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  1. #161
    Neckhammer's Avatar
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    So sweet potato eaters ... nobody is concerned about this:

    "There is a significant correlation between the trypsin inhibitor content and the protein content of the sweet potato variety. Heating to 90C for several minutes inactivates trypsin inhibitors. Lawrence and Walker (1976) have implicated TIA in sweet potato as a contributory factor in the disease enteritis necroticans. This seems doubtful since sweet potato is not usually eaten raw and the activity of the trypsin inhibitor present is destroyed by heat."

    For more Paleo Diet hacks: Is Eating raw sweet potato bad for you? - PaleoHacks.com

    I mean I'll risk a little stomach grumbling from a white potato, but the sweet potato seems to carry a higher risk profile raw.

  2. #162
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    Hello,

    Yes, I can confirm the increased farting!! That is why I only eat RS in the evening ... (and by the way, I also skip breakfast, and sometimes lunch). Yesterday, I ate a very green banana ... it was really greener than usual, I felt my mouth was lacking saliva and my sense of taste got screwed up for like 15mn after that! The banana itself was very crunchy but the overall stuff was not too unpleasant. I usually eat rather green bananas but not that green ... You can bet that 2 hours later, I was farting big time. I also had some fermented milk and some yogurt so probiotics were having a party. And I should also mention that my dinner was buckwheat pasta among other things ... Quite some RS all in all.

  3. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    Oh, yeah... if I see floating potato I'll know I'm in trouble . Nah, I've got a cast iron gut. And everything is as normal as can be in that department. 1x/day sort of guy with ease and well it does smell like shit though . Interesting note on normal flatulence frequencies earlier in the thread though. I mean of course frequency of normal bowel sounds upon auscultation of the abdomen is part of abdominal physical examination, but I don't think I had ever seen a normal frequency of flatulence before. Interesting. I should say I seem to be normal there as well. Just decided to do this today for fun. I'm off work, had a great workout this morning... had a tator in the fridge. Nothing special bout my circumstances. Just a little test.
    I didn't mean to get too personal or provide TMI, I just find this all fascinating. Funny how one person can eat a raw potato and feel nothing while another does it and provides enough gas to fuel a mission to Mars. Sounds like you have really a really good population of gut microbes. Every time I hear people saying the only go "#2" twice a week I cringe. I think bowel health is the thing that ties health all together and people are woefully misinformed or under-informed on what a healthy gut should be doing.

    Good find on the sweet potatoes! I won't eat any raw for sure.

  4. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleophil View Post
    Mark Sisson seems like a reasonable and open-minded fellow, based on his book (which I bought) and blog. My guess is that there is something to this RS thing and he will eventually embrace it (and he has left that window open, as he hasn't condemned it) and then people will say things like "We ALWAYS knew that RS-rich foods were beneficial. You're didn't tell us anything we didn't already know." You probably will not receive much more thanks than that.
    I think starch is still a dirty word in dieting. The concept of fiber was misrepresented for the last 30 years--and led to a huge increase in grain consumption. Gut flora is a newly emerging field with lots of unknowns. These three things combined make anyone who relies on the popular paleo or low-carb opinion of their target audience a subject to avoid.

    I think when it all gets sorted out, better advice on fiber intake will appear and resistant starch will play a big role. Gut flora will be a target of opportunity for personal health and tons of supplements will appear on the shelves. It's a multi-billion dollar industry in waiting.

    The biggest thing that bugs me about RS is that it will end up as a way to get people to eat more, and even 'healthier', grain. With RS, there is more than one way to skin a cat.

    In the end, I think RS will be like Vit D and K, people know they should do it, understand the importance, but it will never be a huge topic of conversation.

  5. #165
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    Healthy Whole Grains? – 180 Degree Health

    Good article by Anthony Colpo on grains, but really about fiber. Proves my point exactly about the bastardization of fiber.

    Yep, this is the same guy who kicked off the worldwide fibre craze, folks.

    Burkitt’s obsession with doo-doo was fuelled by the observation that increased fibre intake could increase stool weight and reduce stool density, two variables that were epidemiologically linked with a reduction in the incidence of several diseases. There was no clinical evidence that fibre could reduce the incidence of any disease – and there still isn’t – but lack of controlled scientific evidence has never discouraged epidemiologists from pursuing their beloved theories. And Burkitt was certainly no exception in this regard.

