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    Drlove's Avatar
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    Pasteurizing egg yolks for mayo

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    Hey,

    So in the other post I asked about the Mayo itself.
    Now about the egg yolks: Can I put the egg yolks in a bowel, and then in the oven for 2-3 minutes in 140-150 degrees? (fahrenheit). Will it pasteurize them?

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    For milk the temperature is about 160. I have no idea whether or not that would cook the eggs.

    I've eaten plenty of raw eggs before and never been sickened by them. Might be more of a hassle than its worth.
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    Yah but I guess it depends on your country. Here in my country they advise to throughly cook the eggs. Maybe that's an exaggeration, but better be safe than sorry. The primary question is, will the oven temperature work? or is it problematic to do it in the oven.

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    No... you cannot put them in for a couple of min and have them pasteurized. They must be heated all the way through, and if you heat an an unprotected yolk to that temp it will begin to cook and not be good for making mayo.

    All countries advise that you cook eggs thoroughly for safety... it's a load of silliness really. You are probably more likely to be struck by lightening than get salmonella from an egg... Do you drive a car by chance, FAR more dangerous! Anyway.
    Now... what may work better if you are really afraid of making mayo with raw yolks... I'm not afraid of this and have eaten homemade mayo with RAW chicken yolks for nearly the entire 40 years I've been alive... is to work on learning how to make a good and proper coddled egg. As in soft boiled, where the white is cooked but the yolk is not set at all.

    Perfect Soft Boiled Eggs Recipe - Food.com - 163724
    Such as this... but maybe even a little shorter cook time.
    You then allow the eggs to cool. Cut the tops off, and pour the yolks out to make mayo.
    The Mayonnaise is harder to make this way as the yolks have been heated and lost some of their structure quality in the process... you may need more yolk than normal for the process. But you can try it.
    Does your country not sell "pasteurized eggs" at the grocery?
    Last edited by cori93437; 11-21-2012 at 09:41 AM.
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    Drlove's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cori93437 View Post
    No... you cannot put them in for a couple of min and have them pasteurized. They must be heated all the way through, and if you heat an an unprotected yolk to that temp it will begin to cook and not be good for making mayo.

    All countries advise that you cook eggs thoroughly for safety... it's a load of silliness really. You are probably more likely to be struck by lightening than get salmonella from an egg... Do you drive a car by chance, FAR more dangerous! Anyway.
    Now... what may work better if you are really afraid of making mayo with raw yolks... I'm not afraid of this and have eaten homemade mayo with RAW chicken yolks for nearly the entire 40 years I've been alive... is to work on learning how to make a good and proper coddled egg. As in soft boiled, where the white is cooked but the yolk is not set at all.

    Perfect Soft Boiled Eggs Recipe - Food.com - 163724
    Such as this... but maybe even a little shorter cook time.
    You then allow the eggs to cool. Cut the tops off, and pour the yolks out to make mayo.
    The Mayonnaise is harder to make this way as the yolks have been heated and lost some of their structure quality in the process... you may need more yolk than normal for the process. But you can try it.
    Does your country not sell "pasteurized eggs" at the grocery?
    Thanks for the reply. I might try to soft boil them. And nope, my country doesn't sell pasteurized eggs.

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    Let me google that for you

    However, if you have quality eggs from a reliable source, I see no real need for pasteurization, particularly if you wash the shells before cracking the eggs. About 1 in 30,000 eggs is contaminated with salmonella, and in most cases the contamination is only on the exterior of the egg, so proper washing of hands and the exterior of the egg reduces risk even further, as does buying non-CAFO eggs (which are most likely to be contaminated because of the conditions in which the chickens live).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    Let me google that for you

    However, if you have quality eggs from a reliable source, I see no real need for pasteurization, particularly if you wash the shells before cracking the eggs. About 1 in 30,000 eggs is contaminated with salmonella, and in most cases the contamination is only on the exterior of the egg, so proper washing of hands and the exterior of the egg reduces risk even further, as does buying non-CAFO eggs (which are most likely to be contaminated because of the conditions in which the chickens live).
    I frankly did google it. I just found no reference to using an oven, and that was my primary concern.
    We've simply been constantly warned about the dangers of salmonella, so it got to us. Though I think this negligible risk must be much safer than hellmans' mayo.

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    The reason you don't see oven methods is because to pasteurize and not cook the egg you must raise it to temperature quite quickly for the required period of time and them remove it from the heat. An oven does not do this terribly well. If you don't have a microwave, there are a number of techniques that work on the stove either by boiling the whole egg or heating the egg yolk in a double boiler (and I would assume you'd have the option of using a stovetop method if you have an oven).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    The reason you don't see oven methods is because to pasteurize and not cook the egg you must raise it to temperature quite quickly for the required period of time and them remove it from the heat. An oven does not do this terribly well. If you don't have a microwave, there are a number of techniques that work on the stove either by boiling the whole egg or heating the egg yolk in a double boiler (and I would assume you'd have the option of using a stovetop method if you have an oven).
    I see, makes sense. I think I'll use one of the methods you mentioned, thanks.

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    Some time ago I began eating eggs raw. This was at a time when I was still buying my eggs from the grocery store. For my own curiosity I looked up the actual risk of getting sick from raw eggs.

    If you're eating crappy grocery store eggs, your risk is still only 1 in 30,000. That's pretty slim. Don't worry about it. Just make the mayo.

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