Page 26 of 202 FirstFirst ... 1624252627283676126 ... LastLast
Results 251 to 260 of 2012

Thread: Resistant Starches page 26

  1. #251
    marc's Avatar
    marc is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    44
    Primal Fuel
    Chlorogenic Acid helps with blood pressure and colon cleaning.
    That could be the difference in a Carb source shooting up your Glucose levels, or essentially "resetting" them.

    Same with Fruit, Consider the whole package it brings. I find Vitamin and Mineral content is a good guidance on the purpose it offers, but other things like antioxidants, enzymes and amino acids are just as important too.

  2. #252
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    306
    Such as from fruits like berries and apples, or drinks like tea and coffee? I do consume those (including even green coffee, which I started experimenting with before I learned that Dr. Oz was recommending it ) and do eat fruits (and other foods that are offered as alternatives to RS sources, such as inulin-rich foods and butter). They didn't reset my glucose levels though. Didn't happen until I started consuming more RS sources, and then it occurred quickly and easily. I'm curious about how and why and found these interesting links. It's not necessarily what happened with me, of course, but they are interesting correlations. RS-rich foods were the one type of primal template foods that were most absent from my diet, due to eliminating grains and legumes and not eating other sources like plantains often until recently.

    Until Otzi and Richard N. started talking about RS, I rarely saw it discussed in the Paleosphere. Lots of stuff about the wonders of bacon, butter, butter coffee, nonstarchy veggies, sweet fruits, even Coca Cola from the Peatarians , more recently safe starches and potato hacks, and here and there yogurt, kefir or kombucha (raw store kombucha was a major fail for me, BTW, even though I benefit from small amounts of raw fermented honey--very strange) but very little about RS until more recently.

    Unfortunately, I was somewhat one of the guilty parties. When someone started a thread about RS at another forum, I looked for info on it, found Michael Eades dismissing it (claiming that butter provides all the butyrate one needs). I did what some folks here did and asked why I couldn't get all the butyrate I need from butter, like Dr. Eades suggested. The gut bacteria connection was explained to me, but since I was already eating butter, I first tried eating still MOAR butter and even taking butyrate supplements (when still nothing changed I even tried more than the recommended intake of the supplements). I figured I would do everything I could with the Eades' butter hypothesis first. Then I grudgingly tried RS. Bingo! Quick, easy, painless reduction in BG levels. I'm not a fan of quick fixes, so this was quite a surprise to me. I was actually more interested in the potential GI benefits, but I'm not complaining about the BG improvements.

    So far there are limits to the improved BG sensitivity, so I haven't achieved super-high Kitavan-like sensitivity (though my FBG did drop to 69 one morning, which is not far off the Kitavan avg of 66). I still can spike my BG with sufficient straight glucose via brown rice syrup, but that's not terribly surprising. More testing and open-minded inquiry to come. Time will tell.

    Sidebar: the Kitavans don't seem to consume a lot of foods that we would normally think of when thinking of RS, per the reports I've seen, but Western observers appear to have largely ignored the fermentation aspect (as they often do) of the Kitavan diet, which Stephan Guyenet wisely guessed: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.co...h-kitavan.html.

    Others have hypothesized a RS connection in the Kitavan diet, in the comments of Stephan's post and here:

    Michal PijŠk, MD - Personalized Paleo Nutrition ∑ 667 like this
    January 1 at 11:10am ∑
    SECRET OF KITAVANīS DIET - RESISTANT STARCH ??
    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.p...27897570706809

    One commenter there wrote: "if you've ever been insulin resistant I believe you have lost all you're high-carb privileges for life." So-called "safe starches" were a problem for me. I became more insulin resistant on a largely starch-free diet and suspected that I would have to greatly limit carbs (aside from nonstarchy veg and my better-tolerated fruits like berries, modest amounts of sheep cheese, occasional small amounts of sheep yogurt, and, oddly enough, raw fermented honey in small amounts) for the rest of my life to avoid high BG spikes and other negative health effects and probably also have physiological IR with high FBG for the rest of my life, but I kept my eyes open for other possibilities and that seems to have paid off, though it's too early to tell for sure.