    Mesmerized by the sterling quality of African faeces, and noting that rural Africans had both a higher fibre intake and a lower incidence of chronic diseases – including, most notably, colorectal cancer and diverticulitis – Burkitt started putting poo and poo, uh, I mean, two and two together and formed a hypothesis linking fibre intake and chronic disease susceptibility.

  6. #166
    Paleophil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    So sweet potato eaters ... nobody is concerned about this:
    Yes, I am aware of the antinutrients in sweet potato, which is one reason why I don't eat them often (and my tolerance seems to be lower than most, etc.--others like the Kitavans apparently thrive on large amounts of them and other tubers - yam, sweet potato, taro, tapioca, staffanlindeberg.com/TheKitavaStudy.html - I wonder if the wide variety helps avoid excess accumulation of antinutrients?) and the one time I did eat raw sweet potato I soaked it overnight (which also reduces the starch content, which I now wonder whether that is a bit counterproductive in that way, given the apparent benefits of RS). Are you not also concerned about the antinutrients in white potato and their link to more than a little tummy grumbling, including 25 deaths from potato poisoning (http://www.foodsafetywatch.com/public/154.cfm)?

    The New Guineans who died from enteritis necroticans were eating lots of cooked sweet potatoes with a low-protein diet, so even eating lots of cooked sweet potatoes may be a concern. There is also correlation with "poor food hygiene, episodic meat feasting, staple diets containing trypsin inhibitors (sweet potatoes), and infection by Ascaris parasites which secrete a trypsin inhibitor" and the infection may be "spread through contaminated meat (especially pork) and perhaps by peanuts" (Clostridial necrotizing enteritis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). It occurs often enough in New Guinea to have a name - “pigbel”: "A condition linked to undercooked pork infected with Clostridium perfringens type C, consumed in 3–4-day pork-eating ‘marathons’; pigbel is endemic in the New Guinea highlands, affecting children with a poor immune response to clostridial toxins, decreased proteases, protein-poor diet, high in sweet potatoes, which contain trypsin inhibitors. Mortality Up to 40%." pigbel - definition of pigbel in the Medical dictionary - by the Free Online Medical Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Plantains seem to be the best whole food source of RS available to me, as they have both the highest RS content and are considered effectively nontoxic. I dry them first to take away the astringency.

    Fresh raw potatoes caused a burning sensation in my tongue, so I tried drying them to see if that would make a difference. I tried a few slices of the partially air-dried potatoes and got the same burning. Does anyone else experience the tongue burning? At least one other person reported it: Why do raw potatoes burn my tongue?

    It could be coincidence, but after eating the raw dried potato slices I also later noticed some of the lower extremity pain and other symptoms I get when I eat too much cooked potatoes. I'll let them dry thoroughly before trying again.

    For whatever reason, I didn't notice any symptoms the one time in the past I tried soaked raw sweet potato, even though I ate more of it than the raw potato slices.
    Last edited by Paleophil; 08-22-2013 at 10:09 AM.

  7. #167
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    I thoroughly dried the potato slices and tried 3 of the little slices. My tongue still burned a little and then the roof of my mouth became itchy. Could this be an allergic/sensitivity reaction? If so, is it best to just avoid raw potato, or should I try a hormetic/desensitizing approach akin to allergy shots where I try to gradually adapt my system to be less sensitive and more robust to raw potato, by occasionally eating a little bit?

    This reaction does not occur after consuming potato starch or plantains, so I still have those options.

  8. #168
    otzi's Avatar
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    I get the exact same thing when I eat apples, cherries, apricots, and raw almonds. I had a small bite of wife's caramel apple at the fair last night--back of throat itched like crazy, ears itched, eyes itched. Lasted about 20 minutes.

    One time I was peeling potatoes kind of fast, lots of juice spraying about--my eyes burned and swelled like I was having a histamine reaction to something in the peels. If I eat raw potatoes, every now and then I will get a slight burning sensation on tongue, but it doesn't last long.

  9. #169
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    I don't get that when I eat those foods. Could that mean that you have some sensitivity to something in those foods and I have some sensitivity to potatoes?

