Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36

Thread: Will depriving kids of sugary treats make them fat adults? page 3

  1. #21
    AMonkey's Avatar
    AMonkey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    773
    Primal Fuel
    You can't predict your children's diet as they get older. My mum has always cooked good whole foods though it wasn't primal. I've gotten healthier over my teenage years. I stopped drinking fruit juice and dropped sweets entirely. I'm the healthiest person in the family being fit, thin and good diet.
    My younger sister gorged on sweets and junk food and became 170 pounds at something like 5'6. She has minor ly tweaked her diet but she is a fat advocate.
    My youngest sister eats healthy most of the time as does my younger brother.

    Do your best for your children and hope they make informed choices when they grow up.

  2. #22
    Heliotrope's Avatar
    Heliotrope is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    56
    When I was a child, we always had cookies or cake in the house--but not chips or candy. In the summer, ice cream from the ice cream man or a cone at the ice cream shop was common. My mother and father both had a sweet tooth, and my sister and I were not forbidden anything. So even though we consumed a lot of sugar, at least there was no hypocrisy on the subject or mental stress. Today my sister and I, into our 50s, both manage to keep our weight at a healthy point.

  3. #23
    Sandra in BC's Avatar
    Sandra in BC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,102
    Quote Originally Posted by Ann View Post
    Anyway I'm wondering if by strictly limiting or all together eliminating traditional kid treats from my children's diets, will they leave my house as adults and binge on junk? It seems like all the kids I grew up with that were surrounded by junk are thin and healthy adults. They aren't tempted by junk because its always been all around them.
    Using one family I know as an example..."junk" foods and any kind of sugar were banned in the house due to "allergies" and "behavioral issues". As adults, one offspring is ruled by their "inner brat" and is morbidly obese and lives on nothing but starchy/fatty/sweet garbage, and tons of it, and blames the world for their life problems and weight issues. The other offspring is completely ADHD type A, and has an addictive personality and tends toward bingeing and yoyo-ing, and is only in the normal range because of a health-obsessed, fat-phobic spouse.

    We've raised our kids to *educate* them about food. They have a clear understanding of the difference between Food, Snacks, and Junk. And they get their fair share of junk -- but far less than the average kid. If my kids didn't eat a wide variety of healthy foods every day, they wouldn't get the occasional Slurpee or Big Mac. A couple of bags of chips in this house are devoured instantly -- so I don't keep them in the house. A batch of homemade cookies or a loaf of chocolate chip banana bread are gone in 24 hours -- so I dont' bake often. They get just as excited about juice boxes as they do about canned pop in the house. It is a BIG DEAL to stop for ice cream or donuts, or order a milkshake at a restaurant.

    So there are no "bad" foods or "banned" foods at our house. They understand that these snack and junk foods are to be enjoyed and looked forward too -- as occasional treats, not part of their everyday diet. The only exception would be good quality ice cream, which I stock up on when its on sale. When we have it around, they eat it for dessert most nights.

    We look at in on a good, better, best scale. The best foods are always here and always available without limits. The better foods are frequently in the house, and available in moderation, and the good foods are here occasionally and once they're gone, they're gone.
    Sandra
    *My obligatory intro

    There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

    DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

  4. #24
    EagleRiverDee's Avatar
    EagleRiverDee is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska
    Posts
    673
    I would say no. My parents never had candy or soda in the house. When I was a kid I resented that, but when I became an adult I didn't have the desire to eat those things. I have maybe 1 soda a year. It's just not my thing. I think that's largely because I didn't have that stuff as a kid.
    High Weight: 225
    Weight at start of Primal: 189
    Current Weight: 174
    Goal Weight: 130

    Primal Start Date: 11/26/2012

  5. #25
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    A great way to turn fat kids on a crappy SAD diet into eating disordered adults is to put them on a CW weight loss diet from the time they are little kids until they leave home. I know several people this happened to who ended up morbidly obese.

