I also stumbled across some bobs red mill tapioca starch in the commissary and thought, what the hell. I was going to order potato starch, but I think I remembered it mentioned here. If not, I can always use it to make gravy for Christmas mmm.

  4. #394
    Ryancarter1986's Avatar
    Ryancarter1986 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    London uk
    Posts
    530
    Quote Originally Posted by RittenRemedy View Post
    I stumbled across this recipe on YouTube that made me think, hey I can resistant starch this:

    TWICE BAKED BUBBLE AND SQUEEK JACKET POTATOES

    Roast large potatoes. Half them and scoop out the flesh. Mash it with butter and allow the potatoes to cool (how long do you need to get maximum RS? Overnight?)

    Shred cabbage and sauté in butter and a little water until tender.

    Mix the cabbage with the mashed potatoes and spoon into the skins. Roast in the oven until hot and the tops are crispy and golden.

    ^original from Gordon Ramsey

    What do you guys think? Would it work?
    Lol I saw that on his show.
    That series was crap, he's so embarrassing such a lame chef on tv.

    I tried it without the cabbage , was nice
    , the skins on a baked potato are so nice , reminds me of baked potato skins filled with cheese & bacon @ TGI Fridays . I suppose u could throw a raw egg with the cabbage mix & will bake inside too.



    From London England UK

  5. #395
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    304
    Aussielady, I am one of those people who is somewhat starch intolerant, and very glucose intolerant, but resistant starch is not a problem for me. It's completely different from what most people think of as "starch" and it seems to be helping me. It produces SCFAs in the cecum and colon, rather than glucose in the stomach and small intestine.

    Rest assured that there is no widespread resistant-starch-aholic problem. I don't know of a single person who says something like "I can't stop eating these raw green plantains and raw potatoes," and if they did, the resulting excess fartage would put a stop to that overeating problem right quick. LOL

    Yes, cooking starchy foods tends to make them more of a problem for me, probably in large part because it increases the glucose content.

    Yes, individual tailoring is important and I am a prime example of that. My experience often differs with that of the crowd. For example, "safe starches" aren't safe for me. Even so, resistant starch is.

    Check out Mark Sisson's most recent and most positive article on resistant starch. It's the safest safe starch.
    Last edited by Paleophil; 11-18-2013 at 04:47 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by tatertot View Post
    Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
    Notes I may point to:
    1) WARNING: beware of chronic very low carb diets, especially ones low in resistant starch and other Paleo/Primal prebiotics
    2) I try to do what works best for me, and often fail. YMMV. Don't imitate me--find what works for you. The only fact I know for certain is that of my ignorance. I’m not prescribing.
    3) It may aid discussion if neither of us tries to speak for the other

  6. #396
    breadsauce's Avatar
    breadsauce is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,134
    Quote Originally Posted by dancermom09 View Post
    On my list are glass noodles (tapioca) and silver noodles (mung bean). Going to try some Japanese hot pots with bone broth, appropriate veggies and grass fed beef.
    Thanks for this - I've just bought some mung bean noodles online. Can't wait for them to arrive...

  7. #397
    Muppet's Avatar
    Muppet is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    195
    So can you eat mung bean noodles hot?
    Up to 3 tbs and loving it! Nice and regular now! Feeling more energy, vivid dreams
    Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

  8. #398
    dancermom09's Avatar
    dancermom09 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    40
    I think you can eat them hot or cold. The Asian market was an experience. Found lots of versions of mung bean noodles, all about $2. Also found some interesting produce, a bunch of the little green plantains, a couple of white yams (aka lesser yams), a couple of yuca, the biggest avocado I have ever seen. All really cheap.

    I've told my daughter about this and she's on the wagon. Told her about the recent study someone linked about high fat diets decreasing the good gut flora. We both think this is true for us. It seems like there is less I can eat all the time. And she has always had the occasional latte at Starbucks, now seems to have become lactose intolerant. Will be an interesting experiment for us.

    Be careful using resistant starch as a thickener. It works REALLY well. I was making a mushroom sauce last night for some meat, added a tablespoon of potato starch disolved in water after I turned off the heat. It made mushroom pudding.

  9. #399
    tatertot's Avatar
    tatertot is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by aussielady954 View Post
    I am still learning about starch, some people are starch resistant or intolerant .
    Like Paleophil said, RS isn't a source of starch or carbs, it is strictly food for gut flora--it is digested as fat. If you try to get RS from real food only, you WILL have to eat a lot of carbs to do it, if you are carb intolerant, then the beauty of using potato starch is really apparent--food for gut flora without a large dose of carbs/starch.

    Quote Originally Posted by RittenRemedy View Post
    I stumbled across this recipe on YouTube that made me think, hey I can resistant starch this:

    TWICE BAKED BUBBLE AND SQUEEK JACKET POTATOES
    If you really want to RSify it, make it like it says but chill or freeze the potato over night, then when you get ready to eat it, let it cool down til it's just luke warm (110-120 degress or so) and add in a couple spoonfuls of potato starch.

    Quote Originally Posted by RittenRemedy View Post
    I also stumbled across some bobs red mill tapioca starch in the commissary and thought, what the hell. I was going to order potato starch, but I think I remembered it mentioned here. If not, I can always use it to make gravy for Christmas mmm.
    I'm on the fence about tapioca starch. In theory it should contain almost as much RS as potato starch, but in reality I don't think it does. Tapioca starch has to be processed differently than potato starch because raw cassava contains cyanide, I am afraid the processing removes the RS.

    Quote Originally Posted by Muppet View Post
    So can you eat mung bean noodles hot?
    Up to 3 tbs and loving it! Nice and regular now! Feeling more energy, vivid dreams
    They can be eaten hot. Mung Bean noodles are made of retrograded RS, so it will still be there when reheated. Put leftovers in the fridge and eat cold just to be sure. I had some this weekend that were made with mung bean and potato starch, that was the only two ingredients. They were excellent hot and cold. I can see getting used to them. Not sure of exact RS content, but as a way to broaden your horizon, they are great.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancermom09 View Post
    I think you can eat them hot or cold. The Asian market was an experience. Found lots of versions of mung bean noodles, all about $2. Also found some interesting produce, a bunch of the little green plantains, a couple of white yams (aka lesser yams), a couple of yuca, the biggest avocado I have ever seen. All really cheap.

    Be careful using resistant starch as a thickener. It works REALLY well. I was making a mushroom sauce last night for some meat, added a tablespoon of potato starch disolved in water after I turned off the heat. It made mushroom pudding.
    Love that veggie list--you are catching on! Another thing to look for is shiritake noodles, they are made from konjac, no RS but full of glocomanna, another great source of food for gut microbes.

    Potato starch makes an EXCELLENT thickener. Just keep in mind, when it starts to thicken is when the RS is completely gone.

  10. #400
    dancermom09's Avatar
    dancermom09 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    40
    I hope this isn't a dumb question, but I just noticed on RS food list that "roasted and cooled" potatoes have many, many times the RS as baked potatoes. What's the difference between roasting and baking when it comes to potatoes?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •