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  1. #21
    Kingofturtles's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    That says its ok in healthy people. The only reported problem was from some idiot who took 20g a day for 4 weeks.

  2. #22
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    Creatine phosphate is important for about a second. That's all. Move along folks.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  3. #23
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    If you're going to make sweeping statements like that, could you please provide some explanation or cite some sources. Thanks.

  4. #24
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    I did a write up about why I don't take exercise supplements on my blog a while back. Creatine is one of a few popular supplements that I discussed. The article pretty much echoes a lot of the sentiments already stated here by others, but I figured I might as well share the link anyway.
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
    I did a write up about why I don't take exercise supplements on my blog a while back. Creatine is one of a few popular supplements that I discussed. The article pretty much echoes a lot of the sentiments already stated here by others, but I figured I might as well share the link anyway.
    Just wondering where ur getting the info to state that long term creatine use is potentially dangerous? Is this just an opinion? Would it be more accurate to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not."

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingofturtles View Post
    Just wondering where ur getting the info to state that long term creatine use is potentially dangerous? Is this just an opinion? Would it be more accurate to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not."
    It would be redundant to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not." By using the word "potentially" to qualify the word "dangerous" it's implied that the opposite is potentially the case as well.

    As for the basis of my statement, creatine has only been in use as an exercise supplement since the 90s, so there hasn't been time for sufficient data on long term effects to have been collected and studied.

    Like I said in the article - if you are curious about supplements, try them for yourself and see how it goes. The only way to truly know anything is to have firsthand experience.
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
    It would be redundant to say "long term use is potentially dangerous or potentially not." By using the word "potentially" to qualify the word "dangerous" it's implied that the opposite is potentially the case as well.

    As for the basis of my statement, creatine has only been in use as an exercise supplement since the 90s, so there hasn't been time for sufficient data on long term effects to have been collected and studied.

    Like I said in the article - if you are curious about supplements, try them for yourself and see how it goes. The only way to truly know anything is to have firsthand experience.
    I understand its redundant, it was more of a joke. My point is that the quote seems like to an uneducated quick reader, it may unintentionally make people think that research is showing negative effects when in reality it hasn't.

    Maybe something to consider for future blogs

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zilog View Post
    If you're going to make sweeping statements like that, could you please provide some explanation or cite some sources. Thanks.
    Not a sweeping statement - just a basic biochemical fact.

    Google it if you're interested.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleo-bunny View Post
    Creatine phosphate is important for about a second. That's all. Move along folks.
    About half a minute actually, and storing extra creatine only helps reps as well as enhance the rate of ATP and phosphocreatine resynthesis following intense exercise.

    Creatine is an amino acid, like the building blocks that make up proteins. Creatine in the form of phosphocreatine (creatine phosphate) is an important store of energy in muscle cells. During intense exercise lasting around half a minute, phosphocreatine is broken down to creatine and phosphate, and the energy released is used to regenerate the primary source of energy, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Output power drops as phosphocreatine becomes depleted, because ATP cannot be regenerated fast enough to meet the demand of the exercise. It follows that a bigger store of phosphocreatine in muscle should reduce fatigue during sprinting. Extra creatine in the muscle may also increase the rate of regeneration of phosphocreatine following sprints, which should mean less fatigue with repeated bursts of activity in training or in many sport competitions.

    Typically you can see a 5-15% strength gain. I guess it does SOMETHING.

    Move along.

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