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Thread: Red Meat - Animal Fat, Gristle.. We are sure this stuff is good for us? page

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    abc123's Avatar
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    Red Meat - Animal Fat, Gristle.. We are sure this stuff is good for us?

    Primal Fuel
    Just wanted to post a quick question.. I'm very primal, love it.. really enjoy it, its cleared up my allergies, very lean.. All & all, feel great & I'm sold.. This is the way my body needs to be treated..

    Only question.. When I cook my red meat (typically "sear" my ny strip & steaks) we are all familiar with the white, hardened gristle, that is left in the pan.. It hardens, sticks to the pan, & just overall resembles something that I'm having a hard time accepting is good for my body..

    I eat a lot of ny strip, ribeye, sirloin, etc.. That nasty fat that is left behind on the pan is now swimming through my bloodstream & certaintly must harden & attach to arteries & overall create congestion in my body..

    Avocados, olive/coconut oil, almonds, even egg yolk don't seem to leave their fat behind like this..

    We sure copius amounts of red meat are ok for us?

    I read a lot of you swear by stuff like bacon & red meat.. Just want to understand that sh*t behind in the pan that is now swimming around in my bloodstream isn't clogging my arteries.. Having a hard time imagining that its not..

    (ha.. not my pan below.. just web image of some animal fat in a pan illustrating the vision of my concern)
    fat.jpg
    Last edited by abc123; 11-28-2012 at 03:11 PM.

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    Your body is not a frying pan. The food you eat is dissected by enzymes, not fried in your stomach. Arteries do not get clogged with fat. Google around a bit on recent research on atheromas and angina, and other heart conditions. It's worth burying your nose for a few days. Fascinating stuff and it will put your mind at ease.


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    Gary Taubes' book 'Good calories, bad calories' (US) aka 'The diet delusion' (UK) debunks all this. Long, but worth it.

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    "It depends".
    Ron krass found some adverse effects from meat and saturated fat together. A lot of the saturated fat was dairy fat in this study but it didn't look too good. I think it's best to be sensible and follow the "all good things in moderation" way of thinking. Just because something isn't harmful if sensible doses doesn't mean the more the better. Like most things I think there tends to be a U shaped curve
    Ron Krauss – Saturated Fat? Red Meat? It Depends . . . | Me and My Diabetes

    "So using what you learned from your 2006 study of a mixed-protein diet and high saturated fats, in this new study, you kept carbohydrates somewhat low, and fats somewhat higher, just as you did in 2006. Really, the main difference was that this time, you didn’t feed a variety of protein sources. Your test subjects just ate lots and lots of beef. And this time, you found that “healthy” blood work depended not only on what kind of protein people ate, but what kind of fat the people WITH the protein. So if you get out your Sherlock Holmes hat and pipe, what were the clues and what did they mean?

    RON KRAUSS
    To begin with, keep in mind, this was a very high beef diet. People were eating beef breakfast lunch and dinner. So this is really way outside of what we would ever consider to be a usual health practice. Maybe some people do it. But not many. We were really interested in the metabolic impact of this diet. To get as many clues as possible, we fed people in either the context of lean beef alone, or with extra saturated fat, mostly from diary products. Again, that’s because most of the saturated fat we get in our diet comes from dairy products. There’s some saturated fat in beef, but more in dairy fat. To make things as clear-cut as possible, in this study, we fed the same beef product to two groups. Lean beef, low in fat, without any added saturated fat. For one group, we added lots of dairy fat, to increase saturated fat. For the other group, we kept saturated fat low, but kept total fat basically the same by using an unsaturated fat–basically olive oil. So between the two groups, let’s say the difference was the equivalent of a cheeseburger versus a lean hamburger dressed with olive oil. That sort of describes, in a nutshell the kind of differences we were looking for. When we did blood work on the groups, the group who ate lots of beef with low saturated fat, meaning the olive oil, didn’t seem to have any adverse effects."