  6. #26
    Erik W's Avatar
    Erik W is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    79
    Like others have said, don't try to deprive kids of candy. They are kids, for God's sake, they burn tons of calories. And if you treat it like something taboo, they will gorge on it when they get it. (I have seen this; nothing could be less healthy, mentally speaking.) They will resent you for not giving them candy when all the other kids get to eat it, which is part of childhood. They will say as adults that it didn't do a damn thing to stop them from liking sugar.

    However, don't give them sugary cereals or chewing gum during the week, or put sugar in their tea or give them a constant supply of lemonade. What you should do is limit the candy to Fridays and Saturdays. Give them a bag of candy on Friday and tell them this is supposed to last until Saturday too. Tell them why you limit the sugar - it is better for their teeth and health. When they understand that, they will feel superior to the other kids who gorge on sugar, and be on your side.

    Ask a dentist. You will hear that eating sugar every now and then is just fine. The point is to not make it an everyday thing.

  7. #27
    dkJames's Avatar
    dkJames is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    477
    I have 2 kids, 3 y.o. and 20 months old. When I see how they move around, involving their whole body like I will never be able to do, I have no problem giving them treats (I bake them). The only thing is: these treats are based on nuts and seeds flour, xylitol for the sweetening, fruits (especially berries), dark chocolate sweetened with xylitol, etc. They don't eat normal sugar, they don't eat chemical cocktails called candies or fruit juices that I have not made at home. When they do eat some junk, the payback is almost immediate and my 3 y.o. is already aware of the difference (in taste but also in impact on his digestion). He hardly ask for fruit juice or cake when my in-laws are having the processed junk they enjoy (or are hooked on) when the stuff is on the table. My son asks for macadamia nuts, water, pieces of fresh apple or strawberries ... and I have NOT forced him to go for these treats, he alone makes the difference - let's see if it lasts as he grows older

  8. #28
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik W View Post
    Like others have said, don't try to deprive kids of candy. They are kids, for God's sake, they burn tons of calories. And if you treat it like something taboo, they will gorge on it when they get it. (I have seen this; nothing could be less healthy, mentally speaking.) They will resent you for not giving them candy when all the other kids get to eat it, which is part of childhood. They will say as adults that it didn't do a damn thing to stop them from liking sugar.

    However, don't give them sugary cereals or chewing gum during the week, or put sugar in their tea or give them a constant supply of lemonade. What you should do is limit the candy to Fridays and Saturdays. Give them a bag of candy on Friday and tell them this is supposed to last until Saturday too. Tell them why you limit the sugar - it is better for their teeth and health. When they understand that, they will feel superior to the other kids who gorge on sugar, and be on your side.

    Ask a dentist. You will hear that eating sugar every now and then is just fine. The point is to not make it an everyday thing.
    Providing kids with bags of candy on the premise that "kids need candy" is not much different from feeding them exclusively burgers, fries, chicken nuggets, and pizza. None of this is real food, nor healthy, nor necessary in any way. It is a very modernist American attitude that kids need a special diet that is high in junk, and not providing them whatever crap advertising agencies are pushing on them will damage their delicate little psyches.

  9. #29
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,247
    Hi Ann!

    I don't think there is an easy "sugarless kid equals bingeing adult" rule thingy. I think it depends a lot on what else was being cooked in the house and the emotional conditions at mealtimes, the teachings (overt and subtle alike) of the parents on body image and nutrition, any food allergies or intolerances and how those are handled, peer and media pressure as it relates to food and "treats", and the individualness of each kid in personality and metabolism and tastes in food... So - lots of variables.

    In your case, I think Primal is helping because you are finally getting truly nutritious food, eaten joyfully, that is delicious. All three are important in the food and nutrition training of a kid. Pass that on to your kids, and they won't have the same negative food attitudes as you did, which can only benefit them!
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  10. #30
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,807
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    I kind of dig the dysnutrition theory. I was fed a vague CW healthy diet--no soda or candy, but no eggs or butter either. Meat was always skinless chicken because seafood has mercury and beef was an illicit thrill. So lots of "adult" brown cereal, juice, and frozen pasta dinners. Not much fresh produce because they didn't know what to do with it.

    After moving out I definitely had a "prison break" mentality and gorged on anything/everything for a few years.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •