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Thread: Dairy Gives me problems but damn I want some freaking cheese. page 3

  1. #21
    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    I get pretty mucousy after any kind of hard cheese, including Gruyere raw grass-fed cow's, raw goat, and raw sheep's milk cheese, although it takes a lot more of sheep's milk cheese to achieve the mucous-causing effects of a small cube of raw cow's milk cheese. Younger cheeses also give me fewer problems, so I suspect there's something to do with histamine as well as casein. My ancestors likely consumed buffalo milk, so I'm going to try my hand at testing out some buffalo mozzarella when it goes on sale.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sakura_girl View Post
    My ancestors likely consumed buffalo milk, so I'm going to try my hand at testing out some buffalo mozzarella when it goes on sale.
    Oooh. Where do you get this? Me want.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Madrox View Post
    are there any cheeses out there that won't give me the gut hurts that normal cow cheese/dairy will. I seem to have less of a problem with yogurt and whey.

    I'm just craving cheese for some reason.
    Two things you should read:

    How to cure lactose intolerance

    Lactose Intolerance: Milk Isn't The Problem, You're The Problem; The Danny Roddy Weblog

    Very few people truly have dairy problems, rather they are developed by lifestyle. However, lots of people have gut bacteria problems. Thank a culture where antibiotics are in our dish soap, our water supply, doctors give them out like candy for every little sniffle and our produce is covered in pesticides rather than probiotics. Many people also have insulin resistance as well, which could intensify lactose intolerance.

    If you have a lactose intolerance to (quality) milk, you may be able to cure it by eating (lots) of fruit along with your milk, then slowly reducing the fruit quantity over weeks and months until you can digest it without adding natural sugars. Also, make sure you are not deficient in (commonly deficient) minerals as described in the article.

    If you have an issue with cheese, you can improve your gut bacteria by eating cheese along with (quality) fermented dairy like Greek yogurt and kefir, or taking probiotic pills, and slowly weaning over weeks and months until you can digest the cheese on your own.

    A smart bet is to start with goat cheeses, then moving to sheep's cheeses, before tackling cow cheeses. Cow dairy actually resembles human dairy less than goat and sheep.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 12-11-2012 at 11:20 AM.
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  4. #24
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    Try nice aged hard cheeses, parmesan and swiss, etc. Little to no lactose in them.


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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Oooh. Where do you get this? Me want.
    xD I get it at a local grocery store called Milk Pail Market. They sell a bunch of cheeses they import from Europe for reasonable prices. The supply ebbs and flows, though, so sometimes they have certain items and sometimes they don't. Maybe you have a similar place down in Socal?

  6. #26
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    For reintroduction of dairy doing your own home fermented dairy is a great way to start (after butter and ghee). Commercial yogurts usually ferment for short periods (a couple or few hours). At home you can extend this to 24 hours Knowledge Base - Breaking the Vicious Cycle. This both breaks down the offending factors of dairy more thoroughly and provides a more potent probiotic punch. This is in line with reintroduction of foods in the GAPS diet, which is a specific protocol for healing leaky gut and various food intolerance issues.

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    It's quite like paleo, but with a bit more strict starting point and specifics on order of reintroduction. I've seen many anecdotal reports hat paleo/primal has eliminated various food intolerances by fixing leaky gut. A lot of time you have to remove the offending factor AND many of the things that are feeding the gut dysbiosis for a time.

    Haha, sorry....just read that this was specific about good cheeses. Think everyone has already hit that though hard cheeses and goat cheese are best places to start. Also be sure they are well aged usually helps.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 12-11-2012 at 03:14 PM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sakura_girl View Post
    I get pretty mucousy after any kind of hard cheese, including Gruyere raw grass-fed cow's, raw goat, and raw sheep's milk cheese, although it takes a lot more of sheep's milk cheese to achieve the mucous-causing effects of a small cube of raw cow's milk cheese. Younger cheeses also give me fewer problems, so I suspect there's something to do with histamine as well as casein. My ancestors likely consumed buffalo milk, so I'm going to try my hand at testing out some buffalo mozzarella when it goes on sale.
    I'd say that is clearly down to histamine intolerance.

    Casein likely a lesser factor, and lactose of no concern whatsoever.
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  8. #28
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    Got some goat cheese and aged swiss. I'll try the goat cheese tonight. See how it goes.

    Then I'll try the swiss. Usually to I'd only ever eat cheddar.

  9. #29
    feren6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    Two things you should read:

    How to cure lactose intolerance

    Lactose Intolerance: Milk Isn't The Problem, You're The Problem; The Danny Roddy Weblog

    Very few people truly have dairy problems, rather they are developed by lifestyle. However, lots of people have gut bacteria problems. Thank a culture where antibiotics are in our dish soap, our water supply, doctors give them out like candy for every little sniffle and our produce is covered in pesticides rather than probiotics. Many people also have insulin resistance as well, which could intensify lactose intolerance.

    If you have a lactose intolerance to (quality) milk, you may be able to cure it by eating (lots) of fruit along with your milk, then slowly reducing the fruit quantity over weeks and months until you can digest it without adding natural sugars. Also, make sure you are not deficient in (commonly deficient) minerals as described in the article.

    If you have an issue with cheese, you can improve your gut bacteria by eating cheese along with (quality) fermented dairy like Greek yogurt and kefir, or taking probiotic pills, and slowly weaning over weeks and months until you can digest the cheese on your own.

    A smart bet is to start with goat cheeses, then moving to sheep's cheeses, before tackling cow cheeses. Cow dairy actually resembles human dairy less than goat and sheep.
    Thank you for your informed post, I'm going to check out those resources.

    I'm under the impression that we can also take Lactase pills, but that only really eliminates the cause and doesn't really cure it

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by feren6 View Post
    Thank you for your informed post, I'm going to check out those resources.

    I'm under the impression that we can also take Lactase pills, but that only really eliminates the cause and doesn't really cure it
    Correct, you are treating a symptom by taking lactase pills and not the underlying cause. Your goal should be to restore your gut flora. Lactose intolerance is generally a sign that your gut is in disarray, and we all should know how important a healthy gut is! If you can slowly repair your gut by introducing probiotic pills and small (but increasing) amounts of fermented quality dairy and natural fruit sugars, I think you'll start finding good quality dairy easier and easier to digest.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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