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    peril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
    "It depends".
    Ron krass found some adverse effects from meat and saturated fat together. A lot of the saturated fat was dairy fat in this study but it didn't look too good. I think it's best to be sensible and follow the "all good things in moderation" way of thinking. Just because something isn't harmful if sensible doses doesn't mean the more the better. Like most things I think there tends to be a U shaped curve
    Ron Krauss – Saturated Fat? Red Meat? It Depends . . . | Me and My Diabetes

    "So using what you learned from your 2006 study of a mixed-protein diet and high saturated fats, in this new study, you kept carbohydrates somewhat low, and fats somewhat higher, just as you did in 2006. Really, the main difference was that this time, you didn’t feed a variety of protein sources. Your test subjects just ate lots and lots of beef. And this time, you found that “healthy” blood work depended not only on what kind of protein people ate, but what kind of fat the people WITH the protein. So if you get out your Sherlock Holmes hat and pipe, what were the clues and what did they mean?

    RON KRAUSS
    To begin with, keep in mind, this was a very high beef diet. People were eating beef breakfast lunch and dinner. So this is really way outside of what we would ever consider to be a usual health practice. Maybe some people do it. But not many. We were really interested in the metabolic impact of this diet. To get as many clues as possible, we fed people in either the context of lean beef alone, or with extra saturated fat, mostly from diary products. Again, that’s because most of the saturated fat we get in our diet comes from dairy products. There’s some saturated fat in beef, but more in dairy fat. To make things as clear-cut as possible, in this study, we fed the same beef product to two groups. Lean beef, low in fat, without any added saturated fat. For one group, we added lots of dairy fat, to increase saturated fat. For the other group, we kept saturated fat low, but kept total fat basically the same by using an unsaturated fat–basically olive oil. So between the two groups, let’s say the difference was the equivalent of a cheeseburger versus a lean hamburger dressed with olive oil. That sort of describes, in a nutshell the kind of differences we were looking for. When we did blood work on the groups, the group who ate lots of beef with low saturated fat, meaning the olive oil, didn’t seem to have any adverse effects."
    Yes, it seems that it isn't the saturated fat that is the problem but the excessive consumption of muscle meat. Better to eat nose-to-tail than to "eat a lot of ny strip, ribeye, sirloin, etc."
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    Unless you are injecting the fat into your veins like a junky it will be digested in the gut.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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  7. #7
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    Forgot, what were the adverse effects in the study? Was it just increased small particles, or am I thinking of something else? I really don't feel like reading the thing.

    And based on what you quoted about the study design, it seems to be more of an indictment against dairy than anything. Am I wrong?
    Last edited by Timthetaco; 11-28-2012 at 05:55 PM. Reason: screwed up the dude's name

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    Quote Originally Posted by peril View Post
    Yes, it seems that it isn't the saturated fat that is the problem but the excessive consumption of muscle meat. Better to eat nose-to-tail than to "eat a lot of ny strip, ribeye, sirloin, etc."
    But there seemed to be no adverse effects with white meat which is why it could have to do with the iron.

    Quote Originally Posted by Timthetaco View Post
    Forgot, what were the adverse effects in the study? Was it just increased small particles, or am I thinking of something else? I really don't feel like reading the thing.

    And based on what you quoted about the study design, it seems to be more of an indictment against dairy than anything. Am I wrong?
    The adverse effects were heart disease risk, inflammation and diabetes risk factors. It could be the dairy, but if the problems are from increased iron absorption then tallow (beef fat) could be a problem because it increases the absorption of iron apparently, along with stearic acid which is found abundantly in dairy fat.
    Last edited by Forgotmylastusername; 11-28-2012 at 06:50 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthetaco View Post
    Forgot, what were the adverse effects in the study? Was it just increased small particles, or am I thinking of something else? I really don't feel like reading the thing.

    And based on what you quoted about the study design, it seems to be more of an indictment against dairy than anything. Am I wrong?
    Yeah, Krauss attributes the accumulation of congestive plaque building to consumption of foods accompanying the animal fats, not necessarily the animal fat itself.. Notably the carbohydrate & inflammation causing properties (certaintly glutens, sugars, & veg oils.. In some carb-sensitive bodies may even include starches)

    He does stress the dairy fat as culprit vs animal fat..

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