    I like your term "prebiotics" for fermentable fibers like resistant starch. Looks like it's already in use: https://www.google.com/#q=prebiotics. I've got some more names for resistant starch: ketogenic starch, anti-oxidant starch, and anti-inflammatory starch, based on info like this...

    "So what is this evil chemical which blocks glucose oxidation even in the face of hyperinsulinaemia?
    Beta hydroxy butyrate." - Peter Dobromylskyj, Hyperlipid: Physiological insulin restisance: Guess what?
    "The fiber (which includes resistant starch) that reaches the lower GI tract is broken down into short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid, which, when oxidized, become ketones, such as d-beta-hydroxybutyrate, that can then be used as energy. Ketones may therefore play a role in the lower-GI-tract anticancer protective properties of butyric acid." (Ketone Bodies in Energy, Neuroprotection, and Possibly in the Effects of Dietary Restriction, Volume 6 No. 4 • September 2003, Ketone Bodies in Energy, Neuroprotection, . . .
    "Last fall, I was toying around with the Potato Hack and mentioned it on Paul Jaminet's Perfect Health Diet blog. Paul mentioned that part of the effectiveness of the Potato Hack undoubtedly was due to the butyric acid and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) from the resistant starch in the potatoes." - Richard Nikoley, freetheanimal.com/2013/04/resistant-assimilation-resistance.html

    "I have confirmation from some N=1s out there that a ketogenic dieter can remain in ketosis and have zero BG spike consuming up to 30 grams of resistant starch (Bob's Red Mill Potato Starch) per day either along with a Z/VLC meal, or all by itself stirred in water." - Richard Nikoley, http://freetheanimal.com/2013/07/bea...nt-starch.html

    (emphases mine)

    Another RS success story:
    Judi // Sep 2, 2013 at 15:35

    I am having some real success lowering my fasting (I am prediabetic) by drinking the PS mixed with kefir around 3-4 am when I hit the bathroom. I mix it up before bed and keep it on the sink. Over the past week my sugar has been 15 to 20 points lower even if I sleep in. This morning it was 84 and yesterday 91. It seems to be stopping the surge of glucose from happening. Whatever, I am really happy! I was originally going to shell out for the Super Starch, but this is obviously going to save me a lot of money. Thanks for that.

    http://freetheanimal.com/2013/08/res...comment-535416
    Last edited by Paleophil; 09-05-2013 at 05:31 AM.

  10. #170
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleophil View Post
    I like your term "prebiotics" for fermentable fibers like resistant starch.
    I don't know if you've kept on on Konstantin's backpedalling in guest blog, but he did say one thing that is very true:

    Natural vegetables don’t contain a lot of fiber unless you consume them in crazy amounts. I’ll give you a sampling:

    1. Green leaf lettuce — 1.3 grams of fiber per 100 grams;
    2. Boiled potatoes without skin — 1.4 grams of fiber per 100 grams;
    3. Cucumbers, peeled, raw — 0.7 g/100 g
    4. Row tomatoes, with skin — 1.2g/100 g
    5. Onions, raw — 1.7 g/100 g
    6. Cooked broccoli — 3.3 g /100 g
    7. Carrorts, raw — 2.8 g/100 g

    So, as you can see, even the foods that are considered fiber-heavy, such as broccoli or carrots, are pretty moderate. So if you eat almost 2 lbs of the above vegetables, you still will get only 12.4 grams of fiber.

    That’s why I don’t say anywhere that you shouldn’t eat vegetables, and I do prefer vegetables to fruits because they contain significantly less sugar.
    . Konstantin Monastyrsky wrote on September 4th, 2013.Read more: Dietary Fiber Is Bad for Sex – That’s the Only Claim About It That Isn’t a Myth | Mark's Daily Apple
    It is darn hard to get enough prebiotics from food unless really trying hard and targeting inulin and resistant starch. The fiber contents listed above are not necessarily all prebiotic fiber, either. I came across a term 'carbohydrate gap' in researching prebiotics. It describes the fact that we need about 20-30g/day of prebiotics, but can only get about 5g from modern foods. The use of supplementary RS and targeting RS rich foods is an easy way to close this gap.

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