    Otzi, do you know anything about RS in the Kitavan diet?
    Last edited by Paleophil; 09-22-2013 at 09:12 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by tatertot View Post
    Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
    Notes I may point to:
    1) WARNING: beware of chronic very low carb diets, especially ones low in resistant starch and other Paleo/Primal prebiotics
    2) I try to do what works best for me, and often fail. YMMV. Don't imitate me--find what works for you. The only fact I know for certain is that of my ignorance. Iím not prescribing.
    3) It may aid discussion if neither of us tries to speak for the other

  3. #253
    vb66's Avatar
    vb66 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleophil View Post
    Yes, Otzi has discussed Superstarch extensively. It's logical that it would contain RS, though the makers and marketers of it have not been very forthcoming about it. Maybe because unmodified potato starch is cheaper and contains more RS.
    I went back and found the posts that Otzi made. It sounds as though they're not quite equal in terms of providing slow energy for sports performance. I'm a full time athlete and have been playing around with using potato starch 1 hr preworkout (about 3tbsp). I didn't notice too much of difference energy-wise versus what I normally eat. Perhaps I should mix it with some maltodextrin to make it closer to the UCAN blend? I was excited that I was getting the RS benefits along with performance benefits for so cheap, but that may have been too good to be true.

  4. #254
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    306
    Correct, they're not exactly the same thing. I think you'll probably need to experiment with different things yourself, as I haven't seen anyone suggest an alternative to Superstarch for preworkout performance that I can recall. If I were to experiment, I would probably try potato starch plus raw fermented honey, but YMMV.
    Quote Originally Posted by tatertot View Post
    Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
    Notes I may point to:
    1) WARNING: beware of chronic very low carb diets, especially ones low in resistant starch and other Paleo/Primal prebiotics
    2) I try to do what works best for me, and often fail. YMMV. Don't imitate me--find what works for you. The only fact I know for certain is that of my ignorance. Iím not prescribing.
    3) It may aid discussion if neither of us tries to speak for the other

  5. #255
    GrokON's Avatar
    GrokON is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    315
    Interesting reading. My weight loss stalled out so I recently began doing a 4-day potato fast from Mon-Thurs each week. On Fri, Sat, and Sun I eat abundant LOW CARB Primal (some days/meals lighter or heavier than others, depending what I have going on). My weight loss has picked back up to the 4-5 lbs per week loss that I appreciate.

    This is NOT a factor of calories in-calories out. At all. To the contrary, the weeks where I get lazy and eat less potato my weight loss is less than when I have a lot of potatoes to work through and eat more. I would say my weight loss is definitely in proportion to the amount of potato I eat.

    Interestingly for the purposes of this discussion, about 75-80% of the potato I eat is cold. I usually boil a large pot and then just take portions a couple times a day. It works. I don't know WHY it works, but it does. Amazingly.
    5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

    "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

  6. #256
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    RE: SuperStarch; I read a couple reviews online a while back and the testers said it tasted gritty like Pepto Bismol and they didn't notice any changes to their workouts. You could say the exact same thing about taking 4TBS of potato starch in water--it's a bit gritty and you won't see miraculous gains overnight. I think the magic in RS lies with it's ability to tune up gut microbes and let your body start working the way it's supposed to. Most people will probably 'feel' no different after weeks or months of increasing RS in any form, but I also don't 'feel' my Vit D or Vit K. I think that marketing RS as an exercise enhancer or a fat-burner a sure way to go out of business fast. There was another product, ThermiCarb, that was an RS based supplement for bodybuilders, but it looks like they went out of business.

  7. #257
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleophil View Post
    Otzi, do you know anything about RS in the Kitavan diet?
    I try to stay out of the Kitivan--Inuit debate. However, I don't see any scenario where the Kitivans would not have been getting lots of RS. The RS of starchy foods increases when they are cooled, I'd bet if you look into it, you'd see they were eating a lot of their food in it's 'cooked and cooled' state.
    Last edited by otzi; 09-22-2013 at 09:42 AM.

