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Thread: How do those "finishers" work for you? page 2

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    I thought you were doing Starting Strength. There's no "finishers" in Starting Strength. Appropriate accessory work is addressed clearly. Why don't you stick to one program for a while and stop trying to add things and tweak every detail?
    +1 If you feel like doing more work after doing a SS workout, then as Rip would say YNDTP.

    But really, if you feel like doing something after a SS workout, add pull-ups, dips, planks, etc.
    If I just said LOL, I lied. Do or do not. There is no try.

  2. #12
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    We do a 3 minute finisher once a week at the gym. Usually it is burpees. Basically, we get a minute break after the workout and then do as many burpees as possible in the 3 minutes. I can do 51, I have to do little breaks to catch my breath. Others can do more, some only push themselves a little. I pay a lot for my gym, so I get my monies worth. I would not want to do a finisher every day, or for 5-7 min since we do high intensity. However, I like it as a gage to see how I have improved. When I started at the gym, I could barely do the burpees properly 5-10 times much less do 50+. I figure anytime I push myself and improve, I am that much closer to fabulous.
    Primal since 4/7/2012

    Starting weight 140
    Current weigh 126

    www.jenniferglobensky.blogspot.com

    Jennifer

  3. #13
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    The finisher was suggested to me by one of the Starting Strength coaches on the Starting Strength forum. I am not the target demographic for Starting Strength so I am NDTP by design on purpose. Even Rip himself told me that the program is not for me. The coach that suggested the finishers wrote this:

    Transition to high-intensity conditioning after your lifting workouts. Do a 5-7 min workout that absolutely slays you. Do that a couple times a week. This will ignite your metabolism without destroying your body.

    Ditch the long slow cardio unless you need it to train for something specific - it isn't good at anything you're trying to accomplish. It's pro-inflammatory, pro-cortisol producing, actually INCREASES your appetite, and in conjunction with lifting can wreak permanent havoc on your adrenal system. Once you do that, you will never be happy with your body composition again.

    High intensity workout examples:

    1. sprinting (6-10 reps of 100 yd sprints at max speed)

    2. prowler work (again, sprinting - not slow grinding pushes)

    3. upper-body circuit

    Four rounds, without rest, of 3 or 4 exercises:

    10 pushups
    10 dips or ring rows or whatever
    10 dumbbell snatches
    :60 planks or 15 situps

    4. Lower body circuit

    Four rounds, without rest, of 3-4 exercises, such as:

    Bodyweight lunges, 5-10 per leg
    10 Glute-ham raises
    10 kettlebell squats
    60-second planks
    I don't see much change in myself since doing this, but I kinda like it. It makes me feel like I'm more closely adhering to the Primal Blueprint Fitness ideal of lifting heavy, doing some high-impact sprinting stuff, some walking (which I do as a matter of course), play (for me that's hiking) etc.

    So yes, I'm not doing the Starting Strength program but I was curious about whether the metabolic claims above had any merit.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  4. #14
    PMAC's Avatar
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    Finishers

    Many top level trainers recommend finishers (Alwyn Cosgrove, Nick Tumminelo to name two). They are great additions for conditioning and possible fat loss. I do them and find them to be quite effective, not to mention the way they make you feel. Please note, HIT and HIIT are two different things. Finishers are HIIT. Like everything else try it for 30 days and see if they work for you. You will never know unless YOU try. In fitness and nutrition the little things that can make a big difference are best judged by your experience and not by the opinions of others on an internet forum. By the way they are not dumb and to suggest such is well ...dumb.

  5. #15
    RichMahogany's Avatar
    RichMahogany is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    The finisher was suggested to me by one of the Starting Strength coaches on the Starting Strength forum. I am not the target demographic for Starting Strength so I am NDTP by design on purpose. Even Rip himself told me that the program is not for me. The coach that suggested the finishers wrote this:



    I don't see much change in myself since doing this, but I kinda like it. It makes me feel like I'm more closely adhering to the Primal Blueprint Fitness ideal of lifting heavy, doing some high-impact sprinting stuff, some walking (which I do as a matter of course), play (for me that's hiking) etc.

    So yes, I'm not doing the Starting Strength program but I was curious about whether the metabolic claims above had any merit.
    Yes, there's very strong evidence that HIIT promotes long-lived metabolic increases. (It's covered in PB Law # 5: Sprint once in a while)

    I'm not going to argue with a SS certified coach, but I think Mark Sisson recommends once every 7-10 days.

  6. #16
    Coach Palfrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMAC View Post
    Many top level trainers recommend finishers (Alwyn Cosgrove, Nick Tumminelo to name two). They are great additions for conditioning and possible fat loss. I do them and find them to be quite effective, not to mention the way they make you feel. Please note, HIT and HIIT are two different things. Finishers are HIIT. Like everything else try it for 30 days and see if they work for you. You will never know unless YOU try. In fitness and nutrition the little things that can make a big difference are best judged by your experience and not by the opinions of others on an internet forum. By the way they are not dumb and to suggest such is well ...dumb.
    My point is that doing a "finisher" at the end of a session because you have something left in the tank suggests that you didn't work hard enough during the session. I am not arguing against either HIT or HIIT - I thought I made that pretty clear.

  7. #17
    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
    My point is that doing a "finisher" at the end of a session because you have something left in the tank suggests that you didn't work hard enough during the session.
    +1

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
    My point is that doing a "finisher" at the end of a session because you have something left in the tank suggests that you didn't work hard enough during the session. I am not arguing against either HIT or HIIT - I thought I made that pretty clear.
    That's bull.

    I think if you still have enough gas in the tank to walk to your car then you didn't work out hard enough.

    /sarcasm.

    As long as you're alive after your workou you can squeeze in something else. If someone is too lazy or not dedicated enough or just doesnt want to do it then that's their choice. To say I dont work out hard enough is insulting. I work out very hard, in fact, that's what makes the finishers so challenging.
    Last edited by Kingofturtles; 12-03-2012 at 09:25 PM.

  9. #19
    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    It's arguable that the finisher won't do much more for strength gains if you do a "finisher." Personally, though, I find that if I have enough energy for the finisher, I could have pulled more weight or sets during my real workout.

  10. #20
    Coach Palfrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingofturtles View Post
    That's bull.

    I think if you still have enough gas in the tank to walk to your car then you didn't work out hard enough.

    /sarcasm.

    As long as you're alive after your workou you can squeeze in something else. If someone is too lazy or not dedicated enough or just doesnt want to do it then that's their choice. To say I dont work out hard enough is insulting. I work out very hard, in fact, that's what makes the finishers so challenging.
    It's cool - this is a forum and we don't have to agree with each other.

    In my experience, improvements come from a balance of both quality and intensity - both of which exist on a spectrum rather than as absolutes. The argument that I am putting forward is that doing something because you can does not necessarily mean that it is going to be supportive of your overall goals.

    The bottom line is that training to exhaustion often results in a reduction in work capacity (during the actual workload) and increased risk of injury. Neither of which are conducive to an increase in performance. I would rather programme high intensity work at a point in the session when the individual was best able to perform at their highest level.

    This is all compounded by the fact that finishers are often done by Type-A personality individuals who work hard anyway and therefore appear to get better results than those who don't do them.

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