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Thread: Any Aspies out there? page 5

  1. #41
    ryanmercer's Avatar
    ryanmercer is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    Ritalin is basically a caffeine pill and yet they give it to people with autism and ADHD to control symptoms. If cortisol is an issue for people with autism, then maybe it isn't advisable to give them Ritalin to begin with?

    Wouldn't be the first time that the medical community has foisted drugs on people that not only AREN'T necessary but might even be a bad idea. Heh.
    Ritalin isn't advisable for anyone... they use it for narcoleptics too when a lot of the times people that get diagnosed with narcolepsy usually should be diagnosed with obesity as it's their heart not being able to keep up due to strain. Doctors aren't advisable for anyone (well most of the time).
    -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

  2. #42
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    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Him View Post
    • Lack of managing appropriate social conduct
    • Anger management problems
    • Controlling feelings such as depression, fear or anxiety
    • Lack of empathy
    • Inability to listen to others
    • Inflexible thinking
    • Repetitive routines provides feelings of security
    • Stress when their routine suddenly changes
    • Inability to think in abstract ways
    • Specialised fields of interest
    • Visual thinking
    --http://www.asperger-advice.com/asperger-symptoms-in-adults.html
    I think a lot of that applies to me. However, since we learn a lot from mimicking others, I think I've taught myself the appropriate responses so that people who meet me don't know.

    For eg., if someone asks me about how I eat, and then says they could never give up bread, my brain thinks, "then stay fat and die young you f***ing a**hole," but my face smiles, and I say out loud, "yeah, it's not for everyone." In fact, I over compensate by being painfully polite in public. But it's learned behavior, and even after over a half century on the planet, it's not always habit - I have to remind myself that others have feelings and don't like to be called stupid even when they clearly are.

    About half the items on that list describe me, but I'd rather just think of myself as an eccentric recluse who self-medicates with copious amounts of alcohol.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  3. #43
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is offline Senior Member
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    I don't have Asperger's. I'm just introverted and misanthropic.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  4. #44
    Iron Fireling's Avatar
    Iron Fireling is offline Senior Member
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    I'm another who has never been diagnosed, but am pretty sure that I'm at least mildly Aspie... my 14 year old son has also not been diagnosed, but even Aspie people recognise him as one of their own! He's definitely more so than me... but at the same time, I have a lot of Aspie traits. I'm socially useless and am often puzzled by stuff that seems obvious to others (like I ate fish at work one day... apparently EVERYONE knows you can't eat fish at work... I still haven't figured out why it's such a bad thing :P)

    All that said I function pretty well, and my son should be able to function okay as long as he's in a job where he's mostly left to his own devices and he doesn't have to be nice to people!! (He's highly intelligent, but cares little for other people except his family and a few close friends who he connects with, he doesn't give a hoot what he looks like or what he wears, and isn't afraid to speak his mind even when he's been told it's inappropriate to do so, and so on and so forth).

  5. #45
    JoanieL's Avatar
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    Maybe the Aspie way of speaking one's mind and ignoring the stupid and mediocre in life is a mini evolution of spirit against the herd mentality that has pervaded everyday life since at least the 1980s and maybe longer.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  6. #46
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    This thread really makes me smile. For years I suffered as the following described me:

    • Lack of managing appropriate social conduct
    • Anger management problems (as a child - extreme tantrums weekly)
    • Controlling feelings such as depression, fear or anxiety
    • Lack of empathy
    • Inability to listen to others
    • Inflexible thinking
    • Repetitive routines provides feelings of security
    • Stress when their routine suddenly changes
    • Inability to think in abstract ways (as a child)
    • Specialised fields of interest
    • Visual thinking
    --http://www.asperger-advice.com/asperger-symptoms-in-adults.html

    But decades ago I was just considered difficult and socially undesirable to be with. Over time I learned how to manage these things so by the time I reached my mid 40s I was able to cope socially. By mid 50s I was doing quite well and could think very abstractly.

    Caiseal Mor, successful seriously autistic author of speculative fiction, wrote that one of the key aspects from his perspective is that he could always tell when people lied and people lied all the time - to themselves and to others. I would agree. It seemed so logical to me I wondered why others couldn't see it.

    I have an autistic cousin (diagnosed) with many others in the family with Aspie characteristics. We've learned that we can be high functioning and find a space in society where we can thrive but we avoid medical diagnoses as these can come back to bite you.

    Personally I find that the diet has finally got rid of my depression and anxiety of nearly 60 years - do you realise how important that is to me? SIX DECADES of feeling like crap has now gone. I'm now OK. The diet also loosens up my inflexible thinking - I'm not stuck and routines are preferences (maybe strong preferences) that can be set aside. Empathy has always been there in some form, but I was always puzzled that I was supposed to be empathetic but noone else needed to be empathetic towards me. I was always the problem in my younger years but noone ever considered my feelings or what was important to me. I could never work out why I was self centred but the self centred people who wanted me to think of them would never set aside what was important to them and think of me. I got over it and just lived my own life.

  7. #47
    AussieNana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Fireling View Post
    :P)
    and isn't afraid to speak his mind even when he's been told it's inappropriate to do so.
    I could never understand why I couldn't speak my mind but so many bosses and colleagues had no trouble speaking their mind even when it upset me a lot. I was rude when I did it. When they did it I was just supersensitive.

    I never did learn what it was that meant some people could get away with lying and rudeness frequently - and still wonder, but now I tell them their behaviour is inappropriate and will they please apologise, if it is. I personally don't find other Aspies rude and inappropriate - well not at all often, and certainly nowhere near as often as so-called normally socialised people.

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