  8. #258
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Also, I think maybe the Inuit were getting a bit of RS, too! People like to think they were eating nothing but whale blubber and seal oil, but in reality, there was all kinds of plant food. From the University of Fairbanks, Alaska on Eskimo food:

    UGNARAT NEQAIT-MOUSE FOOD

    Fall is the season I start picking mouse foods. Most mouse food is found under the soft ground of the tundra. We have to step on the ground to try and find it. Three types of mouse food are: "UTNGUNGSAAT", "MARALLAT", AND "IITAT":
    UUTNGUNGSAATUUTNGUNGSAAT

    We boil "UTNGNUNGSAAT" for awhile until they're soft. We eat them with seal oil. Eating them with seal oil will satisfy your stomach. Besides eating "UTNGUNGSAAT" with seal oil, we also can add tomcod eggs or liver to them. It is very tasty this way.
    MARALLATMARALLAT-YUPIK POTATOES

    "MARALLAT" are Yupik potatoes that are also mouse food. We boil "MARALLAT" until they are soft just like we boil "UTNGUNGSAAT". After boiling them, we pour out the broth of the soup and eat the cooked "MARALLAT" in our bowls. We can eat them with dry fish or other Yupik food too. It tastes very good that way.
    By Josephine Smart

    Interviewed by E. Joe

    IITAT

    "IITAT" is another type of mouse food. They are long and dark in color. "IITAT" are eaten by mice but we also eat them because they are very nutritious. The Yupik people have eaten mouse food since long ago. First, we have to clean "IITAT" very good before cooking them, then we boil them. Then we cut them up and add them to salmon berries for akutaq. We also cook "IITAT" with tomcod livers and with other types of mouse food. We can also add them to seal meat. We start picking mouse food in the tundra in late September. And also in early October. Girls and women pick "IITAT". IITATThey dig them from the tundra and put them in their grass baskets. Only the women work with "IITAT". They boil them and other types of mouse food for lunch and supper. They make a delicious soup.

  9. #259
    Paleophil's Avatar
    Paleophil is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    306
    Indeed, you're the only other primal dieter I've seen mention Eskimo potatoes. Those two words alone should give any ZCer pause.
    Quote Originally Posted by tatertot View Post
    Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
    Notes I may point to:
    1) WARNING: beware of chronic very low carb diets, especially ones low in resistant starch and other Paleo/Primal prebiotics
    2) I try to do what works best for me, and often fail. YMMV. Don't imitate me--find what works for you. The only fact I know for certain is that of my ignorance. Iím not prescribing.
    3) It may aid discussion if neither of us tries to speak for the other

  10. #260
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Eskimo Potato was definitely used by the Inuit, The Eskimo Potato plant grows in most of Alaska except for southeast and the Aleutian chain. Its habitat is usually rocky slopes and open forests.




    The word troth refers to the plant known in English as "Indian potato", "wild potato", or "wild carrot" (Hedysarum alpinum). The word yeddha' means "its ridge, its hill." Linguistically, it can be analyzed as the word yetth "ridge" plus the possessive suffix -a' (the change from tth to ddh in the possessed form is part of a regular phonological process). Thus the name Troth Yeddha' can be literally translated into English as "Wild Potato Ridge." The apostrophe at the end of the word yeddha' is a meaningful symbol that represents a glottal stop in the Tanana language.
    A description of troth harvesting by the Chena people, very likely in the lowlands south of Troth Yeddha’, was given by Laura Anderson, the last Chena speaker, in her classic woman’s narrative According to Mama (1956:14, reprinted in 2011 by St. Matthews Episcopal Church):

    Sometimes women went poking a long pole in the ground all over. When the ground felt just right there was a mice nest. This nest they dug up and there was a cache of Indian potato roots as big as a big basket sometimes. The women put this in a basket and ate it. The mice got nothing! This Indian potato root people dug, too, and buried it just in dirt. In the middle of winter it had turned just sweet and women peeled off the skin and cooked the white inside root. They would get bear grease boiling and then put the root in.
    The [troth] is good only during the winter, when the natives gather it, digging for it under the snow. It is then round and full, juicy and tender. After the thaw it loses its qualities, becomes hard, woody, and tasteless. It is also used as a substitute for tea or coffee. For this purpose, the root is sliced transversely in segments 1 to 2 inches long; these are divided longitudinally, by separating the fibers, and these are cut again across in small portions, which are afterwards dried and roasted in a frying pan. They are used as tea, in an infusion, and sometimes as a decoction. The beverage thus prepared is said to taste like chocolate.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •