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  1. #1
    fateater's Avatar
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    Feeling Cold Lately

    I haven't experienced this feeling cold all the time for years - last time was when I was underweight and not eating much, and vegetarian.

    Now I'm a healthy weight with a bit of excess body fat (rough estimate 27%), eating primal high fat lower carb, the past 2 months but most strictly the past 2 weeks.

    Suddenly I'm feeling really really cold, often after a meal, which seems counterintuitive to me. I'd think I would be warmer afterwards when my metabolism is burning the food energy?

    I eat high fat, moderate protein and low carb. I'm female, not much of an exerciser except functional (walk everywhere, errands/groceries, carry 40lb child, play with child). Sometimes I bust out some squats or lunges but I'm generally too tired to push out a real workout.

    As I mentioned, I'm new to eating this way, and while I want to shift body fat, more than that I need to feel BETTER and more alive. I've noticed a balancing of my mood already, which is wonderful.

    Could I be deficient in something? Or is this just my body adjusting? Before this I was eating high carb, low fat... didn't feel cold but it was summer too.

    Oh I average about 2400 calories per day, never under 2200 in the past 2 weeks since I started tracking to help get an idea of this new way of eating. I'm stopping today actually, because I don't want the constant focus on food. I think I have a good enough idea of macronutrient ratios to get going now.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Nady's Avatar
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    I feel cold when I'm dehydrated. Interesting when I'm out in 110 ~ try drinking something to replenish your electrolytes and up your salt a bit.

  3. #3
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    RaeVynn is offline Senior Member
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    try walking barefoot outside - let your body know that it is getting cold out, and that it needs to bump up the warmth factor

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    fateater's Avatar
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    Interesting - I'll try both. More water, and some barefoot earth time

    Thanks

  5. #5
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    I think your diet is right for the winter, but maybe hindered you last summer.

    I live in Alaska, have for over 30 years. Up until a few years ago, I ate a real crap diet and paid the price. Last few years on Primal have been a game changer for me. In the past, I would bundle up and really hated getting cold. I would 'carb-up' and get fatter each winter watching TV til bedtime.

    The last few years, I focused real hard on using the winter to my advantage. All summer, I eat tons of veggies and seasonal fruit, bananas, pineapple, sweet corn, tomatoes, etc... As fall progresses, I get into nuts, potatoes, squash and start avoiding the fruit. From Nov - Feb, I like to eat like you, lots of fish, meat and fat, mushrooms, cheese, eggs, blueberries, but almost zero fruit and low carbs.

    Eating like this sets you up for a cold winter. The natural way is to lean out through the hard, cold times in winter and fatten up in summer. There's plenty of evidence that a diet higher in O6 in summer and O3 in winter gets you on a cycle which favors people living in the North.

    Besides diet, there is also the issue of cold exposure. I like to dress as minimally as possible to avoid frostbite/hypothermia. On trips to check mail, run from car to work, or the store, I don't wear a coat at all even at -30. These short blasts of arctic air will cause your body to ramp up heat production and puts your metabolism in high gear. Also us northerners are able to tap into our BAT or brown fat more easily thanks to limited sun and cold temps.

    There's also a tie to lowered thyroid function in winter with life in the north called Polar T3 Syndrome. Some people have found it is advisable to take a thyroid supplement like Synthroid or Armour in winter. The only way to check is get a TSH/T4 test done in mid-winter and again in mid-summer.

    Later!

  6. #6
    Nady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fateater View Post
    Interesting - I'll try both. More water, and some barefoot earth time

    Thanks
    Not just more water, you need to replace the electrolytes/salt you lose with low carb. If you just drink water, you will wash out what few electrolytes/salt you have left.

  7. #7
    fateater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nady View Post
    Not just more water, you need to replace the electrolytes/salt you lose with low carb. If you just drink water, you will wash out what few electrolytes/salt you have left.
    Oh, gotcha. Salt won't be a problem, I am salting my food liberally with himalayan salt, or sea salt. Probably close to a full tsp. per day - Is that sufficient?

    Here I am freezing again, inside. I drank some tea with coconut cream, did some squats. Brrrrrrr

    Cold exposure is something I do - such as earlier today walking in the very windy and rainy with a light coat, no mittens, pushing the stroller. I like being a tad underdressed when I go out because it helps me walk faster Unless I am doing my body a disservice somehow...? It's about 4 degrees C out.

    It's just odd that all of a sudden the past fews days I suddenly notice feeling really cold, like I-want-to-take-a-hot-shower-cold.

    It could the change in season adjustment combined with the change in diet and pushing my body to shift from sugar burning to fat burning...?

    Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    There's also a tie to lowered thyroid function in winter with life in the north called Polar T3 Syndrome. Some people have found it is advisable to take a thyroid supplement like Synthroid or Armour in winter. The only way to check is get a TSH/T4 test done in mid-winter and again in mid-summer.
    A TSH and/or T4 test will not indicate low T3. A T3, preferable freeT3, test is needed in conjunction with TSH and free T4.

  9. #9
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    If your TSH is high and your T4 is low, you will guaranteed have low T3. But you are right, it would be best to get FT3 also, as well as TPO antibodies and reverse T3, but in the Polar T3 Syndrome which I speak, TSH and T4 are enough. Hardly any doctors test more than that, anyway, which is a pity, but I found out why--TSH and T4 are fairly easy tests that can be done in a standard lab, FT3, T3 and the antibodies can only be tested in a specialized lab, more time, more money.

    What happens in Polar T3 Syndrome, the shortened days and colder temps cause increased muscle uptake of T3, resulting in slightly high TSH and lowish T4. If you did also test FT3 it would be low.

    Many times, people present with this syndrome and are given high doses of Synthroid which shuts down a perfectly operating thyroid and kept on it forever. If thought was given to time of year, many people wouldn't be on Synthroid year round.

    Brief description and several good references here: Polar T3 syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  10. #10
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    When im freezing and i feel cold, my carbs are too low, so you may up your carbs a bit.

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