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  1. #1
    manofsteel's Avatar
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    Insuline spike after carbs meal

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    Does someone knows how many time insuline stay spike after a carbs meal ?? I know it depends about the kind of carbs index you had eaten and how much of it you eat, but if we eat primal source carbs, like sweat potato or apple, how many time after meal the insulin stay high before going down to normal?
    Why this question ?? because i'm really sensitive to carbs.

    thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by manofsteel View Post
    Does someone knows how many time insuline stay spike after a carbs meal ?? I know it depends about the kind of carbs index you had eaten and how much of it you eat, but if we eat primal source carbs, like sweat potato or apple, how many time after meal the insulin stay high before going down to normal?
    Why this question ?? because i'm really sensitive to carbs.

    thanks
    Insulin spikes after a meal are perfectly healthy and normal. Every food on Earth spikes insulin, and some types of protein spike insulin more than carbohydrate. For example, fermented milk products (yogurt, kefir) spike insulin more than white bread, and beef creates a larger insulin spike than nuts or whole grain pasta. It is fine and healthy.

    What you should be concerned about is the duration your blood sugar is spiked. After you spike your blood sugar, it should return to normal within 2-3 hours.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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    If you have a blood sugar tester, your glucose should be in the 70-110 range first thing in the morning, preferable 80-90, and no matter what you eat, within 3 hours, it should return to your morning level. If you ever see a reading over 200, that is cause for worry also. If it stays over 200 for 2 hours, you are diabetic.

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    manofsteel's Avatar
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    k thanks, it answer to my question very well
    Eat a mammoth for breakfast, eat a sabre tooth tiger for dinner and eat a squirrel for supper !

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    ....and beef creates a larger insulin spike than nuts or whole grain pasta.
    Is this true for everyone? Can you be more quantitative? Eg, will 20 grams of beef protein created a larger spike than 30 grams of whole wheat pasta? Are you really talking about an insulin spike or do you mean a blood glucose spike? Can you provide a link or two describing how/why beef protein spikes more than whole wheat pasta?

    Edit: Found this which includes several links supporting your point.

    http://www.naturally-healthy-eating....ing-fruit.html
    Last edited by Artbuc; 12-15-2012 at 02:30 AM.

  6. #6
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artbuc View Post

    Edit: Found this which includes several links supporting your point.

    Eating Fruit and Blood Sugar Concerns
    I don't know about this...I check my blood glucose all the time, I'm not diabetic, just curious, and what I see is that after a carb-heavy meal, blood sugar spikes. After a low carb meal, blood sugar goes up, but not as much. After a pure meat meal, it will go up just a little. The article you linked seems to anti-fat to me...

    What IS the cause, according to Dr. Graham, is fat. When there is too much fat in the blood, the movement of sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells is impeded, because there’s a coating of fat on everything—blood vessel walls, the cells’ insulin-receptor sites, the sugar molecules, and the insulin itself.

    The proponents of the fad low-carb diets say that insulin is the bad guy and that people need to limit carbohydrates in order to limit insulin release. What they don’t mention is that fat- and protein-rich rich foods also cause considerable insulin release.

    One burger’s amount of beef, or three slices of cheddar cheese , raises insulin levels more than almost two cups of pasta (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 50, 1997: 1264).
    One-quarter pound of beef raises insulin levels in diabetics as much as one-quarter pound of straight sugar (Diabetes Care 7, 1984: 465).
    Beef and cheese raise insulin levels higher than high-carbohydrate foods like pasta (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 50, 1997:1264).

    Even some raw food “experts” are scaring people away from eating fruit but not educating them about the dangers of eating too much fat. According to Dr. Graham, a high fat diet, whether cooked or raw, contributes “directly and causally to all of the misleadingly named ‘blood-sugar metabolic disorders.’”

  7. #7
    otzi's Avatar
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    Here is full text of one of the cites from above: An insulin index of foods: the insulin demand generated by 1000-kJ portions of common foods.

    It looks like a legit study, and indeed shows that protein and fat cause insulin to rise as much or more than some carbohydrate rich foods, independent of blood glucose readings.

    Bizarrely, breakfast cereals like Special K and Corn Flakes cause the lowest insulin response. This was done on equal calorie servings, ie. 240 cal of cereal to 240 cal of beef.

    To me, this may be meaningless to the non-diabetic...it shows that after everything you eat, you get an insulin release to some degree. If the meals caused a glucose rise, the insulin will clear the glucose, but if there was no glucose, the insulin is still needed to do other things.

    This is starting to change my thinking about insulin sensitivity--I was always under the impression that insulin was only released in response to carb/sugar/glucose, and reducing these would lead to less circulating insulin and increased insulin sensitivity...what have I missed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artbuc View Post
    Is this true for everyone? Can you be more quantitative? Eg, will 20 grams of beef protein created a larger spike than 30 grams of whole wheat pasta? Are you really talking about an insulin spike or do you mean a blood glucose spike? Can you provide a link or two describing how/why beef protein spikes more than whole wheat pasta?

    Edit: Found this which includes several links supporting your point.

    Eating Fruit and Blood Sugar Concerns
    Not sure on the quality of that web source. I found a forum with post #6 refuting that one of the articles even existed, I have not delved any further to find the original source of this

    Beef and cheese raise insulin levels higher than high-carbohydrate foods like pasta (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 50, 1997:1264).

    Link to the forum post

    Just when I thought they were understanding... - Low Carb Friends

    Here is a link to a good GI & GL table, with a good range of foods.

    Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Chart | Health Newsletter

    Beef does not cause a glucose spike through the same process that starch does, I would love to see the data that proves otherwise. So, I guess that ChocoTaco must be suggesting that gluconeogenesis is the process involved here? That is pretty easily dealt with, keep protein consumption to smaller portions and eat more of them spread through the day to reduce the chance of protein excess being converted to glucose. Apparently nuts and meat (apart from cashews) have zero impact on consumption

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    So the whole GI / GL thing is completely wrong?

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    Ah, was slightly off track, we are talking about insulin response, which is responsive to blood glucose levels, but there are obviously some other mechanisms going on?

    Well take some time to read that

    EDIT: Mark posted on this insulin index some time ago

    Insulin Index | Mark's Daily Apple

    Not sure on the quality of this site

    Insulin Index

    they say

    The research on the insulin index of foods is intriguing but limited. Only 16 peer-reviewed articles in MEDLINE even mention the term "insulin index," and only one of them actually reports the results of food comparisons. By comparison, 244 peer-reviewed articles mention the glycemic index.
    Last edited by PureFunctionalFitness; 12-15-2012 at 09:29 AM.

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