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Thread: Diabetes advice has me all spun out

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  1. #1
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    Diabetes advice has me all spun out

    I donít know why but I just spent some time reading the American Diabetes Association website (American Diabetes Association Home Page - American Diabetes Association) and now Iím all spun out. I donít have any family suffering from Type II Diabetes but Iím savvy enough in the ways of paleo/primal to know itís a lifestyle disease that can be avoided and usually cured in those that already have it.

    Iím not an angry person and I think this is my first rant here on MDA, but it just pisses me off. I looked through all of the food and nutrition parts of the website and itís all whole grains and low fat. Theyíll start a paragraph with something that sounds great such as limiting carbs is a smart thing to do and choosing whole foods is preferable. Then they totally derail into the whole grain abyss.

    And they want money for everything. They want you to buy their books. They want you to donate money. Why? Because thereís no money in having someone eat paleo/primal and curing themselves. Thatís why! Got diabetes? Eat some whole wheat bread. Drink diet soda. And donít you dare eat chicken skin. Seriously how do these people sleep at night?

    Sorry. I hope I didnít offend anyone. I admit Iím not an expert. I donít know what itís like to have this awful disease. It just makes me mad because this organization is supposed to be helping sick people. Rant over.
    ďYou may have thought you heard me say I wanted a lot of bacon and eggs, but what I said was: Give me all the bacon and eggs you have.Ē - Ron Swanson

  2. #2
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    Good rant...I agree. I was actually talking to my wife recently about the relative increase in donation requests. Go to your super market.."would you like to donate a dollar to this or that (American diabetes association or some other large non-profit that does not coincide with my relative philosophy of health)". I'd like to respond with a "Hell no! I've seen how they spend it!", but I'm a little nicer than that. Either way its pretty sickening.

  3. #3
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    Good rant. My mother died from T2diabetes, eating oatmeal and all the grains her doctors recommended - then blamed her for not keeping her diabetes under control. At the time, I knew about Atkins, but not as anything other than a low carb way to control weight. I used to ask her why she was supposed to eat like that, and got the standard answer re: "complex" carbs being good for you. It didn't make sense to me, but who was I to argue with her doctor? I know better now, but that doesn't do her any good.

  4. #4
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    The more I know about many of the big name charities, the less I want to help them out.

    There are still a few good ones out there, and I make it a point to donate to them, but I guess it's job security when the amount of $ donated per year goes up right alongside the increase in people suffering from that particular disease. So, of course, that means we should be donating even more, right?

    I'll say it again - organizations and corporations don't benefit from curing illness, just from treating it. You have to be pretty selfless to actually want to cure it and put yourself out of work, and that's a rarity.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

  5. #5
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    The ADA has in the past acknolwedged that a low carb diet would be best for those with Diabetes but they conclude that it's too hard to follow so we need to give people something that's easier for them to accept. First, I don't agree its that hard to follow but mainly I think losing a foot or leg would be hard, losing my eyesight would be hard, kidney, stroke and heart issues would be hard....eating low carb is really easy compared to those things.

    What's worse than the diet to me is their standards for control. They call a person with a 7 A1C a well controlled diabetic. That to me is failure and that's where the problem starts with their platform. Many can eat similar to how they say and get to that 7 and think they are doing great because the ADA says so. In reality, they are still at extreme risk for complications and continually damaging their cells.

    Diabetes is like economic issues in that you have to be ready to be a grown up and deal with it as it is. Saying it's too hard to eat the right things is the easy way and the path to destruction of your health.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2.0 View Post
    The ADA has in the past acknolwedged that a low carb diet would be best for those with Diabetes
    Link?

    *Edit* Never mind, I googled it.
    Last edited by jfreaksho; 12-06-2012 at 04:50 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2.0 View Post
    The ADA has in the past acknolwedged that a low carb diet would be best for those with Diabetes but they conclude that it's too hard to follow so we need to give people something that's easier for them to accept. First, I don't agree its that hard to follow but mainly I think losing a foot or leg would be hard, losing my eyesight would be hard, kidney, stroke and heart issues would be hard....eating low carb is really easy compared to those things.
    I think you're overestimating people, I've seen people who've lost multiple limbs and are on dialysis and they STILL won't change their lifestyle, whether it's smoking, boozing, or eating crap.

    I remember back in 1st year medical school I met a fellow who had had 7 heart attacks, his first one when he was 30. He was found to have a genetic defect, which was also passed on to his son. I forget what it was, it might have been familial hypertriglyceridemia or something like that. Anyway, he was still smoking and eating fast food. We talked about his son, who had the exact same mutation; his son was in his 40s and had not yet had a single heart attack, but according to the old man, he was "one of those healthy-eating non-smoking always-exercising types." I asked him if he thought that his son's lifestyle might have been the reason that his crappy genetics had not yet resulted in a heart attack, and he said "I suppose that's possible." I asked him why he doesn't try adopting some of his son's healthy behaviours and I kid you not, he said "Why bother? I have you guys here with all your fancy surgeries and drugs, look at me, 7 heart attacks, and still kicking around, why would I do anything different?"

    Natural selection, indeed....

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by EyeOfRound View Post
    I think you're overestimating people, I've seen people who've lost multiple limbs and are on dialysis and they STILL won't change their lifestyle, whether it's smoking, boozing, or eating crap.

    I remember back in 1st year medical school I met a fellow who had had 7 heart attacks, his first one when he was 30. He was found to have a genetic defect, which was also passed on to his son. I forget what it was, it might have been familial hypertriglyceridemia or something like that. Anyway, he was still smoking and eating fast food. We talked about his son, who had the exact same mutation; his son was in his 40s and had not yet had a single heart attack, but according to the old man, he was "one of those healthy-eating non-smoking always-exercising types." I asked him if he thought that his son's lifestyle might have been the reason that his crappy genetics had not yet resulted in a heart attack, and he said "I suppose that's possible." I asked him why he doesn't try adopting some of his son's healthy behaviours and I kid you not, he said "Why bother? I have you guys here with all your fancy surgeries and drugs, look at me, 7 heart attacks, and still kicking around, why would I do anything different?"

    Natural selection, indeed....
    Fair point and you are certainly correct that not all will do the right things. We are all complex beings and its not a simple thing. What I meant was if they agree its the best approach and they are granted the position of being the guiding authority to the medical profession on Diabetes they should be advocating that approach front and center and then have some alternate approaches.

    My main issue with the ADA is what they say your targets should be. If people had better education at that start point then it would help to target treatment and diet.

  9. #9
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    Complex carbs : T2Diabetics :: Spacing out your drinks : alcoholic.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Complex carbs : T2Diabetics :: Spacing out your drinks : alcoholic.
    Wow, ain't the truth???!!!

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