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Thread: Resistant Starches page 10

  1. #91
    eKatherine's Avatar
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    I couldn't eat a green banana unless it was cooked thoroughly. They give me awful heartburn.

  2. #92
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    I accidentally undercooked rice noodles once. I was more concerned about it causing gastric distress, but it turns out it was an RS hack. Sweet

  3. #93
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    Does this mean that leftover rice (eaten the next day) is better than just-cooked rice?

  4. #94
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    Cooked green plantains also contain some RS, just less than raw dried. Thoroughly cooked green Cavendish bananas probably don't contain much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I accidentally undercooked rice noodles once. I was more concerned about it causing gastric distress, but it turns out it was an RS hack. Sweet
    And "al dente" (chewy) is the traditional way to cook noodles that every gourmet chef and mother in Italy seems to stress. Is it just coincidence that the traditional way has more RS?


    Leftover rice would contain more RS than just-cooked. Think of the old nursery rhyme that was mentioned earlier--pease porridge cold ... in the pot, nine days old -- why did they do that and even commit it to memory in a rhyme? Was everyone from more than a century or so ago crazy and we've since figured out better ways of doing things with our canned peas, limp noodles, refined breads, and crispy french fries and potato chips, or did they get something right before based on countless generations of experience and tradition?

    Even my own Irish grandparents never cooked their potatoes into French fries (though they did make potato pancakes), didn't eat potato chips (although the drying apparently boosts the RS of chips some), and didn't cook their bacon to a crisp (they left it limp). Instead, they usually boiled, simmered or baked their potatoes and my grandfather used to sample some raw slices of potatoes while they were being peeled for boiling or stewing. "Irish stew" (aka "stew" in Ireland LOL ) is a very traditional Irish way of cooking potatoes (since the introduction of the potato, before that it was parsnips, turnips, etc.). In just 3 generations, much of that tradition was lost. Now I'm restoring some of it (though I still occasionally have a small amount of fries or chips ) and so far benefiting as a result.


    I just remembered another way my grandfather showed me to cook a potato. The fireplace fire had gone low. He put in a raw potato and piled hot coals and ash over it. I thought that was gross, but didn't question it, because my grandfather was rarely wrong about anything. Some time later he took it out, brushed off the ash and gave me some to try. That was the best tasting baked potato I'd ever had, even though there was still a little ash on it. I should try that again some day when I have access to a fire.

    I just also realized that I've been falling asleep more easily and quickly lately, almost involuntarily (which can be a wee problem if I've got some things left to do, though it's probably good healthwise to go to sleep earlier). Otzi, is this one of the sleep improvements that people report from RS? If so, I find that it's a good sign when one experiences multiple improvements one wasn't even aiming for when trying a new therapy. The blogger Seth Roberts talks about this.
    Last edited by Paleophil; 08-14-2013 at 05:23 AM.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    I know, these threads are dangerous. I just made some cassava pancakes for dinner.
    I am intrigued. What else goes into it other than yuca?

  6. #96
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    I started experimenting with some potato starch and I'm adding it to my kefir now (2 table spoons) after a work-out. Hard to compare results as my sleep and libido were already very good! (been a PHD'er for a while now)

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by howardroark View Post
    I am intrigued. What else goes into it other than yuca?
    Not much. I blend half a medium root (boiled), 2 eggs, baking powder, salt, then after pouring the batter I sprinkle some other stuff (scallions, mushrooms, ginger). No idea if this has any RS though.
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  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingPig View Post
    I started experimenting with some potato starch and I'm adding it to my kefir now (2 table spoons) after a work-out.
    You realize you are putting these guys out of business, right? UCAN Fitness

    A more optimal carbohydrate source for athletes would have a low osmolality with a slow “time-released” glucose profile and low insulin impact to avoid the spike and crash phenomena and extend maintenance of blood glucose.
    SuperStarch represents an innovative solution that overcomes the negative qualities of existing carbohydrate sport drinks.
    These guys made a sports drink with special high RS corn starch. It only costs $2 per serving and they recommend 2-3 servings a day. Potato starch, by comparison, costs $5 for a one month supply, and does the EXACT SAME THING.

    SuperStarch is not a sugar or fiber. Chemically it is a complex carbohydrate or starch that is completely absorbed. SuperStarch is an extremely large glucose polymer with a molecular weight between 500,000 and 700,000 g/mol. Since molecular weight and osmolality are inversely related, SuperStarch exerts a very low osmotic pressure in the gastrointestinal
    tract and is rapidly emptied from the stomach into the intestines. Therefore SuperStarch is gentle on the stomach and highly palatable. In the intestines, SuperStarch is semi-resistant to digestion, but is eventually completely absorbed in to the bloodstream, thereby giving it a slow time-released absorption profile. Because of the low glycemic impact, there is also little
    stimulation of the hormone insulin following ingestion.

  9. #99
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    Otzi, I haven't really followed the RS debates, so maybe I should just ask you: would adding RS after a work-out make me more sleepy than usual? I'm doing quite an intensive military press kettlebell programme ("Rite of Passage" with a 24kg bell), I'm making very good strength gains and today I actually fell asleep in the afternoon after drinking my kefir/potato starch shake. That was unexpected as I normally never sleep during the day. I'll see if the same thing happens on Saturday, when it's my "heavy" work-out, and check if there is a correlation with RS, which I have probably been lacking previously.

  10. #100
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingPig View Post
    Otzi, I haven't really followed the RS debates, so maybe I should just ask you: would adding RS after a work-out make me more sleepy than usual? I'm doing quite an intensive military press kettlebell programme ("Rite of Passage" with a 24kg bell), I'm making very good strength gains and today I actually fell asleep in the afternoon after drinking my kefir/potato starch shake. That was unexpected as I normally never sleep during the day. I'll see if the same thing happens on Saturday, when it's my "heavy" work-out, and check if there is a correlation with RS, which I have probably been lacking previously.
    That's hard to say. I think the connection with RS and sleep, for me at least, was a steady supply of glucose through the night. I was having this cycle of jolting awake at 3am every night. A plausible explanation was that I was running low on glucose and mechanisms were kicking in to supply glucose from liver stores which requires some adrenalin and other hormones. Since doing the RS thing for the past 6 months or so, I sleep like a baby. I can't say it ever makes me tired in any way.

    Since you haven't been following the RS debates, I'll give you the Cliff Notes version:

    RS acts mainly as a prebiotic, supplying gut flora with food and creating an environment more hospitable to beneficial bacteria, like the ones found in yogurt and fermented foods. RS also has the effect of regulating blood glucose, ie. taken alongside a high GI meal, it will blunt the effect of the high GI food and cause a much lessened spike in BG. Taken regularly it will lower FBG to a manageable level but not to the point of hypoglycemia.

    RS can be found in real food, however, usually at quite a cost in calories and carbs. Supplemental RS can cheaply be found in the forms of potato starch, tapioca flour, plantain flour, dried green plantains, and green bananas. Potato starch and tapioca flour are nearly 80% RS by weight, making 1TBS equivalent to 8g of RS. A good target is 20g/day, but amounts more than 40g are still healthy but will cause excess fartage in most people.

    The only real arguments are: Do I need RS if I'm on a low carb diet? Are gut microbes all they are cracked up to be?

    Studies show increased vitamin uptake, glucose control, increased satiety, decreases in LDL and trigs, and a more robust colon; however, nearly all the studies use the words 'may' or 'possibly', so you can infer you what you want from the studies.

    I think the reason that RS is undersold in health circles is because there isn't much money to be made...no artificial source of RS on the market is as potent or as cheap as the starches I mentioned earlier.

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