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  1. #1
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Wild Boar question

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    I know there are some adventurous foodies among us, so I ask this. As far as gamey taste goes, I eat elk with gusto, but have never, not home cooked, not in a restaurant that specialized in it, been able to get past the gaminess of venison.

    So, while I know it's often hard to compare one food to another, for those of you who have tried wild boar, could you tell me about it? Is it like pork? Is it as gamey as venison? Is it difficult to prepare the ribs? Or anything you might think of to tell me about this yummy looking animal.

    Thanks in advance for any help!

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    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    I prefer wild boar to standard pork, but then again I also prefer venison and buffalo over beef.

    I don't get the "gaminess" thing. Maybe I just can't taste it or something. Wild animals just taste like... what animals are supposed to taste like.

    Consider perhaps that you've just gotten used to eating unnaturally-flavored meat?

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    I don't get the gamey taste at all. I think that's just for animals like deer and not a relative of porkers. Boar was just...really dry and fairly unappetizing for me, but I had a leaner cut of it
    Last edited by Damiana; 12-15-2012 at 11:30 PM.
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    Oh wow... this REALLY depends.
    Source???

    Living here in FL wild boar is everywhere. Literally.
    Damned things turn up in the sub-burbs!
    Destructive beasts... it's basically open season on them, which is cool.

    Anyway... if it is "wild boar" from a commercial source it means a certain type of pig. Not commercial type hog. Wild type. Lean, not bred for fattiness, allowed to forage so that makes it leaner too, and also slightly stronger 'pork' taste than store bought pork. But not "gamey", and if it was ranch raised it will have been castrated and that's the end of the story...

    Now...
    Hunted "wild boar" is a very different story.
    A female or young male is probably safe and delicious... a large dominant male is likely so disgusting that you won't even want to be inside your kitchen while it cooks. It's beyond "gamey", it's completely freaking RANK.

    Some hunters test their kills to see if their male has "boar taint" by burning a chunk of fat and meat right after it is shot... but most just flat out don't/won't eat big kills. They only eat sows and males up to about 100-120lbs. that's it. Safe zone. Above that... you're risking fumigating your house with one of the vilest scents known to man.

    Of course when hunting wild pigs season and food availability affects taste somewhat as well... many people prefer them in the fall/winter after they've been feeding on acorns for a while.
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    JoanieL's Avatar
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    This is sourced out of Texas and claims to be humanely trapped wild wild boar, as opposed to farmed wild boar. It's the ribs, and the price is about $10.42/lb - have to buy three racks which is about 9.5 pounds. I have faith in the company that sells it, I've just never tasted it before.

    Cori, so much info! Thank you! I'll call the company on Monday to be sure there's no big male stink meat involved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    This is sourced out of Texas and claims to be humanely trapped wild wild boar, as opposed to farmed wild boar. It's the ribs, and the price is about $10.42/lb - have to buy three racks which is about 9.5 pounds. I have faith in the company that sells it, I've just never tasted it before.

    Cori, so much info! Thank you! I'll call the company on Monday to be sure there's no big male stink meat involved.
    If they are selling it and stand behind their product I'm willing to bet they at least test fire a cut off every good sized intact male hog before they ship it's meat out.

    Shipping out meat of the magnitude of disgusting rankness that I've smelled come off some boar hogs would ruin a company.

    Strangely... there are people out there who don't actually mind that taste/smell so much.
    It boggles my mind.
    The smell is like a mix if the most horrid week old gym shorts sweat, urine, and pig poop that you can imagine. It's all hormones. And it's disgusting.
    I understand that you can taste it too... but if there was a smell it's never gone into my mouth.
    Some old school 'red neck' types turn such meat into sausage with lots of spices.
    There isn't enough spice in the entire world, trust me!

    One single pork chop in a skillet can run you out of a house... a company wouldn't be selling that.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
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    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


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    What Cori says. I ate quite a bit of wild boar when I lived overseas and never found it all that gamey.

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    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cori93437 View Post
    If they are selling it and stand behind their product I'm willing to bet they at least test fire a cut off every good sized intact male hog before they ship it's meat out.

    Shipping out meat of the magnitude of disgusting rankness that I've smelled come off some boar hogs would ruin a company.

    Strangely... there are people out there who don't actually mind that taste/smell so much.
    It boggles my mind.
    The smell is like a mix if the most horrid week old gym shorts sweat, urine, and pig poop that you can imagine. It's all hormones. And it's disgusting.
    I understand that you can taste it too... but if there was a smell it's never gone into my mouth.
    Some old school 'red neck' types turn such meat into sausage with lots of spices.
    There isn't enough spice in the entire world, trust me!

    One single pork chop in a skillet can run you out of a house... a company wouldn't be selling that.
    Now this I don't get at all.

    We got a boar from a fellow. It wasn't meant to be killed for meat, but he was too big and destructive. Russian boar, wild. There's a large farm in PA that raises these boar for commercial sales. They sell to farmers to breed, but don't typically sell to individuals looking to butcher one. (Yeah, it's good to know people sometimes.) They're big and angry, and they run wild on a fenced territory. The guy bought one to breed with his domestic sows, so the farm trapped it and sold it to him. With some work he gets it home and it tears the place up. Needless to say it did NOT like being in captivity. No way, no how. What's worse is it killed sows and piglets.

    He was a big, mean, angry, and certainly not castrated boar. Blaine shot him out of frustration and sold us the meat cheap. The damn thing cost him more in repairs and pigs than it was worth to begin with. His meat was a little tough, but tasted just fine.

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    cori93437's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diana Renata View Post
    Now this I don't get at all.

    We got a boar from a fellow. It wasn't meant to be killed for meat, but he was too big and destructive. Russian boar, wild. There's a large farm in PA that raises these boar for commercial sales. They sell to farmers to breed, but don't typically sell to individuals looking to butcher one. (Yeah, it's good to know people sometimes.) They're big and angry, and they run wild on a fenced territory. The guy bought one to breed with his domestic sows, so the farm trapped it and sold it to him. With some work he gets it home and it tears the place up. Needless to say it did NOT like being in captivity. No way, no how. What's worse is it killed sows and piglets.

    He was a big, mean, angry, and certainly not castrated boar. Blaine shot him out of frustration and sold us the meat cheap. The damn thing cost him more in repairs and pigs than it was worth to begin with. His meat was a little tough, but tasted just fine.
    Yes, this happens.

    Some males have it, some don't.

    There is some conjecture that there is genetic component to it and that it follows lines... but sometimes people think they have clean lines and they get a rank one that pops up later.
    Some people with domestic hogs work very hard at trying to ensure that they have lines with no boar taint.

    It's complicated.
    But trust me, if you ever run into it... you will know it.
    And most people who have much experience with boar hogs or wild hog hunting know about it too.

    I've seen domestic type boar that had some of the rankest taint in it you can imagine... and I've seen large wild males that tested fine in a field test and were subsequently BBQ'd up and eaten.
    The guys I know that hunt here in FL almost always field test (cook a piece on the spot) a slice before doing the work to dress and carry out that much meat. Hogs are considered a pest species here and if it tests rank they will leave it in the woods to be scavenged if it's not worth eating.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


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