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Thread: Low Carb and Thyroid Function page 4

  1. #31
    BeatlesFan's Avatar
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    I know nothing about the thyroid and how low carb effects it buuuuuuuuut I just want to say that I am on a zero carb diet and as you can see my hair is doing just fine : )

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread69285.html

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmie View Post
    I'm hypothyroid (Hashimoto's), and I find all the misinformation about carbs/thyroid to be incredibly annoying.

    First of all, hypo 'symptoms' can be symptoms of many, many other things in a person. No individual gets all the symptoms, and someone with an array of 'thyroid' symptoms can have a very healthy thyroid. For example, often women who are 'dieting' will suffer hair loss because they fail to eat sufficient protein. And a person who is 'tired a lot' or 'can't lose weight' doesn't necessarily have thyroid problems. If you are actually hypothyroid (thyroid isn't producing sufficient hormones), eating carbs isn't going to 'cure' you. But if you have some other dysfunction that's causing the symptoms, it's certainly possible for a dietary change to effect improvement in symptoms. [Yes, it's like putting some duct tape over the illuminated "check engine" light and thinking you have fixed the car]

    Since one aspect of Hashimoto's that I suffer from is flawed conversion of T4 to T3, the notion that we need carbs for that is ludicrous. Yes. the body uses glucose during the conversion process, but that's because the body functions on glucose to maintain itself. The conversion of T4 to T3 is like any other bodily function, and the body will use part of its energy source to accomplish that conversion. No one has to eat a 'special' diet to enable the conversion.

    I happen to be a person who is extremely carb sensitive, and I do best at about 20g carbs or fewer. Because of my age and metabolic situation, I also have to eat very low calorie ("low' by standard measurements, but sufficient for my own body). My endo knows this and, if fact, applauds my WOE. Since he does a full blood panel every 4 months, it's apparent that my low-carb eating is very healthy for my particular body. At age 71, the only Rx I take are my supplemental thyroid hormones. My BP and blood glucose are all excellent.
    Thank you, Emmie.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artbuc View Post
    I would be the happiest person in the world if I did not have to worry about my BG going above 140. Can you cite some references that show no harm above 140? Thanks.
    Evelyn Kocur very well may be your savior, then. I know I'm committing a paleo sin by linking to the blog of a person who didn't learn biochemistry from Gary Taubes, but here's a series of posts that was sparked by the first study Neckhammer linked. Not sure if they're in proper order.

    I'm not sure where you fall on the spectrum of cognitive dissonance (I know Neckhammer won't read these, and if he does he'll laugh it off and give his typical "girl U crazy!" response), but here's an opposing viewpoint:

    Where did the 140 mg/dL threshold come from?
    Context is Everything I - Diabetic vs. Non
    Context is Everything II: The OGTT
    Do Postprandial Spikes Glycate?
    Diabetic Neuropathy, Is it All About Hyperglycemia?

    Quote Originally Posted by emmie View Post
    If you are actually hypothyroid (thyroid isn't producing sufficient hormones), eating carbs isn't going to 'cure' you.
    Nobody who understands the difference between hypothyroidism and ESS is suggesting that. However, carbohydrates can "cure" quality of life issues that can arise from ESS.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucy1984 View Post
    Solobiker - with that sleep profile, I'd think about getting your adrenal functions looked like. That early hours awakening thing can be a sign of your cortisol being too low/too high, or low and high at the wrong times.
    Adrenals Web
    Thanks for the link.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeatlesFan View Post
    I know nothing about the thyroid and how low carb effects it buuuuuuuuut I just want to say that I am on a zero carb diet and as you can see my hair is doing just fine : )

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread69285.html
    Great job!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthetaco View Post
    (I know Neckhammer won't read these, and if he does he'll laugh it off and give his typical "girl U crazy!" response)
    I actually don't ever recall saying that....

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthetaco View Post
    Evelyn Kocur very well may be your savior, then. I know I'm committing a paleo sin by linking to the blog of a person who didn't learn biochemistry from Gary Taubes, but here's a series of posts that was sparked by the first study Neckhammer linked. Not sure if they're in proper order.

    I'm not sure where you fall on the spectrum of cognitive dissonance (I know Neckhammer won't read these, and if he does he'll laugh it off and give his typical "girl U crazy!" response), but here's an opposing viewpoint:

    Where did the 140 mg/dL threshold come from?
    Context is Everything I - Diabetic vs. Non
    Context is Everything II: The OGTT
    Do Postprandial Spikes Glycate?
    Diabetic Neuropathy, Is it All About Hyperglycemia?



    Nobody who understands the difference between hypothyroidism and ESS is suggesting that. However, carbohydrates can "cure" quality of life issues that can arise from ESS.
    I did skim these links. No doubt that the evidence supporting nerve damage above 140 is far from iron clad. OTOH, you can say that about any nutrition or disease prevention theory out there. I find both sides of every issue are guilty of poking holes in the opposition data instead of positively putting forth their own argument. Biochemistry and genetics are so incomprehensibly complicated that no study will ever be a smoking gun. If you do not want to believe serum cholesterol causes CVD, it is easy to point out how no one has performed the perfect double-blind, randomized, controlled, placebo study conducted long enough to prove serum cholesterol causes CVD. Yet people will readily refer to totally sketchy studies to support their own theory. Your sources point out the lack of evidence supporting the 140 limit. However, what proof do they offer that 140 is safe? If you know you have a problem controlling blood sugar, you need to do something about it. If you think 140 is too low, pick another number which makes more sense to you. For me, I will stick to 140. I know that my vision is dramatically better since I went VLC, that is, since I have been keeping my 1 hour postprandial below 140. Also, I believe the macular hemorrage I experienced was due to high BG (came scary close to becoming blind in my right eye). Since I wasn't measuring BG before, I do not know what it typically ran, but doing a "homemade" OGTT and measuring my BG after a little ice cream, I am quite sure my BG stayed around 200 almost all day long on my previous diet. Maybe I would be ok at 160 or 180. If I had the interest, I could increase my carbs to control at 180 and see if my vision degrades. However, even if my vision stayed good, how would I know that other bad things were not happening? If "normal" people typically have 1 hour BG at 110-120 and are back to baseline at 2 hours, why shouldn't I shoot for 140 if I can achieve 140? If someone is closer to T2 than I, maybe the best they can do is 160 or 180 and that would represent a reasonable goal for them.
    Last edited by Artbuc; 11-14-2012 at 03:05 AM.

  8. #38
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    If you have impaired glucose tolerance, than you should definitely be more careful with your blood sugar. If you're really curious what your glucose tolerance is, and if you have good insurance or can afford one, I'd say get an official OGTT. For the perfectly insulin sensitive, under 200 at 1 hour seems to be normal. Blood sugar rises and falls; it's physiology, not pathology. The 140 number is thrown out by the low carb crowd to represent the one number you never want to surpass, ever, which is out of context and untrue. I remember in the potato thread someone shared a link about the 140 mg/dl threshold after Otzi posted his entirely normal post-prandial spike from eating potatoes.

    Unfortunately, low carb diets don't just appeal to those with IGT. I'm a non-diabetic 24 year old, and for a while I thought glucose was going to kill me. Low carb rhetoric can do that.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Thank you.
    Not trying to pick a fight, I have a sincere question:

    This thread was created for the purpose of gathering information from people who have had experience with thyroid issues and low carb. Why are you going out of your way to post studies that claim there isn't a link and repeatedly thanking people who are saying they personally haven't had problems?

    Clearly, this is an issue that some people are struggling with, and just because you aren't, that doesn't invalidate everyone else's experience.

  10. #40
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    The way I read the OP it was asking for incidences of low carb diet causing thyroid issues/hair loss... specifically hair loss as a symptom of low carb which is not necessarily a thyroid issue at all nor a carbohydrate consumption issue... Not issues of people who had existing thyroid issues and their experience with low carb diet causing further problems, though I respect your input as well.

    I think that the OP has diabetes, not thyroid issues, and that is the reason for his query.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


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