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Thread: So sick of living inside the machine. Where to go? page 6

  1. #51
    Graycat's Avatar
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    I have not a clue how to escape, but I'm so sick of the machine too............

  2. #52
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    Tribal Rob is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Comma View Post
    I want a deer.
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthy Mama View Post
    just sit at a deer xing sign. Ha!
    You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

  3. #53
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    If you want deer, ask around if you are rural. Many men want to hunt but their wives won't use the venison. It's pretty expensive to pay a processor for 40 or so lbs of meat.

  4. #54
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    Not going back to find the quote about how hard it is to live off the grid, but REALLY? If you are living Primal in the city, you are probably going to the gym to work out. That isn't hard work? Sounds like most people do an hour or more a day. Lifting weights (akin to carrying buckets of water) doing the running and all the other stuff? Working for yourself, setting your own hours to do things that are important to you are very satisfying aspects of getting away from it all. Carrying that water for my own animals (or just setting up a spigot where needed, including the hand pump well,) chopping the wood I need for my fire, all of that stuff makes sense - it is real and done for a real purpose - not just fake stay in shape stuff. (And yes, if people were working like they used to do, they wouldn't need the gym.)

    OP, if you are interested in getting off the grid, see if you can find copies of the Foxfire books - they tell how things used to be done and are a great resource. So is the "Backwoods Home Magazine."

  5. #55
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    Funny that I found this thread today. My wife and I have decided to leave the big city we currently live in, and our way too big for just the two of us house to move to an acreage not too far from Victoria BC where we will have room to grow a proper garden, raise chickens for eggs, walk through the woods on our land. I will still try to find a good job in Victoria, but I am trying to find a bit more balance, and Victoria has a pretty appealing climate.

    I am hoping to find an empty acreage, and build my own house. This move will also significantly reduce my mortgage, and my need to have a job. Once I can get mortgage free I will still work, but I will know that if I want to I can leave my job for a while, or take a lower paying job that is more satisfying. I think for me it isn't about getting out of the machine as much as it is getting out of a lot of cycles that control us like debt/credit, needing your job to get by etc. I think that finding balance is more important to me than the extremes.

  6. #56
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    It is really really easy to underestimate the amount of work needed to heat and run a house. Laundry: approx 50 gal water, heated, carried in, agitated, scrubbed, carried back out. Those clothes wring, carried wet, hung on a line, brought back in, ironed, put away.....diapers. Washed by hand? Bleah......to scald a hog, you need a really big tank. All that water: one pint weighs a pound. I've done it. I had shoulders like hercules....and then I got tendonitis and it hurt like fuck and guess what? I still had to carry water.

    It is not only the sheer amount of work, but the fact that there is no backup, and no alternative. If your food declines to grow, or something besides you eats your beef: well, you are hungry. You still worry about things that you have even less control over than your life in the city: rain, for example. Squash bugs. Too much wind. Disease: Calves like to drop dead for no discernible reason. Sheep are worse. Foxes and hawks like your chickens, and blacksnakes are bad tempered and REALLY like eggs.

    Wood? Ok, I went through a wheelbarrow load of wood minimum in a not too chilly Virginia winter day. That's a lot of wood......

  7. #57
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    way back in the pioneer days, i think washing was a day long activity. i think it is easier to opt out and live off the grid etc if you have money. then you can have convenient things like windmills to generate power, you can still have the $s to run a decent vehicle, have a flash alternative comfortable house. etc. we skin wild hogs around here so you could prob just skin the hogs instead of scald them.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzylogic View Post
    It is really really easy to underestimate the amount of work needed to heat and run a house.
    I agree.

    Comparisons like "hour of gym" aren't even in the ballpark.

    However, there is also working smarter instead of harder. If you are running yourself ragged and holding zero safety margin above sustinance, you are doing it wrong. Maybe wrong place, maybe wrong technique, maybe wrong partners, maybe wrong expectations, maybe wrong ingenuity, maybe wrong attitude...wrong. The fact that someone has tried a thing in a wrong way and failed really isn't an argument that the thing can't (or shouldn't) be done. It's at best a warning about the consequences of failure.

  9. #59
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    I think it's easy to romanticize being off the grid and outside the machine but honestly, I don't see the point. I like being an urban Grokelle. I get my exercise, eat the right foods and still get to go to a jazz club if I feel like it.

    My sister and her husband live way out in the boondocks and they end up spending a lot of time in cars going to get supplies. I can walk to everything I need.

  10. #60
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    I'm in Vegas, and it's pretty toxic. The weather is shitty (115F during monsoon season, and that's about 3 months long) and the high desert has the biggest swings of highs and lows between summer/winter and day/night in the US. People move here when their life falls apart elsewhere, and they bring all of their issues that caused the problem in the first place. The economy is crap, and we have had either the #1 or #2 highest unemployment for about 5 or 6 years running. We have the highest pedestrian death rate in the US, and I saw a recent article saying we're also #1 for fraud. It's expected that you'll be all about the money and the sex and the cars and the silicone boobs. It's a very shallow place unless you get into the outskirts where people are less dependent on the grid and more dependent on directly providing for themselves.

    I don't think it's "city life" in general that's so terrible, but I do feel there are some really awful pockets that are not good for the average guy's head. Vegas is definitely one of them.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

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