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Thread: Where did Paleolithic man get his calcium from? page 2

  1. #11
    Lukey's Avatar
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    What is your take on it then? do you recommend a high or low calcium intake?

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    Just pulled up a few lists on Google, here are some options:

    Sardines contain 325 mg of calcium per 3 ounces.
    Pink salmon offers 181 mg of calcium per three ounces.
    A half cup of collard greens has 178 mg of calcium.
    One tablespoon of blackstrap molasses offers 172 mg of calcium.
    Other types of greens, nuts, okra show up as being calcium rich food sources.

  3. #13
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    I get a lot of calcium from fish bones. Bone broth is another option. Also, vegetables have a lot of calcium. Dairy is actually a poor source of calcium.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Heaviest squat: 180 x 2. Heaviest Deadlift: 230 x 2

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukey View Post
    ... It seems that it would be very hard to get anywhere near the supposed RDA of calcium without dairy or fortified foods. Any thoughts on if calcium is that important, and if so where did Paleolithic man get his from?
    If you look at it like early man originated near the oceans, it's easy to see where he got his calcium. Fish, esp little bony fish, seaweed, bird eggs, shellfish, etc... But where did he get it when he moved inland? Like the North American Indians of the plains?

    I was in a quandry over this as well, and also wondered about iodine. Any animal with bones needs calcium and any animal with a thyroid needs iodine...so that pretty much is every living animal.

    If you raise horses, you need to supplement their food with 10mg of iodine and and 20g of calcium. The rda for humans is 150mcg iodine and 1g calcium. So where in the hell do wild horses get that much iodine and calcium?

    Turns out, that in the wild, they get all of both from drinking water that standing on the earth (mud puddles) and also from eating the dirt clinging to plant roots they are eating. So, when I see all those wild critters around the world who seem to be doing just fine with the minerals they need to survive, I worry a little bit less.

    I think what we really need to worry about is the RDA's we use. I think it seems to be built around the nutrition you get from eating a grain-based diet.

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    The foods and vegetables you see available to you in the supermarket are literally 1/100th of what was available in the wild 20,000 years ago. Even some wild nuts today in the Australian bush contain even more calcium than dairy products. Insects are high in calcium too.

  6. #16
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    Paleothic man also happened to be a hell of a lot shorter than modern humans though, perhaps due to the lack of dairy. I imagine they ate more bones (like in fish), so they wouldn't be deficient.

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    I like to eat the tails of my shrimp. Calcium carbonate.

    Some wild animals (like moose) get goiter and native cultures around the region we call the mid-west would seek out those animals with large thyroids and eat them, especially giving them to pregnant women. There was a lot of old knowledge that we moderns have lost.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Heaviest squat: 180 x 2. Heaviest Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    Even freshwater fish has some iodine. Also people underestimate how far trade routes extended. It was possible to find dried seafood from the Pacific Northwest being traded to the plains tribes.

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    so at the moment I am not really getting that much calcium, only some from broccoli and cheese, should i up my intake of calcium? I am also getting 1500IU of Vitamin D a day just for reference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AMonkey View Post
    Paleothic man also happened to be a hell of a lot shorter than modern humans though, perhaps due to the lack of dairy. I imagine they ate more bones (like in fish), so they wouldn't be deficient.
    Actually, the archaeological record shows us that Paleolithic H. sapiens was tall in most places - often well upwards of 6ft. Even pre-humans like H. erectus were often 6 footers.

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