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Thread: Autoimmune thyroid disease? Help? page

  1. #1
    Beauty's Avatar
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    Autoimmune thyroid disease? Help?

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    Hi All, I also posted this is my journal where you can find out more information about me (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...-the-beginning!), but this has to do with my thyroid, specifically. Wasn't there a great thread going about a month or so ago about the thyroid? Any help is much appreciated! :-)

    Thyroid.

    Some of the test results have come in (today!), and we are waiting for others.

    Here they are:

    TSH 1.74
    T4 13.1
    T3 3.5
    Thyroid peroxidase antibody level POSITIVE

    So far the diagnosis indicates consistency with autoimmune thyroid disease, from those last two readings. Not surprising, since I have celiac disease.

    We’re waiting for the Thyroglobulin and anti THS antibody test results to come in. I don’t know what those are.

    I’m hoping that once we get my thyroid under control I will feel 100%. I know I’m doing all the right things. Please, anyone, if you know more about how to interpret my thryroid results, let me know. My doctor admitted she hardly knows anything about them.

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    Minxxa's Avatar
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    I'm crappy at reading the results too, but here's some good go to places where people know what they're talking about:

    http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
    http://thyroid.about.com/

    Also, If you join SparkPeople.com and go to their forums page, there is a Hypothyroid forum (has a butterfly as a symbol). Those folks know EVERYTHING. If you post your results you'll get a lot of good info that can help you, plus ask questions along the way.

    I will say one thing... It's not as easy to get under control as doctors will pretend it is. Most people with thyroid issues have to carefully monitor things (i go every 4 months to get tested). And you will sometimes need to up your meds or lower them depending on all kinds of factors. And you may never lose weight exactly the same way as you did (depends on the type of medication and your body and individual situation). Most people always have to fight extra hard to lose, and will have sudden inexplicable weight gains. Not trying to make you scared, but a lot of people get frustrated because they finally get diagnosed and given medications... and they don't feel better, or do feel better but don't lose weight. It's a trial and error type of thing... so just be prepared and if things aren't getting better, make changes (or convince your doc to, depending).

    Also, if you ahve any adrenal issues, those need to be treated before your thyroid can be successfully treated or the medications can actually make you feel worse. Cruise around the sites above and take a look... it should give you some info to start.

    Congrats on even having a doctor that will run tests!!

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    I have Hashis... and although there is something to the T4 and t3 #'s I don't even pay attn. to them (so, def. check to see what the experts have to say about those.).. So, when you make these antibodies at levels that are off the charts, you are ATTACKING your own thyroid. Which based on your TSH is working, and working reasonably well. HOWEVER, you are constantly attacking your thyroid. Is your enlarged? The thyroid responds by growing. It can be difficult to swallow and such.

    I would compare this activity to say lifting a 10 lb dumbell. You can probably easily curl that. But for how long? Day in and Day out? At what point does your arm just fail, and can't take it anymore. Wouldn't it be great of someone stepped in and did the curling for you? Just a little bit?

    So, I take a low dose of thyroid medicine. This allows my thyroid a little break. It doesn't have to work so hard to work... and in theory it won't fail... and go full swing hypothyroid. (which is probably how you feel... and what keeps making them test you... and then saying that you're "normal".)

    Pretty simple explanation. Hope that helps...

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    Beauty's Avatar
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    Thanks Minxxa for those resources. I probably would have found them eventually, but it would have taken days or weeks! And Twinmama thanks for the explanation. I like the dumbell analogy. I'll use it on my doctor if she has trouble understanding thyroid function! :-)

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    It would be helpful to see lab ranges for each test. Are you taking any thyroid meds? If so, what are they and when were they taken in respect to having your blood drawn for these tests. Also are the T4 and T3 totals or frees?

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    Hey Beauty!
    I have the best resource for you! There is a Dr. who specializes in treating the root cause of Hashimoto's and he has an excellent book. You can also email him to see if there are any Dr's in your area trained in functional endocrinolgy under him. It will take him a little while to get back to you, but he will:-) http://www.thyroidbook.com/

    He says that most Hashi's patients don't need meds- that instead, they need to determine whether it's their T-cell or B-cell pathway that is attacking the thyroid (and then use supplements like certain herbs and high-dose D3 to balance this), they need to reduce inflammation (with transdermal glutathione cream) and they need to eliminate gluten, as 95% of Hashi's people are gluten intolerant (and many are casein intolerant too). Exposure to gluten for a Hashi's patient can cause an inflammatory response and immune system attack that lasts up to 8 months.
    So, that lines up with your Celiac diagnosis.

    He also advises against any iodine supplementation or high-iodine foods, as they increase TPO and then the immune system attacks the TPO molecules (mistaking them for gluten!) and destroys the thyroid.
    So, the main underlying factor in Hasimoto's is actually gluten intolerance. Go figure!

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    twinmama's Avatar
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    Hazy... that's an awesome sounding book... thanks for posting!!!

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    It really is an awesome book!
    My boss was diagnosed with Hashi's last winter and she was feeling absolutely awful all the time. She was initially put on meds, but she and I read the book together and I helped her wade through all the info and she's doing great now- off the meds, eating Primally, using the glutathione cream and supporting her adrenals. Her brain is working again, she has energy and she's feeling much more even-keel (the meds were further stressing her adrenals- she would wake up in the a.m. with anxiety!)

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    twinmama's Avatar
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    And is that the basic recipe? Or are their other options??? How does she support her adrenals...

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    There's more to it than that, but those are the major things. She's also getting medical qigong treatments (a type of Chinese energy medicine- like acupuncture w/o needles;-) and doing neurofeedback treatments (we both practice neurofeedback).
    As far as supplements, I put her on a coenzyme B complex, Natural Calm cal/mag powder (it's a higher mag-to-cal ratio in ionic form), Natural Factors AdrenaSense, and liquid D3.

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