Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 95

Thread: Are we really genetically similar to the paleo men and women? page 2

  1. #11
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    8,711
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by paul900 View Post
    NEANDERTHALS ATE GRAINS, THIS IS A FACT
    Font size 5. Well, now we know you are another wacko with an agenda. Thanks for stopping by.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 190 x 3

  2. #12
    paul900's Avatar
    paul900 Guest
    I don't have an agenda at all I am just pointing out a fact. This is a known fact my dear

  3. #13
    paul900's Avatar
    paul900 Guest
    Lets see what Mr. PhD has to say now....

  4. #14
    bdilla's Avatar
    bdilla is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    218
    Actually, paleolithic peoples eating grains has never been documented, and many trusted sources disagree. (See: Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel, as well as Spencer Wells' Pandora's Seed)

    The evidence is also pretty clear that 10,000 years is not nearly enough time for any significant genetic adaptations to occur. We are, in fact, essentially identical to our paleolithic ancestors. The only thing I've seen that contradicts paleo/primal is the 12 year study of paleolithic nutrition, which estimates the paleolithic macro intake and explains that we likely consumed legumes as part of the diet: http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v...f/1600389a.pdf
    this great blue world of ours seems a house of leaves, moments before the wind

  5. #15
    The Scientist's Avatar
    The Scientist is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    79
    You made three claims here, and I'll try to respond to each:

    1. "The child will eat grains from Day 1 and probably live to the age of 70 when he or she will die of health related issues (we can't say for sure these are grain related health issues but I would concede that dietary choices most likely lead to the death of the person). So essentially the body has coped with daily consumption of grains for 70 years. Could paleolithic people have done that? hardly. Therefore we are very different to the paleolithic man."

    You are making the mistake of directly comparing the two environments. We live in a world where grains (and sugar, and nearly everything else) is freely available year round. A paleolithic community would have had chronic food shortages, making it impossible to over-eat consistently. They also would have been much more active than we are. I think that the downsides of grains are most pronounced when they are over-consumed and combined with a sedentary existence. The paleolithic people we are talking about would not have had the option to over-eat. In fact, archeological evidence clearly shows that when a population of people transitions from a hunter/gatherer strategy to agriculture, their health (evidenced by shorter stature and smaller bones) declines. Grains allowed populations to explode in number because total calories increased, but this just spread more calories among more people, leaving each individual short on food and especially short on nutrients because of grain consumption instead of animal/plant food. So, you are right in one way – we are very different from paleolithic man in our environment. We are not significantly different genetically for the vast majority of our genome.

    2. "As an aside, the paleolithic man was all over the world so his diet depended on the environment. Paleo asians ate differently to paleo africans and paleo europeans and paleo americans etc. So do we look at our genetic heritage to look at what our particular paleo ancestors ate and then replicate that? "

    This is true. Individual components varied. What they had in common was a diet filled with meat, seafood, nuts and vegetables and fruits (native fruit, not the artificially selected bags of sugar we call fruit)

    3. "And another thing about dairy, do you really think paleo people didn't drink milk? I mean seriously, of course they drank milk. This is another con that the paleo gurus try to pull."

    I hate to be harsh, but this clearly shows that you don't understand what you are talking about. The paleolithic period is defined as the time prior to the advent of agriculture and domestication of animals. Given that there were no domesticated animals at the time, you must be suggesting that these people captured a female mammal that had recently given birth, tied her down, and milked her before going in for the kill and enjoying the meat.

  6. #16
    shep68's Avatar
    shep68 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    105
    This has been addressed here:

    Is Modern Wheat Unhealthy? | Mark's Daily Apple

    The wheat eaten by our paleo ancestors is not the wheat eaten today. It is a genetically modified "dwarf" variant designed towards high yield and high empty calorie in order to feed an ever growing population. I'm always a little torn regarding this subject because modern agriculture has allowed our society to advance in many positive ways, and more closer to home has provided a good living to members of my extended family. I'm not a researcher or a scientist so I can only rely on the work others have done and decide for myself whether or not I believe it. I believe the above referenced article because for me the proof is in the pudding: serious weight loss, better blood work, no more indigestion or acid reflux, better sleep, happier disposition and all around feeling of general well being. Tells me Sisson, Cordain, Wolf and others (backed by lots of science) are on the right track.

  7. #17
    paul900's Avatar
    paul900 Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by The Scientist View Post
    You made three claims here, and I'll try to respond to each:

    1. "The child will eat grains from Day 1 and probably live to the age of 70 when he or she will die of health related issues (we can't say for sure these are grain related health issues but I would concede that dietary choices most likely lead to the death of the person). So essentially the body has coped with daily consumption of grains for 70 years. Could paleolithic people have done that? hardly. Therefore we are very different to the paleolithic man."

    You are making the mistake of directly comparing the two environments. We live in a world where grains (and sugar, and nearly everything else) is freely available year round. A paleolithic community would have had chronic food shortages, making it impossible to over-eat consistently. They also would have been much more active than we are. I think that the downsides of grains are most pronounced when they are over-consumed and combined with a sedentary existence. The paleolithic people we are talking about would not have had the option to over-eat. In fact, archeological evidence clearly shows that when a population of people transitions from a hunter/gatherer strategy to agriculture, their health (evidenced by shorter stature and smaller bones) declines. Grains allowed populations to explode in number because total calories increased, but this just spread more calories among more people, leaving each individual short on food and especially short on nutrients because of grain consumption instead of animal/plant food. So, you are right in one way – we are very different from paleolithic man in our environment. We are not significantly different genetically for the vast majority of our genome.

    2. "As an aside, the paleolithic man was all over the world so his diet depended on the environment. Paleo asians ate differently to paleo africans and paleo europeans and paleo americans etc. So do we look at our genetic heritage to look at what our particular paleo ancestors ate and then replicate that? "

    This is true. Individual components varied. What they had in common was a diet filled with meat, seafood, nuts and vegetables and fruits (native fruit, not the artificially selected bags of sugar we call fruit)

    3. "And another thing about dairy, do you really think paleo people didn't drink milk? I mean seriously, of course they drank milk. This is another con that the paleo gurus try to pull."

    I hate to be harsh, but this clearly shows that you don't understand what you are talking about. The paleolithic period is defined as the time prior to the advent of agriculture and domestication of animals. Given that there were no domesticated animals at the time, you must be suggesting that these people captured a female mammal that had recently given birth, tied her down, and milked her before going in for the kill and enjoying the meat.

    I will concede to your points about the domestication of animals. Perhaps the paleo man did not drink milk. I was under the idea that they had animals to enjoy but it seems I am wrong. I am not afraid to admit I am wrong about things

    I also agree with your first paragraph. Paleo man was NEVER obese so clearly the way we use grains today is quite different.

    To be honest, I can't disagree with your post at all.

  8. #18
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    8,711
    Quote Originally Posted by paul900 View Post
    I don't have an agenda at all I am just pointing out a fact. This is a known fact my dear
    And my little sweet pea, I am remarking about the size of the font you chose, not the statement you made. Size matters, you know, and it appears you have a need to overcompensate.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 190 x 3

  9. #19
    The Scientist's Avatar
    The Scientist is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    79
    I'm trying to understand how one of the most reasonable and rational arguments I have ever had wound up taking place in an online forum. Thank you for being open-minded about it.

  10. #20
    Terry H's Avatar
    Terry H is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    667
    PrimalCon New York
    Keep posting, wd.'ya? Both you and the OP especially (but not exclusively-everyone was good).

Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •